"Speedway" as written by Steven Morrissey and Martin James Boorer....
And when you slam
Down the hammer
Can you see it in your heart?
All of the rumors
Keeping me grounded
I never said, I never said that they were
Completely unfounded

So when you slam
Down the hammer
Can you see it in your heart?
Can you delve so low?
And when you're standing
On my fingers
Can you see it in your heart? Ah
And when you try
To break my spirit
It won't work
Because there's nothing left to break
Anymore
All of the rumors
Keeping me grounded
I never said, I never said that they were
Completely unfounded

You won't sleep
Until the earth that wants me
Finally has me
Oh you've done it now
You won't rest
Until the hearse that becomes me
Finally takes me
Oh you've done it now
And you won't smile
Until my loving mouth
Is shut good and proper
Forever

All of the rumors
Keeping me grounded
I never said, I never said that they were
Completely unfounded
And all those lies
Written lies, twisted lies
Well, they weren't lies
They weren't lies
They weren't lies

I never said
I never said
I could have mentioned your name
I could have dragged you in
Guilt by implication
By association
I've always been true to you
In my own strange way
I've always been true to you
In my own sick way
I'll always stay true to you


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

"Speedway" as written by Martin James Boorer Steven Morrissey

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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Speedway song meanings
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30 Comments

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  • +4
    My InterpretationI agree that the rumours most likely refer to those surrounding Moriissey himself, but could this song not also be about Oscar Wilde?

    The hammers refering to his court case and the 'rumours keeping him grounded' to the reports of his homosexuality that destroyed his career.
    There is nothing left to break because the public humiliation and degredation he had suffered was as bad as any legal punishment.
    The end, where he talks about guilt by implication and dragging someone in could really be seen as being about either Alfred Douglas or Wildes wife Constance Loyd.

    Morrissey idolises Wilde and it would certainly make sense. Of course, I could be totally wrong.
    joeandstuffon October 25, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI don't see the married man part, it just seems a bit more straight forward to me. He knows a secret, he got busted for something, and he took all the heat for it because he is in love with whomever else is implicated. and lights, this is such a great song.
    bugmenoton April 17, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI don't know...Morrissey HATES Joyce...wishes him pain...this song sounds more like he loves the person..deeply. Could it be about Marr?
    enolfon March 10, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI LOVE THIS SONG!!! This always reminds me of the film "The Children's Hour"
    blureefon August 22, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is a totally underrated song. One of my favorites.
    unexplained_lightson November 19, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOkay I'm guessing this song is about him having an affair with a married man, and this other person who he has had a relationship with is so scared that Morrissey himself just might tell everyone about there sordid encounters, but for Morrissey it goes far deeper, he loves him in his own sick way, and would never say a word about it, but is so angry this person would think he would tell a soul.
    Becoon March 11, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI assume this is about the situation regarding that court case against Mike Joyce. Slam down the hammer, guilt by implication, etc.

    How kick ass is that drum fill at the end?
    fourgangeron January 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI don't know if it's aimed at a man or a woman, and I wish people would stop on about it unless it's absolutely core to the song - like "Dear God, Please Help Me."

    This is exactly why he says he's celibate (well there's obviously some question of that with the new album) because it shouldn't matter.

    I think there's a lot of emotional weight in this song, be it via blame, condemnation and or just feeling lost:

    "And when you try to break my spirit
    It won't work because there's nothing left to break "

    So brilliantly put.

    Maybe it is about Marr, saying that he was part of the royalties debacle but he always took the full blame. But I don't think Marr has ever expressed any dislike for Morrissey, more confusion and bygones.

    And yes, that tribal beat at the end is fantastic.
    xdvron April 04, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAccordin to his own interviews, he stopped being celibate about 10-11 years ago (check The Face 1997 interview, the Janice Long 2002 BBC interview, the NME 2006 interview) and if you're so bloody interested, he's bisexual (check the Face 1990 interview and the Observer 1992 interview) - though he doesn't use the actual word because he hates labels. Who exactly he loves or who he sleeps with and if he is sleeping with anyone at all, he doesn't say and shouldn't be your business anyway. Are you all satisfied now?! Can we please move on?!

    Who or what this song is actually about, I don't know. Some of these interpretations are ridiculous enough (wow, how exactly did you see that it was about an affair with a married man?! why not a married woman? or why not an unmarried man/woman, a cat... :D), but not as ridiculous as the NME's interpretation - they thought it he was adressing them and that he meant that the racist allegations were true... yeah, right. In any case, anyone can interpret it however they like it.
    nightanddayon May 18, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt's about all of the rumors the media makes up about him. He's accepting guilt, if only to shut them the hell up. They totaly ruined his carreer in the 90's, especially the NME.

    But perhaps he provoked them. There was that preformance of National Front Disco where he wrapped himself in the Union Jack

    Hmm.
    mopo976on May 28, 2006   Link

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