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hey baby
love me
lay money down
say baby
lay money down

hey baby
love me
lay money down
say baby
lay money down

i'm not in love with you
i'm not in love with you
i'm not in love with your love
woah alright

i'm not in love with you
i'm not in love with you
i'm not in love with your love
alright


Lyrics submitted by backupdork

Zep Song song meanings
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11 Comments

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  • 0
    General Commentmeening is pretty straight forward. if you love me give up the money. and rivers is not in love with this woman's sex. Makes for a tight song. EVERYONE DOWNLOAD IT
    nosracon June 30, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Commenta very tight song
    sean7711on July 22, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwell heres the deal: while it may seem straightfoward, you show an extreme lack of depth in taste. to borrow a quote from my uncle: "Music is derivative. Everyone can trace a sound to someone else, and eventually i guess you could trace it back to a caveman banging on a rock." We wont go that far. We'll go back to like...say...1969-1974, around the time Led ZEPpelin was popular. You'll notice the ZEP in capitals...thats where "ZEP" song comes from, i beleive.

    On top of this, i QUOTE two zeppelin songs: Living Loving Maid and Heartbreaker, both off Led Zeppelin II, 1969 Atlantic Records..:
    Living Loving Maid:
    Come on, baby on the round about, ride on the merry-go-round,
    We all know what your name is, so you better lay your money down.

    Heartbreaker:

    Hey fellas, have you heard the news? You know that Annie's back in town?
    It won't take long just watch and see how the fellas lay their money down.

    -----------

    Now Zep Song:

    "lay money down"
    "hey baby"

    --------------

    now while you may say that these are very general phrases....i'll point out that i know very few other bands who use the phrase "Lay money down." Now i've heard lots of zeppelin infulence in =W= songs, and this, i think, may very well be a tribute to one of their influences.

    So by thinking it's straightfoward and just about love and sex in general, its like saying the meaning of Animal Farm is straight foward: some animals take over a farm and make it their own. You seemed to have glanced over the deeper meaning. If you can show me a substantial about of evidence to the contrary, i will retract my ideas, but as of now, i think the meaning is less straightfoward than you think.
    Sublime54465on September 12, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwell heres the deal: while it may seem straightfoward, you show an extreme lack of depth in taste. to borrow a quote from my uncle: "Music is derivative. Everyone can trace a sound to someone else, and eventually i guess you could trace it back to a caveman banging on a rock." We wont go that far. We'll go back to like...say...1969-1974, around the time Led ZEPpelin was popular. You'll notice the ZEP in capitals...thats where "ZEP" song comes from, i beleive.

    On top of this, i QUOTE two zeppelin songs: Living Loving Maid and Heartbreaker, both off Led Zeppelin II, 1969 Atlantic Records..:
    Living Loving Maid:
    Come on, baby on the round about, ride on the merry-go-round,
    We all know what your name is, so you better lay your money down.

    Heartbreaker:

    Hey fellas, have you heard the news? You know that Annie's back in town?
    It won't take long just watch and see how the fellas lay their money down.

    -----------

    Now Zep Song:

    "lay money down"
    "hey baby"

    --------------

    now while you may say that these are very general phrases....i'll point out that i know very few other bands who use the phrase "Lay money down." Now i've heard lots of zeppelin infulence in =W= songs, and this, i think, may very well be a tribute to one of their influences.

    So by thinking it's straightfoward and just about love and sex in general, its like saying the meaning of Animal Farm is straight foward: some animals take over a farm and make it their own. You seemed to have glanced over the deeper meaning. If you can show me a substantial about of evidence to the contrary, i will retract my ideas, but as of now, i think the meaning is less straightfoward than you think.
    Sublime54465on September 12, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWow. Nice insight and research sublime. Animal Farm was a good book.
    _weezer_on March 14, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWow. Nice insight and research sublime. Animal Farm was a good book.
    _weezer_on March 14, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General Commentpretentious bastard.

    Great song.
    JoeyHon April 17, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSublime, the songs inspired by Zeppelin, whats your point?

    Even if it was inspired by zeppelin, it doesn't make the meaning of the song any deeper. It just means they looked at Zeppelin, probably related to the songs you mentioned and decided to write a song inspired by those two things.

    And stop trying to sound like an analytical genius, because the way you write just makes people think your a git.
    kryptic_kiton May 21, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think this is a bit deeper than just copying zeppelin because he ran out of ideas; he contrasts the zep lines with "I'm not in love with you."

    Why? I think it's because he's frustrated that by embracing rock idioms, people think he's trying to be another, say, Robert Plant, but he's really not interested in that kind of relationship with his fans. I'm extrapolating, but if I wrote this song, It would definitely have the meaning "I may be a rocker, but I don't love like a rocker, and I don't like it when fans act like I'm that kind of person."
    themutantchairon January 12, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentLed Zeppelin and Weezer both rock. I gotta get this song
    Weezerspideron October 16, 2006   Link

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