"Angry Johnny" as written by Felix Cavaliere, Ralph James Rice and Annie Decatur Danielewski....
Johnny, Angry Johnny, this is Jezebel in Hell
I want to kill you, I want to blow you...away

I can do it you gently
I can do it with an animal's grace
I can do it with precision
I can do it with gormet taste

[Chorus]
But either way
Either (way), either way
I want to kill you
I want to blow you...
Away

I can do it to your mind
I can do it to your face
I can do it with integrity
I can do it with disgrace

[Chorus]

Johnny, Angry Johnny, this is Jezebel in Hell
Johnny, Angry Johnny, this is Jezebel in Hell

I can do it in a church
I can do it any time or place
I can do it like an angel
To quiet down your rage

[Chorus]

I can do it in the water
I can do on dry land
I can do it with instruments
I can do it with my own bare hands

But either way
Either way, you know where it stands
I want to kill you
I want to blow you...
Away

Johnny, Angry Johnny, this is Jezebel in Hell
Johnny, oh my Johnny

Where did your pleasure go
When the pain came through you
Where did your happiness go
This force is running you around now
Getting you down now
Where is your pleasure now Johnny
Where has your pleasure gone now

Johnny, Angry Johnny...


Lyrics submitted by citizenx

"Angry Johnny" as written by Felix Cavaliere Annie Decatur Danielewski

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Angry Johnny song meanings
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49 Comments

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  • +2
    General CommentHaving seen the video, I would suggest that this song is about the desire to quiet the "angry" aspects of a lover's personality. Jezebel advocated hedonism, and I interpret the song as saying hang-ups are preventing the mortal Johnny from enjoying himself. The "dark angel" who is singing the song (Live...from Hell!) wants to unblock him. The song uses death as a metaphor for release--sexual ("blow you") or otherwise--to allow Johnny the freedoms she has. Yet there is an implied selfishness to it; she wants him to forget the things that are tying up his emotions so she can possess him. It seems a little like the predicament of John the Savage from Brave New World...to be with his siren, he must forego human nature and surrender to being somewhat mechanical.
    seattlesqueon June 13, 2003   Link
  • +2
    Song MeaningThis song is about her brothers book. Its about a Johnny in her book and the book has a lot of double meanings also. It may have been published in 2000. But the book had been around prior to that. In fact it was born the week her dad died. But to get a deeper value to this song and the album in whole I suggest reading The House Leaves.

    Q:Inspired by Poe's childhood and the death of her father. She lived on her own after her parents divorced when she was 16, and her father died a few years later.
    truth to the song and the book

    Not that she's particularly happy with Johnny here, but the "killing" she's talking about is something ultimately for his own good, at least in her mind. This has high accuracy to the meaning and the book.
    Havenlyon November 12, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI'm sure that she wants to kill "Johnny." But ask "Why?" Usually females don't go off the deep end like this unless someone has hurt them beyond belief. I think that rape was involved because it truly is a tragic and criminal act for women. First, she says "this is jezebel in hell" and if I remember correctly jezebel is the queen (or something) in the underworld, meaning that she is evil and in her own hell. And I think the lyric "where has your pleasure gone" goes to show that the forced intercoarse was short lived. I think that "Johnny" would have gotten what he deserved if I am right.
    NSearchOfTruthon July 13, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General CommentActually, Jezebel was the wife of King Ahab of Israel. She betrayed him and their religion (Judaism) by introducing the worship of Baal. She was thrown out of a window to her death and dogs ate most of her body. Becuase of her actions, she has since been considered wicked and evil.
    Aside from that, I think that NSearchOfTruth has the right idea, about the reason behind the song being rape. She calls him Angry Johnny; rape is a crime of anger. Also, as NSearchOfTruth said, where has your pleasure gone, points out that the tables were turned. Sometimes, in cases of abuse (of any kind), the victim will turn into the abuser, especially if the original offender is somehow weakened or vulnerable. Her anger thus becomes a mirror of his previous actions.
    dealupaon August 23, 2002   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI agree with dealupa. Whenever I hear this song, I imagine a girl sort of stalking down her abuser and hurting him.
    death_by_catapulton March 20, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General CommentYes, you're right about how Johnny is the name of somone in House of Leaves. However, this CD was released in 1995, House of Leaves: 2000. I remember reading a quote from Poe that said she often (and her brother too) uses the name "Johnny" because it's a name for the "every man." It's generic, and that's why she and Mark use it. "Johnny" could be anyone.
    wanderingstaron April 25, 2003   Link
  • +1
    General Commentanger, rage... well, men can sometimes be stupid and insensitive.. obviously, her pain is too much to bear, it's some kind of outlet.
    cold_rainon June 24, 2003   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis is the best pissed-off chick song in the world!
    nietzsche_66on June 03, 2002   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI really like this song...this was the first Poe song I listened to, and I went out and bought the CDs lol. I always thought it was a definately a song about a victim of rape or abuse. Also...in another song of Poe's didn't she use the lines, "Johnny dear, don't be afraid, I will keep your secret safe." ?
    Rie-mixon April 17, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love this song. Inspires to every evil person in this fuckin´ world. Evil and wicked.
    tommibon April 24, 2004   Link

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