"Invisible Sun" as written by and Gordon Matthew Sumner....
One, two, three, four, five, six
Oh oh oh oh oh oh

I don't want to spend the rest of my life
Looking at the barrel of an Armalite
I don't want to spend the rest of my days
Keeping out of trouble like the soldiers say

I don't want to spend my time in hell
Looking at the walls of a prison cell
I don't ever want to play the part
Of a statistic on a government chart

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
That gives us hope when the whole day's done

It's dark all day and it glows all night
Factory smoke and acetylene light
I face the day with me head caved in
Looking like something that the cat brought in

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
That gives us hope when the whole day's done

And they're only going to change this place
By killing everybody in the human race
They would kill me for a cigarette
But I don't even wanna die just yet

There has to be an invisible sun
It gives its heat to everyone
There has to be an invisible sun
That gives us hope when the whole day's done
Oh oh oh oh oh oh


Lyrics submitted by Demau Senae

"Invisible Sun" as written by Gordon Sumner

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Invisible Sun song meanings
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24 Comments

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  • +5
    General CommentFor those who disagree about this song being about Northern Ireland, I present this:

    "I don't want to spend the rest of my life
    Looking at the barrel of an Armalite"

    For those not familiar: an Armalite is an assault rifle which gained prominence because of the IRA's extensive use of it.

    The idea of the invisible sun being God actually sounds plausible to me, since the conflict in Northern Ireland had religious reasons (Catholics vs. Protestants). To me, it's like the person from whose perspective Sting is singing from is saying in the chorus "I don't buy that God hates Catholics or Protestants. God is all-loving and doesn't care how you worship him."

    Just my two cents.
    Mikeofreakon September 19, 2008   Link
  • +2
    General CommentThis is my favourite Police song and it is definitely about Northern Ireland.
    When he sings "There has to be an invisible sun
    It gives it's heat to everyone" I think he is talking about the Catholic - Protestant divide.
    Boss Manon July 08, 2005   Link
  • +2
    General CommentI've read that Sting was thinking in particular of an IRA prisoner hunger strike which was still underway at about the time he wrote the song.

    Much as I enjoy the more poetic and imaginative interpretations of the title, I admit that it seems most likely that the Invisible Sun represents God (a choice influenced by Occam's Razor perhaps). The representation of a universally life-giving entity is reminiscent of Talmudic sayings which (though also metaphorical) refer to G-d. Granted I have no reason to believe Mr. Sumner is familiar with Judaica, but he is evidently well-read (Paul Bowles, Koestler, Jung etc.)
    foreverdroneon July 15, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General CommentThis is my favorite song from the Police.
    Thia007on November 30, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI think the invisible sun is God. It could also be anything you need to believe in to get through a tough or meaningless life
    usa-1on April 17, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAnd then again, the extra production actually works fine on some of the tracks. There's no way the band could have inserted all that creepiness and near-gothic majesty into a song like 'Invisible Sun' three years ago. It may deal with the problems of Northern Ireland, of course, but you wouldn't really know that without a special education problem - basically, it's just a violent social rant from Stingie. Wait... violent? It's as stern and becalmed as anything, and that gives the song an extra edge. That unnerving countdown of one... two... three... four... five... six... at the beginning, the robotic dum-dum-dum of the main synthline, Andy's solid repetitive riff, the menacing whoah-whoah harmonies, and above all, Sting's vocal manner the likes of which he'd never assumed before: immobile and dark, without the usual whiny or screechy overtones, like he's the Lord Jesus or something. Yeah yeah I know what you're thinking about, but believe me, it really works - even in the somewhat 'brighter' chorus section, which contrasts with the dark verses in a way that doesn't please everyone (I think I see the obvious seam, too), but which you eventually get used to.
    'Invisible Sun' is, IMHO, the best song on here, but in no way does it overshadow the rest - as is the usual trick, EVERY song on here has at least something going on for it.
    [George Starostin]
    sillybunnyon September 28, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIts about the troubles in northern Ireland
    GuitaristUKon April 24, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIts about the troubles in northern Ireland
    GuitaristUKon April 24, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI don't think it has much to do with God. It's more like an invisible spirit, not to say God. Could be Zeus, Apollo, Aphrodite, or just your self-assurance that keeps you going.
    amazoneon May 20, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI don't see the indications that the song is specifically about Northern Ireland. It is certainly talking about a place where the government oppresses the people and industrial jobs make things even bleaker, but that could be any Orwellian society. It could have just as well been about East Germany or the USSR, couldn't it? In fact, was Northern Ireland at any point in the 20th century really as bad as the place this song describes?

    The lines "they're only going to change this place by killing everybody in the human race", if taken literally, indicate that the song is not about one country or another but a fictional one-world government -- certainly to change Northern Ireland, or even the USSR, you wouldn't have to kill everybody in the human race. You wouldn't even have to have killed all the citizens of Northern Ireland.

    The invisible sun is something the speaker imagines that could get one hope despite the bleakness of life in this society. It is powerfully ambiguous to say "there has to be..." He may be saying that such a thing does already exist, or else people would not be able to endure the way they do. Or he may be saying that things are too bleak and that such a thing is needed, but hasn't come along yet.
    rikdadon September 18, 2006   Link

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