"The Last Of The Famous International Playboys" as written by Stephen Street and Steven Morrissey....
Dear hero imprisoned
With all the new crimes that you are perfecting
Oh, I can't help quoting you
Because everything that you said rings true
And now in my cell
(well, I followed you)
And here's a list of who I slew

Reggie Kray - do you know my name?
Oh, don't say you don't
Please say you do, (oh) I am :

The last of the famous
International playboys
The last of the famous
International playboys

And in my cell
(well, I loved you)
And every man with a job to do
Ronnie Kray - do you know my face?
Oh, don't say you don't
Please say you do, (oh) I am :

The last of the famous
International playboys
The last of the famous
International playboys

In our lifetime those who kill
The news world hands them stardom
And these are the ways
On which I was raised
These are the ways
On which I was raised

I never wanted to kill
I am not naturally evil
Such things I do
Just to make myself
More attractive to you
Have I failed?

Oh...

Oh, the last of the famous
International playboys
The last of the famous


Lyrics submitted by weezerific:cutlery

"The Last of the Famous International Playboys" as written by Steven Morrissey Stephen Brian Street

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

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The Last Of The Famous International Playboys song meanings
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14 Comments

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  • +4
    General CommentMorrissey's voice really carries the melody here, which is so rare these days in our land of Britney and Fifty. He could sing this song acapella and it would still work. Such a talented man.
    cmckinleyon August 23, 2006   Link
  • +2
    General CommentOoh, the way he sings "Reggie Kray!" just sends shivers down my spine.

    (And "Ronnie Kray").

    And a ridiculously catchy chorus. The man is either mental or a genius, or both.
    FishesWillLaughon August 15, 2007   Link
  • +2
    My InterpretationSo, I know Morrissey is always extremely ambiguous, but I think about the meaning to this song a lot and the last full verse doesn't seem to 100% fit:

    "I never wanted to kill
    I am not naturally evil
    Such things I do
    Just to make myself
    More attractive to you
    Have I failed?"

    Makes me think it could be about the Moors murderers as well as the other criminal figures - the Kray twins. I say this because he sings 'Such things I do, just to make myself more attracted to you' which makes me think of Ian Brady and how he was supposed to have been an okay person but then he met Myra Hindley and they conspired to do what they did, thus he made himself more attractive for her therefore she was making herself become more attracted to him. I could be totally off-mark here though.

    I do find increasingly interesting that many of the musicians I like lived through things that is history that I have to learn all about.. To me, this song practically highlights England in the 60s - consumed by the media's glamorised killers.
    jajoneson April 21, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General CommentSome people read this song as glamorising the Krays. I think it does the opposite. He is criticising the media's glamorisation of such figures that encourages naive kids to try and be "hard" like them and end up ruining their lives because of it.
    Aurora2on October 26, 2004   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI wonder if the title of this is partially a reference to J. M Synge' 'The Playboy of the Western World', a controversial Irish play from the early 1900s.

    The play focusses on a small community in Ireland, into which arrives a mysterious man on the run, Christy. At first it appears he has killed his father, which lends him a seeming aura of mystery and dangerous attraction; instead of being repelled, the villagers are fascinated and one of the women falls in love with him. The play ends with the father (who was in reality injured rather than killed) also arriving, and the villagers turning upon Christy for having lied to them; Christy then escapes with his father, leaving his lover to lament in the play's final line "Oh my grief, I've lost him surely. I've lost the only Playboy of the Western World."

    It's an interesting play, and ties in themes of love, murder, betrayal, gang mentality and the glamourisation of crime, as well as having the similarities in the title.

    xpixiexon May 10, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOne of the Kray brothers was openly homosexual and schizophrenic.
    unexplained_lightson November 19, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"The Last Of The Secret Agents", song by Nancy Sinatra.
    marquiceriseon December 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe Krays were such a cool icon of swinging 60's Britain.
    bkat004on January 29, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment'I never wanted to kill I'm not naturally evil' also reminds me of the stance of Frankenstein's monster in the book Frankenstein. Initially an innocent and kind creature, the creature is driven by the rejection of humanity to kill.
    rapiston January 14, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is my favourite Morrissey song. Also agree with everything said.
    Whatsername1251on May 19, 2007   Link

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