"Wonderful Woman" as written by and Steven Patrick/marr Morrissey....
Here her head, she lay
Until she'd rise and say,
"I'm starved of mirth,
Let's go and trip a dwarf"

Oh, what to be done with her?
Oh, what to be done with her?

Ice water for blood
With neither heart or spine
And then just
To pass time; let us go and rob the blind

What to be done with her?
I ask myself,
What to be said of her?

But when she calls me, I do not walk, I run
Oh, when she calls, I do not walk, I run


Lyrics submitted by renathon

"Wonderful Woman" as written by Johnny Marr Steven Morrissey

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc., Universal Music Publishing Group

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Wonderful Woman song meanings
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  • +2
    General Commenthere's what Morrissey later said about this song (as quoted in Simon Goddard's book 'Songs That Saved Your Life'):

    "In a monotonous way, it's quite tongue-and-cheek. The wonderful woman is actually an incredibly vicious person but still at the end of the day she had this incredible magnetic ray to me. All the things that she wanted to do, nasty as they were, were completely forgivable due to whatever reason. It's all metaphysical."

    So basically he admited it was autobiographical, whoever it was about. Whether it was about Linder or someone else, we can't know for sure. The femme fatale in question is described as a really vicious person, which makes it odd if it is about her - however, I am well aware that human relationships are complex and that there's a thin line between love and hate and all that, so it is still very possible.

    Though it doesn't prove anything and it might be just a coincidence, it is still interesting that in 2002 Morrissey introduced Linder on stage at the second of his his Royal Hall concerts, where she was officially taking photos, as "Linder Sterling - a wonderful woman".
    nightanddayon May 15, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commentfantastic song!

    its definatly one of my top 5 favourite smiths songs
    come on people whats wrong with you? :P great song!
    Chillyon March 03, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Commentgorgeous, I am moved to tears when he sings when she calls me I do not walk I run.... the desperate hopelessness of knowing she's a rotter but feeling spellbound

    and is their a better line than ice water for blood with neither heart nor spine...a true Mozzer classic lyric - why wasn't it included anywhere? the instrumental accompanyment is delightfully lush and touching too!!!?
    tallulaton May 02, 2005   Link
  • +1
    General Commenti will just use "maybe's" to my thoughts, obviously isn't the right interpretation, but it is what i thought.

    Here her head, she lay
    Until she'd rise and say,
    "I'm starved of mirth,
    Let's go and trip a dwarf"

    "Well the couple was lying, wherever was, and maybe she was boring, so she wanted to do something different/new. The verse about ""Trip a dwarf"" describe this hungry for ""mirth"". Also, for this ""dwarf"", i don't think it's about the dwarfism(medical condition) i think it's the mystical/mythology thought for being more surrealistic or unusual."


    Oh, what to be done with her?
    Oh, what to be done with her?

    "Alright, this can be so much deep about the lyrical, but thats the point.
    If you thought about the Morrissey sexuality in this verse, you might discovered some hyphoteses about bissexuality. ""That's because: what to be done with her"" it's an thought about: i need to dispense her, and stuff...
    You can say: oh but he can dispense her, but find another woman too.
    Yeah, maybe you right. But i think, from the other songs, this is about bissexuality.


    Ice water for blood
    With neither heart or spine
    And then just
    To pass time
    "Let's go and rob the blind"

    "Ice water for blood, with neither heart or spine, and then just to pass time. This shows how she was acting with him.This is an metaphor hard to understand, but probably its about the coldness in their relationship, "the boring zone". And then, again, the ""mirth"" strikes again in the verse:""Let's go and rob the blind"" ."

    What to be done with her?
    I ask myself
    What to be said of her?
    Oh...

    "He still with the same thought, and this: ""what to be said of her"" probably its an conformism about her way."

    But when she calls me
    I do not walk, I run
    Oh, when she calls
    I do not walk, I run
    Oh...

    "For finish, this antitheses comprove that he still love her. She maybe was cold and mistread him, but suddenly when she calls, he do not walk, he run. This can also be a point to first relationships.(These that you love so much that you lost your senses)."


    Extra thought: For the instrumental parts, seems melancholic and perfectly works aswell with the lyrical.
    hayarton January 22, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General Commentabout morrissey's oldest friend, Linder.
    Boss Manon July 19, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Commentit seems so... and Miserable Lie is usually thought to be about her and their relatiosnhip (whatever it was) when they usedf to cohabit in Whalley Range. And they have stayed friends for almost 30 years afterwards.... It's an odd relationship, I'd say.
    nightanddayon December 28, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentNME writer Nick Kent once suggested that this song may have been inspired by Morrissey's friend Linder, although there are no specific references to Linder in the song.
    marquiceriseon January 13, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthe idea that it's about linder stirling is much more obvious in "miserable lie" but i still think it's quite likely that this song is as well.
    1imaginarygirlon February 18, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is my favorite Smiths song. Everything about it is perfect.
    tidalwaveon February 14, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love how it is added to the this charming man collectors(?) edition with all of those versions. It seems so cool (charming man: wonderful woman:) )
    PaintAVulgarPicon March 28, 2010   Link

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