"Du Hast (English Version)" as written by Oliver Riedel, Doktor Christian Lorenz, Christoph Doom Schneider, Richard Z. Kruspe, Paul Landers and Till Lindemann....
do
do hast
do hast mich

do
do hast
do hast mich

do hast mich
do hast mich gefragt
do hast mich gefragt
do hast mich gefragt und ich hab nichts gesagt

Willst do bis der Tod euch scheidet
treu ihr sein f¨¹r alle Tage...

nein

Willst do bis zum Tod der Scheide
sie lieben auch in schlechten Tagen.

nein


(Translation:

You Have
--------


You
You have
You have me

You
You have
You have me
You have me to say
You have me to say
You have asked me
And I have not answered

Will you until death does sever
Be upright to her forever

Never

Will you 'til death be her rider
Her lover too, to stay inside her

Never )


Lyrics submitted by HoldURBreath

"Du Hast" as written by Oliver Riedel, Doktor Christian Lorenz, Christoph Doom Schneider, Richard Z. Kruspe, Paul Landers, Till Lindemann

Lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Universal Music Publishing Group

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Du Hast (English) song meanings
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95 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentIn German, the word 'hasst' [i.e., 'haßt'] means hate. If you 'hast mich gefragt,' you have asked me. 'Du Hast' by itself is actually a sentence fragment [identical to saying 'you have' in English -- you have ('done,' understood) what?]. It's a play on words. My friend Felix in Germany says the line about 'willst du bis der Tod euch Scheide, treu ihr sein fur alle Tage?' is part of a wedding vow. I personally can't be sure.
    Renzokuon May 22, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General CommentYes, their English version and lyrics may say "you hate" but if you're wanting the direct translation, it's "you have". I have a friend who grew up in Germany and is fluent in German who agrees with me. I also have another friend who is an exchange student from Germany who says the same thing. So, in a way, they're both right. Rammstein changed it from "you have" to "you hate" when they recorded the english version "to appeal to the american public" (like someone already said) or some crap like that which is why everyone's confused.
    Phyxiuson May 31, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General CommentCaptain Feral, you're German, and you translate "und ich hab' nichts gesagt" as "and I did not obey"? The English translation is completely wrong and it's been written wrongly simply so English people would get the main gist of it without losing rhyme. Apparently rhyme is more important than the whole meaning of the song, which I don't agree with, but hey, not my song. Patronise, the word is 'hast', no question about it. Their song is called "Du Hast", are we all to assume Rammstein just can't spell?

    Why are you arguing? It's a play on words. Doesn't work in English because English isn't German. I'd have thought any idiot could work that out. Hast and hasst sound the same in German. Hate and have don't sound the same in English. We can't reproduce the pun, but why are you finding it so hard to UNDERSTAND it? The point is that we assume it says 'you hate me' until Till throws another verb at us, then we realise it's 'du hast', not 'du hasst'.
    billywoods1on May 19, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Commentyoutube.com/…

    Yes, they definitely say "Hate". I think it's a play on words, personally. Since "Hasst" translates to "Hate", and "Hast" translates to "Have", it's of my belief that Rammstein purposely made the song as such in order to illustrate the ambiguity in marriage. Just my thoughts.
    Mathos22on July 23, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOkay, first, if anyone reading this knows any german, they know that HAST does not mean HATE. Hasse means Hate, Hast means HAVE. It's "You have me" not "You hate me". This song is about questioning marriage, as told by the denial of vows. Will you be a slave? Will you serve unwittingly? Will you stay with her until death? And as we can see, by the loud explamations of "NEIN!" (which means "no"), the answer is no.
    gotterdamon February 02, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentDid you know that your the first person to object to that...

    The song would make must less sense if it was to go the way you say it is supposed to...
    PapaRoacher_5kon April 27, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYeah, this coming from a guy whose favorite band is Papa Roach.

    gotterdam is right, and yet not right. The lyrics are posted as being hast, but supposedly (I don't know German myself) it is meant to be a double meaning between hate and have. It's spelled "hast" but pronounced "hasst".
    MetaLunaon April 28, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo add to the discussion. My interpretation (as a german) is that on one hand we have a denial of (wedding?) vows as in "Du hast mich gefragt" - 'you have asked me' followed by the answer "Nein" - 'No'

    It is this answer which leads to the second interpretation "Du hasst mich" - 'You hate me' inferred because I said No. Interstingly on he live DVD, the lead singer Till uses a mobile phone prop to suggest that we are talking about a phone conversation.
    TheBaronon May 02, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThere's alwasy debate about whether it's you hate or you have, but these lyrics are the ones printed in the album lyrics sheet. beware the incredibly cheesey english version which uses these words....
    PunkGothon May 07, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMy album copy of "Sehnsucht" has the band singing both "Du Hast" and "Engel" in English at the end of the CD...and in their English version it is "You Hate"....

    If that means anything....
    Marshenkoon June 15, 2002   Link

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