"Gold" as written by Alexander Junior Grant, Daniel Coulter Reynolds, Daniel Wayne Sermon, Benjamin Arthur Mckee and Daniel Platzman....
First comes the blessing of all that you've dreamed
But then comes the curses of diamonds and rings
Only at first did it have its appeal
But now you can't tell the false from the real
Who can you trust?
(Who can you trust)

When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold, gold
When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold
(Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah)

Statues and empires are all at your hands,
Water to wine and the finest of sands
When all that you have's turnin' stale and its cold,
Oh you'll no longer fear when your heart's turned to gold
Who can you trust
(Who can you trust)

When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold, gold
When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold
(Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah)

I'm dying to feel again,
Oh anything at all,
But oh I feel nothin', nothin', nothin', nothin' at all

When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold, gold
When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold
(Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah
Ooh, gold, woah)


Lyrics submitted by PsychoTrain

"Gold" as written by Benjamin Arthur Mckee Alexander Junior Grant

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Gold song meanings
Add your thoughts

6 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +2
    My InterpretationThere's also a reference to King Midas in this song ("When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold, gold").
    seeingon December 27, 2014   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationI believe this song is talking about being famous, and how everything is not as it seems.

    "First comes the blessing of all that you dreamed
    But then comes the curses of diamonds and rings
    Only at first did it have its appeal
    But now you can’t tell the false from the real"

    To me these lyrics in specific talk about the misleading towards becoming famous, as "the curses of diamonds and rings" talks about how you have too much money than you know what to do with. "But now you can't tell the false from the real" to me sounds like love, and how when you become famous, you can never tell when someone loves you, or if they're in love with your fame or money.

    "Statues and empires are all at your hands
    Water to wine and the finest of sands
    When all that you have’s turnin’ stale and it’s cold
    Oh, you no longer fear when your heart’s turned to gold

    Who can you trust?
    Who can you trust?"

    These lyrics to me also speak in a way that "when all that you have's turnin stale and it's cold" means that after a while the fame and money begins to wear on you and you are no longer happy, and "you no longer fear when you heart is turned to gold" is talking about how you cannot go back to your old self, because you're so used to having everything.

    "Who can you trust?" Is another example of who can you trust to really love you, or really be your friend.
    PsychoTrainon December 21, 2014   Link
  • +1
    Song MeaningAt it’s core, the song is based on the Greek myth of King Midas, who wished for the power to turn what he touched into gold. Midas’ wish turned out to be more of a curse than a blessing, since he accidentally turned his food and his daughter into gold.
    In the song, Imagine Dragons uses this myth to build on the idea of fame and the wealth that comes with it.

    1) “First comes the blessing of all that you’ve dreamed, / But then comes the curses of diamonds and rings. / Only at first did it have its appeal, but now you can’t tell the false from the real. / Who can you trust (Who can you trust)”

    In Midas’ case, the “blessing of all that [he’s] dreamed” is his wish to turn what he touches into gold, which only appealed “at first.” In the real-world application, many “dream” of being blessed with fame and wealth. Imagine Dragons, now at a position of fame and fortune, attest that the “diamonds and rings” become “curses” in the same way Midas’ ability became a curse, separating him from those he loved. Fame and fortune may have “appeal” at first, but once achieved, it’s hard to distinguish those who are genuine from those who are “false,” leaving the famous struggling to figure out who to “trust.”

    2) “Statues and empires are all at your hands, / Water to wine and the finest of sands. / When all that you have’s turning stale and its cold, / Oh you’ll no longer fear when your heart’s turned to gold. / Who can you trust (Who can you trust)”

    Statues, empires, water, wine, sands–all that’s listed here seems desirable, but none of it involves a personal relationship, which is what Midas really wanted in the end (at least, he wanted to restore his relationship with his daughter–we’ll generalize it for the song’s sake). Statues are just echos of things that live. Having “empires…at your hands” implies a position of glory, but what’s the point of holding power over so many people if your position depends on people seeing you as superior and untouchable? Turning “water to wine” is a biblical allusion to Jesus’ first miracle during his ministry in which he turned water into wine at a wedding. It’s a powerful allusion for this song because it parallels Midas’ ability to turn what he touches into gold. The line could also be interpreted as having everything from “water to wine,” which would fit into the list of desirable things that don’t involve personal relationships. “The finest of sands” could symbolize having lots of time, since sand measures time in hourglasses and having lots of time isn’t much good if you don’t have someone to spend it with.

