I was holding my breath,
When the tightrope walker,
Slipped into the moonglow,
Saying all my children follow me,
Maybe it’s time to go.

You can be chrome when you’re wise,
Can be wise when you’re blue,
And baby if I have,
Then I have for you .

Bribing the jury to keep me in jail,
Singing tea for the Tillerman,
And although I lie fantastically,
I swore an oath on my history,
It’s a miracle I can see.

You can be wrong when you’re right,
Even when you’re right on cue,
And if I die tonight,
Then I die for you.

Calling on those that call me son,
Great-grandson or grandson,
Great uncles, aunts and relatives,
To judge what I have done,
Gonna make right by you,
Even if it’s all I do,
And if it’s all I do, then I do for you.

People will raise a whole lotta hell,
About the water and the windmill,
And although I stab chaotically,
It hurts no one but me,
Even the darkness has arms,
But it ain’t got you,
Baby I have it and I have you too.

And a light in the window,
To pass the night through,
May be so uncertain but what can I do,
Keepin’ it on, keepin’ it on,
And I know I like it but,
What does that prove?
Sometimes I worry I don’t know,
How to love you.

I bring to you with reverent hands,
All the books that my love abides,
Kind woman that my passion wore,
Like the shoreline wears the tides,
Maybe the water went dry,
Keeping an eye on you,
And with an eye on you,
It could drown me too.

People will raise a whole lotta hell,
About the water and the windmill,
And although I stab chaotically,
I swore an oath on my history,
It’s a miracle I can see,
Even the darkness has arms,
But they ain’t got you,
Baby I have it and I have you too.

And a light in the window,
To pass the night through,
May be so uncertain but what can I do,
Keepin’ it on, keepin’ it on,
And I know I like it but,
What does that prove?
Sometimes I worry I don’t know,
How to love you.



Lyrics submitted by Cyberghost

Even The Darkness Has Arms song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentI think it is about someone who cheated on their significant other, but is absolutely madly in love with her and feels horrible for what he has done. All he wants to do is make her feel better and do right by her. He is trying to figure out the right way to love her because he knows he doesn't do it right. He compares his wrong-doings to the darkness having arms, and her as being pure (they ain't got you). But he saying "but I have you too" shows his astonishment that he still has someone so pure and beautiful even after what he has done. The song is hope for the future. Maybe in the future, the darkness will loosen its grip on him--Things will be okay, he will do right by her and they will be happy.
    tailarjohnsonon November 09, 2015   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationI think it's about like finding what's good in what's bad. "Even the darkness has arms" seeing that mostly Hugs make us feel better, finding a hug from what's bad will make us feel better about it.
    Hippiesheepon May 06, 2017   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the song is a coming-of-age story. Yes, the writer is in love with a woman. But I think more importantly the writer is struggling to find himself in relation to his ancestors and his book learning and his lover. HIs lover, (perhaps) his most intimate relationship poses the greatest risk to his becoming. "Maybe the water went dry / Keeping an eye on you / And with an eye on you, it could drown me too…” But the water doesn’t drown him, it gives him life. 

    The book learning key line; “I bring to you with reverand hands / All the books that my love abides…” Books are at least as cathartic as music. In a different way. I think the writer has an intimate relationship with books. The tightrope walker in the first lines of the song is probably a reference to Nietzches’ tightrope walker. I think Nietzche’s hero, Zarathustra’s primary goal in Thus Spoke Z is to be a trusted, wise leader of the common people (I never finished the book). This is not my blog, it’s just a convenient google search:
    theilluminatedshowman.blogspot.com/2012/08/…

    Zarathustra, speaking about the tightrope walker: "Man is a rope, tied between beast and overman—a rope over an abyss. A dangerous across, a dangerous on-the-way, a dangerous looking-back, a dangerous shuddering and stopping. What is great in man is that he is a bridge and not an end: what can be loved in man is that he is an overture and a going under. I love those who do not know how to live, except by going under, for they are those who cross over.“

    Nietzche: "No one can build you the bridge on which you, and only you, must cross the river of life. There may be countless trails and bridges and demigods who would gladly carry you across; but only at the price of pawning and forgoing yourself. There is one path in the world that none can walk but you. Where does it lead? Don’t ask, walk!"

    “People will raise a whole lot of hell about / The water and the wind-mill” is a clear reference to Don Quixote tilting at windmills. Quixote thought the windmills were giants and he either fought them or wanted to fight them (I never read the book). He didn’t realize his giants (his enemies or his sins or his doubts or his self loathings) weren’t real, they only existed in his head. The writer is "stabbing quixotically” at his ancestor giants, those who gave him the gift (and the burden) of becoming his own full self.

    Barr brothers: “You can be chrome when you’re wise / Can be wise when you’re blue…” The down times are the most instructive times if one can plow them in, work them in, letting the down times feed the soul instead of poison it. One must go under, or over, in order to grow. 

    Ultimately the song is positive and forward-looking. “A light in the window / To pass the night through … Keeping it on, keeping it on…” The writer is thinking too much about what he is instead of living into whatever is already.

    Thanks for posting. Peace.
    phil108197on November 12, 2017   Link

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