"Build" as written by Ian Peter Cullimore and Paul Heaton....
Build
Housemartins
Now That's What I Call Quite Good...

Clambering men in big bad boots
Dug up my den, dug up my roots.
Treated us like plasticine town
They build us up and knocked us down.

From Meccano to Legoland,
Here they come with a brick in their hand,
Men with heads filled up with sand,
It's build.

Chorus:
It's build a house where we can stay,
Add a new bit everyday.
It's build a road for us to cross,
Build us lots and lots and lots and lots.

Whistling men in yellow vans
They came and drew us diagrams.
Showed us how it all worked out
And wrote it down in case of doubt.

Slow, slow, quick, quick, quick,
It's wall to wall and brick to brick,
They work so fast it makes you sick,
It's build.

Chorus.
Down with sticks and up with bricks,
In with boots and up with roots,
It's in with suits and new recruits,
It's build...



Lyrics submitted by likorish

"Build" as written by Paul Heaton Ian Peter Cullimore

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Build song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentOf course it isn't pointless. The point of the song, along with a lot of the Housemartins stuff, is that the everyday, hardworking guy who puts his neck on the line day in day out, is never able to do enough to get so much as a bit of appreciation from the suits who tell them what to do. That ino matter how hard poeple work, people always want more. The Housemartins were a very 'anti-establishment' type band. Just look at the lyrics to this song, The People who Grinned Themselves to Death, Sheep and Happy Hour to name but four.
    djchapstickson July 24, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI've always felt this song was highlighting the percieved 'evils' of urban redevelopment, the lines: 'Dug up my den, dug up my roots, Treated us like plasticine town' could be a comment on the urban redevelopments of 50's and 60s and the social cost of tearing up communities to build new flats and houses.
    Joynseyon August 01, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentQuite right Joynsey. The bands own website describes this as a'subtle diatribe on the ill conceived regeneration of Britain's urban wasteland of the 1960's' Great song.
    pudseypumperon September 04, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt means Britain's regeneration of urban "wasteland" of the 1960's, the wasteland in reality was back to back houses where generations had grown up and lived, they knew everyone in the street and everyone worked locally, they where knocked down to be replaced by cheap temp housing which are council estates now, run down and left with under investment. Once the orginal site of the back to backs new professional flats where built and sold for massive profits, none of which was seen by the people who used to live there.
    duderooon June 20, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI would agree the song is about post war urban regeneration, Seacroft, Bransholme, Wythenshawe the likes, however I disagree with the sentiments. Most people at the time were thrilled to leave the back to back slums and move into modern houses with hot water, gardens, central heating etc. People just romanticise about the old back to backs, of which we still have about eight million in Leeds and are far worse then most council houses.
    mtaylor848on January 24, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment^ strange that the traditional terraced houses have stood the test of time whilst the new-builds of the 60's have all but vanished or been condemned.

    I'd rather live in a street of terraced houses in a community than a 60's skyscraper.

    Just one of many poignant songs that'll stand the test of time (unlike the 60's newbuilds) - from the 4th best band in Hull ;)
    ooSagon June 01, 2012   Link
  • -1
    General CommentA completely pointless song beautifully executed. Fantastic stuff! :)
    kevinbrightonon April 15, 2006   Link

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