    The lyrics go on to say when all these material items turn “stale” (when you no longer take pleasure in them) and when “it’s cold” (when you feel like you’ve reached your end), you’ll welcome the transformation of your heart into gold. I can see why people may interpret this transformation as an individual accepting this infectious need for materialism and giving in to the worldly people around him, but I don’t think that fits the rest of the song. Rather, I think the transformation of the heart into gold signifies the heart becoming hollow and the individual becoming numb to his own emotions.

    For more analysis of "Gold" and other Imagine Dragons songs, check out my blog, toriphelps.wordpress.com
    misstori123on March 13, 2015   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationThe song is referring to King Midas in its chorus. As the myth goes, Midas wished for everything he touched to be turned to gold. For a while, this was good, until it got bad, and he turned everything he loved to gold.

    In the song, it is a similar situation. The band has recently become popular due to smash hits such as "Radioactive" and "I Bet My Life". By comparing Midas' life to his own, the artist is telling how becoming famous wasn't all he thought it would be.

    "First comes the blessing of all that you've dreamed
    But then comes the curses of diamonds and rings,"

    The first verse is referring to how when first becoming famous, he was over the moon. However, after a while, things took a turn for the worst.

    "Only at first did it have its appeal
    But now you can't tell the false from the real,"

    Only at first was being famous fun, but now, people are using him for their own personal gain, and it is difficult to tell who genuinely cares about him and who doesn't.

    "Who can you trust,
    When everything, everything, everything you touch turns to gold, gold, gold?"

    The chorus tells that the artist cannot trust anyone, or feels this way, because everyone wants to be associated with him. This is where the reference to King Midas comes in. Everything Midas touched turned to gold, and he hated it. This is how the writer feels. Even though being famous is supposed to be amusing, it turns out to be awful.

    "Statues and empires are all at your hands,
    Water to wine and the finest of sands,"

    When Midas was king, he had everything he wanted. While the singer is famous, he also gets everything he wants.

    "When all that you have's turnin' stale and its cold,
    Oh you'll no longer fear when your heart's turned to gold,"

    This is where the artist starts telling us that because of his new found fame, he has turned in someone he doesn't want to be-a heartless man. All he had before the fame was his emotions, and all that has turned cold. So he tried re spark them, but in the process "turned his heart to gold, just like everything else.

    "I'm dying to feel again,
    Oh anything at all,
    But oh I feel nothin', nothin', nothin', nothin',"

    Finally, the bridge is him telling us he doesn't want to be like this any longer, and he wants to feel anything, even bad emotions like sadness, anger, or confusion. But even those are beyond his reach.

    In the end, this song is comparing King Midas the the singer, and how they both lost touch with themselves over something they both deeply wanted. These obsessions turned them into heartless creatures incapable of emotion. And in the end, they both regretted their decision, but could do nothing about it, and lived the rest of their lives in sorrow.
    Wiltbergeron April 28, 2015   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationTo me, this song relates to famous or rich people such as in the first verse. It states that being known and having benefits of having everything given to you is nice until you wish you had a relationship with someone true instead of someone who is fake and only likes you for your money. "Now you can't tell the false from the real." As in the fake people who wish to be your friend for your money not your true self. The man/woman who is wishing to feel again is struggling to find someone to love/feel for and begin something that is not materialized because they have became old and dull and they are wishing for something much more than money can buy, love.
    DJTorch26on February 09, 2015   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis definitely touches upon the greed problem. Greed is a da genius thing. So this song talks about someone who is new to wealth. It seems wonderful, so much money, nothing can go wrong. But once he is used to the wealth, he wants more. A lot more. And he becomes protective of his money. Paranoid even. Any friend becomes s for for no reason other than his worry for his wealth. And with his lust for more, he dies terrible things, becomes s different person.
    codfpon February 20, 2015   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain