"Statesboro Blues" as written by and Willie Mctell....
Wake up momma, turn your lamp down low
Wake up momma, turn your lamp down low
You got no nerve baby, to turn Uncle John from your door

I woke up this morning, I had them Statesboro Blues,
I woke up this morning, had them Statesboro Blues
Well, I looked over in the corner baby, and Grandpa seemed to have them too

Well my momma died and left me,
My poppa died and left me,
I ain't good looking baby,
Want someone sweet and kind

I'm goin' to the country, baby do you wanna go?
But if you can't make it baby, your sister Lucille said she wanna go
And I sure will take her

I love that woman, better than any woman I've ever seen
Well, I love that woman, better than any woman I've ever seen
Well, now, she treat me like a king, yeah, yeah, yeah,
I treat her like a doggone queen

Lord wake my momma, turn your lamp down low
Wake up momma, but turn your lamp down low
You got no nerve baby, to turn Uncle John from your door, no!


Lyrics submitted by shut

"Statesboro Blues" as written by Willie Mctell

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

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Statesboro Blues song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentTaj Mahal does a lovely version of this song also. Both aong versions are great in their own ways.
    chrisb1on February 03, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentGreat version of Willie Mc Tell's Stateboro Blues
    FreeWheelinon May 11, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General Commentone of Duane's best slide performances
    woodcock92627on December 22, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song and Bly Sky might be the best Allman Bro's songs ever.
    EATaPEACHon April 01, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Statesboro Blues" is a blues song written by Blind Willie McTell; the title refers to the town of Statesboro, Georgia. McTell made the first recording of the song on October 17, 1928.

    McTell borrowed part of the lyrics from a 1923 Sippie Wallace recording of "Up The Country Blues" which was later popularized by Canned Heat as "Goin' Up the Country".

    The song has since been covered by many other artists including Taj Mahal. The most familiar and most popular rendition of the song is by The Allman Brothers Band, as recorded at the Fillmore East in March 1971 and first released on the 1971 album The Allman Brothers Band At Fillmore East. It features Duane Allman's masterful slide guitar playing.

    The original version contains several different lines that are different from the Allman Brothers version. This maybe due to the tradition of improvisation in Blues especially in lyrics.
    doit10on January 18, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis version was based on Taj Mahal's.
    azkmon April 26, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIMHO the live (Fillmore) version is superior to their studio version. Always a sign of a quality band when live sounds better than studio.
    I think it has to do with Duane's slide guitar which has a much more raw authentic sound to it on the live version.
    chrisb1on January 13, 2008   Link

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