"Synchronicity I" as written by and Gordon Matthew Sumner....
With one breath, with one flow
You will know
Synchronicity
A sleep trance, a dream dance,
A shared romance,
Synchronicity
A connecting principle,
Linked to the invisible
Almost imperceptible
Something inexpressible.
Science insusceptible
Logic so inflexible
Causally connectable
Nothing is invincible
If we share this nightmare
Then we can dream
Spiritus mundi
If you act, as you think,
The missing link,
Synchronicity
A connecting principle,
Linked to the invisible
Almost imperceptible
Something inexpressible.
Science insusceptible
Logic so inflexible
Causally connectable
Nothing is invincible
We know you, they know me
Extrasensory
Synchronicity
A star fall, a phone call,
It joins all,
Synchronicity
A connecting principle,
Linked to the invisible
Almost imperceptible
Something inexpressible.
Science insusceptible
Logic so inflexible
Causally connectable
Nothing is invincible
It's so deep, it's so wide
Your inside
Synchronicity
Effect without a cause
Sub-atomic laws, scientific pause
Synchronicity...


Lyrics submitted by Demau Senae

"Synchronicity I" as written by Gordon Matthew Sumner

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Synchronicity I song meanings
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  • +2
    General CommentI may be in the minority, but I have always preferred this song to Synchronicity Two.
    Major Valoron April 12, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentFrom Wikipedia
    Plainly put, [synchronicity] is the experience of having two (or more) things happen coincidentally in a manner that is meaningful to the person or persons experiencing them, where that meaning suggests an underlying pattern. It differs from coincidence in that synchronicity implies not just a happenstance, but an underlying pattern or dynamic that is being expressed through meaningful relationships or events.

    Examples
    A well-known example of synchronicity is the true story of the French writer Émile Deschamps who in 1805 was treated to some plum pudding by the stranger Monsieur de Fontgibu. Ten years later, he encountered plum pudding on the menu of a Paris restaurant, and wanted to order some, but the waiter told him the last dish had already been served to another customer, who turned out to be M. de Fontgibu. Many years later in 1832 Émile Deschamps was at a diner, and was once again offered plum pudding. He recalled the earlier incident and told his friends that only M. de Fontgibu was missing to make the setting complete - and in the same instant the now senile M. de Fontgibu entered the room.

    During production on the 1939 film version of The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, a coat purchased from a second-hand store for the costume of Professor Marvel later turned out to belong to L. Frank Baum; author of the original children's book on which the film is based.

    I left out the part about it being a Carl Jung concept because I thought someone else already added this. Guess they didn't, so I just did.

    Love this song ...
    sillybunnyon August 10, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentWhen I first heard this fast and brilliant song , I knew it will even have more energy playing it live...!
    It was the opening for their 1983 tour , and stewart showed the world what drumming is all about...! Magic stuff.
    The police untouchableon October 10, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is an explanation of the theory behind synchronicity....Synchronicity2 is the example of it in progress
    MoonlitKnighton February 03, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAnselm Hollo

    One a.m.
    And she has been sleeping
    Two hours
    Is still asleep
    Because she’s her kind of woman
    And because she’s sleeping
    She’s writing
    Words like love and hurt
    Kindness, unkindness, blindness
    Ecstasy, jealousy, anger
    Sweetness
    That too
    Sweetness
    Is making it with you
    sillybunnyon September 05, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe title song of the Police’s final studio album, Synchronicity, from 1983, was inspired by the writings of C. G. Jung. The Swiss psychiatrist postulated an “acausal connecting principle,” whereby seemingly coincidental events were held to have an underlying relation. That, he believed, offered an explanation for ostensibly paranormal occurrences such as phone calls arriving from people just as we have been thinking about them.

    [From Rock & Holy Rollers: The Spiritual Beliefs of Chart-Topping Rock Stars in Their Lives and Lyrics by Geoffrey D. Falk.]
    sillybunnyon September 21, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment[Stephen Holden—Rolling Stone 1983] The rest of the album belongs to Sting. "Synchronicity II" refracts the clanging chaos of "Synchronicity I" into a brutal slice of industrial-suburban life, intercut with images of the Loch Ness monster rising from the slime like an avenging demon.
    sillybunnyon September 22, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe lengthiest break in between albums - a whole year without an album, and the Police get back together despite the unbearable tension between the band members to record Synchronicity, the LP which would turn out to be their last one even if the band itself weren't at all aware of the fact at the time of recording. As everybody knows, of course, it was also their biggest commercial success, a smash worldwide hit that even threatened Thriller. This, of course, does not mean it's their best effort; but let it be stated loud and clear on the spot that in no way do I belong to the decisive party of Synchronicity-bashers. It is still a great record, and pretty unique in its little own way.
    The album's success was, of course, due to it being mainly a springboard for Sting's hit singles - 'Every Breath You Take' is the most grandiose of those, but 'King Of Pain' and 'Wrapped Around Your Finger' were also successes, and 'Syncronicity II' and 'Tea In The Sahara' also received a lot of airplay in their time. But the album is more than just a collection of singles. It has often been called a 'virtual Sting solo album', because Mr Sumner clearly dominates in a huge way that was unheard of before. The once famous band interplay is reduced to naught here; the best songs do not even feature Copeland's drumming in any interesting way, and as for Andy, well, he's definitely there, but he's starting to look more and more like a session man if you ask me.
    [George Starostin]
    sillybunnyon September 28, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI never really thought this song was that good until i tried drumming to it! Dang it's fast, the whole way through!!! His drumming was like the precursor for that new, almost-off-beat, metal stuff...
    drummer1500on January 17, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt has been said that this album might have been a double album and a lot of material was left on the cutting room floor due to in fighting of the members. With so many hits and just the occasional song that does not hit the mark this could be true. I wonder how many songs were walked onto later Sting solo albums?
    exexpat93on March 19, 2012   Link

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