"Have-A-Go Merchant" as written by and Steven Patrick/whyte Morrissey....
Have a go
When the pubs all close
And have a go when they open

Then have a go by the traffic lights
Cut up or shut up, you're alright !
And as always I'm here right behind you
And as always there's time, so have another go
Oh...

A small baby girl cradled in your arms
Your one big contribution
We'll never know
We'll never know
We'll never know
We'll never know
Ah, yes
Ah, yes
Oh...

Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Ah, ah, ha ha

A small girl runs crying, through the park
So freely her daddy berates her
Right now, so for the rest of her life
She is convinced that her daddy hates her
Oh...

Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha
Oh...
Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha
Oh...
Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha
Oh...
Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha
Oh...
Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha
Oh...
Ha ha, ha ha, ha ha
Oh, oh, ha ha


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

"Have-A-Go Merchant" as written by

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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Have-A-Go Merchant song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentA jab at Natalie Merchant, formerly of 10,000 Maniacs.
    getaccusedon July 05, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMy friend and I were discussing this song -- while it could be seen as a swipe at Natalie -- with it's near parody of her social-commentary styled lyrics, we think it could also be seen as about a young woman who because of the constant rejection of her by her own father -- she is constantly seeking a father figure at the bards -- constantly on the hunt -- a merchant, if you will. She does this to find affection and yet can't shake the image of her father -- an unrequited relationship -- and his voice intones "and as always I'm here right beside you" -- he's almost leading a tavern full of drunks in a sing-a-long exposing her of her Freudian ways
    davidbeauyon August 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYeah, I've heard this song is a dig at Natalie Merchant as well. I wonder if this song was released around the time Merchant started her solo career, which would make sense of "have a go" as in have a go at going solo. The irony of the song is that he appears to parody her social commentary style lyrics, while at the same time expressing support for her career "and always I'm her right beside you." Could it be that Morrissey sees parallels between his and Merchants carreers- they were both of popular bands, bands which disbanded around the height of their fame, and he wants Merchant to be successful as he has been successful. Though his lyrics are almost patronizing in the same manner of "The Girl Least Likely To." I wonder if Morrissey was somewhat jealous that the 10,000 Maniacs scored a hit with 'his' song- "Everyday is Like Sunday" or perhaps he did not deem them worthy enough to cover it and maybe that's why he takes swipes at Merchant's songwriting. His line about 'a small baby girl cradeled in your arms, your only contribution' appears to a reference to a particular Merchant or 10,000 Maniac's song and denigrating Merchant's songwriting to having written only one good song. I don't remember any hits referencing a baby girl, but I am not familiar enough with either of their catalogs to know. Seems similar to the swipe Lennon took at McCartney in "How Do You Sleep" - "the only thing you done was 'Yesterday'.

    The lines about the pubs opening and closing and traffic lights I interpret to be when and where her songs are likely to be played.

    The "we'll never know" line puzzles me. Surely he would know if she had any other hits. But again, this could just be a backhand swipe saying that he is not going to bother to pay attention to her career to know if she has any other successful or notable songs- or maybe he just expected her career to fall flat after her first album.

    Seems to be a pretty biting song overall.


    BillyBuddon December 12, 2009   Link

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