"Won'dring Again" as written by and Ian Anderson....
There's the stillness of death on a deathly unliving sea
And the motorcar magical world has long since ceased to be,
When the eve bitten apple returned to destroy the tree.
Incestuous ancestry's charabanc ride,
Spawning new millions throws the world on its side.
Supporting their farflung illusion, the national curse,
And those with no sandwiches please get off the bus.

The excrement bubbles, the century's slime decays,
And the brainwashing government lackeys would have us say
It's under control and we'll soon be on our way
To a grand year for babies and quiz panel games
Of the hot hungry millions you'll be sure to remain.
The natural resources are dwinding and no one grows old
And those with no homes to go to, please pick yourself holes.

We wandered through quiet lands, felt the first breath of snow,
Searched for the last pigeon, slate gray I've been told.
Stumbled on a daffodil which she crushed in the rush,
Heard it sigh and left it to die.
At once felt remorse and were touched by the loss of our own,
Held its poor broken head in her hands, dropped soft tears in the snow
And it's only the taking that makes you what you are.
Wondering aloud will a son one day be born
To share in our infancy in the child's path we've worn.
In the aging seclusion of this earth that our birth,
Did surprise. We'll open his eyes.


Lyrics submitted by knate15

"Wond'ring Again" as written by Ian Anderson

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Wond'ring Again song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentWas there a miscarriage? That has been my question all this time. He expresses resentment for an amply populated world and yet unable to conceive a child of their own. Irony?

    My all time favorite J.T. song!
    jcaudioon January 21, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe second half of the song, when the music slows represents the aftermath of civilizations downfall. Searching for the last pigeon represents the loss of life and how precious and rare it has become...this mourning is represented in the lady's sadness after she crushes a flower inadvertantly. These few survivors are wondering about whether or not they will be able to bring new life to the earth.
    Ovichsanon January 31, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think this song is really beautiful and its counterpart, Wond'ring Aloud, is just as good. The song is a response to a study about the rapid explosion of human population and its effects on the planet.
    "The brainwashing government lackeys would have us say it's under control and we'll soon be on our way."
    Even though this explosion is happeneing as we speak, the government would have us believe that everything is fine. When the song changes in the end, it begins to describe a woman and a man who are "Wond'ring aloud will a son one day be born
    to share in our infancy
    in the child's path we've worn.
    In the aging seclusion of this earth that our birth did surprise
    we'll open his eyes."
    This part serves to say that even though things look dismal, we can teach the next generation about the problems so they can avoid the same mistakes. This song is one of Tull's best and one of the most underrated.
    Anomaly57on December 04, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is probably a bit of stretch but considering that this song is a continuation of "Wondring Aloud" which was on the Aqualung album, I always thought this song is yet another political protest about the government's handling of the homeless. However, I do like "Ovichsan's" theory.
    But to continue with my thought; I believe that Ian is using the government's handling of the homeless as a metaphor for evil. So evidence to that would be the line "Those without homes dig yourself holes" and "Those without sandwiches get off the bus"
    When he sings "we wandered through..." he is singing the part of a homeless person at the beginning of winter. Obviusly the winter brings "seclusion" to the streets.
    I think the child he refers too is Jesus. I always considered this part of the song to be the homeless person searching for the good forces to fight the evil (government).
    karayan1on October 05, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo me, the song is all about being disgusted with overpopulation in the world. At times he is really furious, then tries to calm down, then becomes furious again, and wonders why nobody seems to notice our problem.
    "There's the stillness of death on a deathly unliving sea,
    and the motor car magical world long since ceased to be,"
    This pair is talking about how we have spawned more millions of people, to the point that we killed the earth, and soon things like cars will be a thing of the past in this new dead husk of a world.

    when the Eve-bitten apple returned to destroy the tree.
    Incestuous ancestry's charabanc ride,
    spawning new millions throws the world on its side.
    Yes, I know that charabanc is a name of a bus company in England. But I really think he was using a different meaning, and softening it for the audience. I think charabanc is really "share a bang ride". Back then, "bang" meant fornicate. So the Eve-botten apple is clearly about lust, and this set is about how with lust, we have gone overboard and "killed the tree". If we all came from Adam and Eve, we all have incestuous ancestors.

    to a grand year for babies and quiz panel games
    of the hot hungry millions you'll be sure to remain.
    The natural resources are dwindling and no one grows old,
    and those with no homes to go to, please dig yourself holes.
    The Baby Boom started in the 1950s, when it was a grand year for babies, and on TV there were tons of quiz panel games. "Hey, everyone can have babies now and the world is wonderful", but let's ignore the lower class and tell them to dig themselves holes.


    SedgeHawkon February 23, 2011   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationI think this song is about overpopulation taking a toll on the Earth's natural resources, along with the negative effects of the Industrial Revolution destroying the ecosystem.
    The second verse seems to be describing the current state of affairs in which world governments keep telling us to keep buying and consuming and trashing and wasting - everything will be fine.
    The third verse seems to imply that future generations living in the aftermath of the self-destruction of modern civilization will have an innate appreciation for the things our generation takes for granted.
    bizarroderrickon June 02, 2015   Link

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