"Nightingale Song" as written by and Dinning/guss/phillips/nichols....
We sing the nightingale song alive
Streets never border further than my sight
We sing the nightingale song alive
We might be different but our hearts won't lie

And little ever changes if anything at all
But the song rings loudly through these halls

We sing the nightingale song alive
We might be different but our hearts won't lie

And little ever changes when you view it from the sky
And the damage we encounter the earth just passes by
And little ever changes if anything at all
And we remind ourselves how small we are


Lyrics submitted by rabidpenguin

"Nightingale Song" as written by

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC, Universal Music Publishing Group, THE ADMINISTRATION MP, INC.

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Nightingale Song song meanings
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4 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentIt seems Toad has so many themes of literature in their music. This one is the immortal nightengale that runs throughout the history of literature. The nightengale's timeless song. Does anyone know of any other literature themes in toad songs?
    Soundboyon October 13, 2004   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song makes me think of the chapter in the Silmarillion, Of Beren and Luthien. Beren was a human who heard the Elf maiden Luthien singing. He called her the Elven word for Nightingale, Tinúviel. Her father did not approve of thier love ans sent Beren after a Simaril from the crown of Morgoth. Beren nearly died, but he retrieved it and married Luthien.
    If you read the whole thing you will see it better than in my summary.
    purejoys_darknesson February 01, 2005   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song may be short and sweet, but it's potent and very amazing nonetheless.
    lemontwiston September 02, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commentpurejoys darkness mentions the story of Luthien and Beren. Toad The Wet Sprocket has actually made reference to Tolkien's work before; 'Hobbit on the Rocks,' anyone?

    However, if you'd elaborated a little more you'd see more connections:

    Lúthien was the daughter of King Thingol. Thingol disliked Beren and set an 'impossible' task that Beren had to do before he could wed Lúthien.
    Beren had to wrest a Silmaril from the crown of Morgoth. Morgoth is the rough equivalent of ultimate evil/Satan in the context of the series (Sauron served him) and he had bound the three fairest jewels, the Silmarils, into his crown. The Silmarils are so beautiful that unbelievable amounts of blood are shed for them because of the greed they inspire.

    Beren set out, and Lúthien followed him. Beren was captured, as was Luthien. However, Luthien escaped with help and freed Beren. Together, they retrieved one of the Silmarils through unbelievable peril using Luthien's magic, but a werewolf devoured the hand of Beren that held the Silmaril as they escaped.

    Thingol accepted Beren and Luthien's love at this point, but Beren had to retrieve the Silmaril. Beren succeeds, but pays for it with his life. Luthien perishes in despair.

    Luthien comes to the Halls of Mandos (a god-like figure) in the West/Undying Land. Mandos is moved by her grief, and gives Beren and Luthien a mortal life, that they might have a chance to be together. 'Mortality' in Tolkien's series is often referred to as 'the Gift of Men.'

    Eärendil married Elwing, granddaughter of the son of Beren and Lúthien. Elrond is their son, and Arwen their granddaughter.
    Elwing had the Silmaril that Beren had retrieved. While Eärendil was at sea, Elwing threw herself with the Silmaril into the sea to keep violent people from coveting it. She was borne to Eärendil's ship, and he begged the Valar (basically gods) for help.
    Now, Eärendil sails the skies, the Silmaril upon his brow. This is the 'most beloved star' that Galadriel refers to; the light that Frodo receives in the phial is from the Silmaril!

    In The Lord of the Rings, Arwen is kin to Luthien, and Arwen and Aragorn walk the path of Luthien and Beren. And when Aragorn dies, so too does Arwen.


    With the story in mind, look at the lyrics again:
    "We sing the nightingale song alive
    We might be different but our hearts won't lie...
    ...And little ever changes if anything at all
    But the song rings loudly through these halls..." (halls of Mandos?)

    "And little ever changes when you view it from the sky
    And the damage we encounter the earth just passes by
    And little ever changes if anything at all
    And we remind ourselves how small we are"


    I don't know if this is Toad the Wet Sprocket's intention, but it is certainly compelling. And regardless it is a beautiful story and a beautiful song.
    Gaawachanon September 19, 2011   Link

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