"Nara" as written by and Joe Newman Thomas Green....
Soon
I'm gonna marry a man like no other
Light the fuse, hallelujah, hallelujah

Love, love is the warmest color
Petrol blues, hallelujah, hallelujah
Comes, saut dans le vide, my lover
In my youth the greatest tide washed up my prize

You.

Follow, let him go, let him lead me be
Love is a pharaoh, and in front of me
I thought let him be where he want to be
Love is a pharaoh and he's boning me

I've discovered a man like no other man
I've discovered a man like no other man
I've discovered a man like no other man
I've found a love to love like no other can

Ah ooh
Ah ooh
I've found a love to love like no other can

He's found me, my Aslan

Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama
Marry a man like no other

Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama
Love is the warmest color

Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama
Unpin your butterflies, Russia

Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama
To be a deer in Nara

Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama
Hallelujah, Bovay, Alabama


Lyrics submitted by SongMeanings, edited by SilentAssassin

"Nara" as written by Joe Newman Augustus Unger Hamilton

Lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

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Nara song meanings
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9 Comments

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  • +7
    General CommentIt's a song about being homosexual and facing discrimination, and wanting to run away, to "be a deer in Nara". (incidentally, Nara is in this case city in japan where deer are treated as godlike creatures).
    The song also mentions sources of homophobia, such as:
    - Alabama, an extremely conservative US state,
    - Alvan E. Bovay (the founder of the Republican party), and
    - "Hallelujah", a nod to a religious source of prejudice, as a conduit of protest toward needless and unrequited hate.
    Their lyrics "I've discovered a man like no other man" and "unpin your butterflies Russia" (reference to Russia's vehement discrimination of homosexuals, as evidenced by the recent Olympic Games, with "butterflies" representing the LGBT community) really drive home that point.
    hokealogenouson October 02, 2014   Link
  • +2
    Translation"Saut dans le vide" means "leap into the void." I'm not sure if this is significant but those words are the title of a photo by Yves Klein. Maybe they just thought the french sounded better or maybe the line in french is referencing the photo
    Batkat4444on September 24, 2014   Link
  • +1
    General Comment@SpiderSoldier I don't understand, do you mean to right to vote on whether or not homosexual marriage should be allowed? If that's your viewpoint, I'm afraid you're behind the times, the world is coming out of it's cocoon, having realised that prejudice and injustice is not the way to go.
    If that's not your viewpoint, then please elucidate for me
    hokealogenouson January 15, 2015   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI like how this song brings together religion and homosexuality. The name and chorus of this song sounds like a song can be sung at church. I think it also suggests that homosexuality is something that God gives to you, like a blessing you should thank god for.
    PromiseGon November 03, 2014   Link
  • 0
    MemoryI loved this song from when I first heard it and when I read hokealogenous's interpretation of it, it got instantly more powerful for me.
    Solaris604on September 21, 2015   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with the rest of the comments and had a quick look but nobody seems to mention the aslan line.
    "he's found me, my Aslan"
    Alice.on January 28, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with the rest of the comments and had a quick look but nobody seems to mention the aslan line.
    "he's found me, my Aslan"
    Along with the religious feel of the song tempo and obviously the "hallelujah" it all works nicely together. Aslan being the god figure in the narnia series. Perhaps as well as talking about struggling with homophobia and prejudice he is also idolizing the man he's found and holding him up as his own figurehead of all that is good and protective and juxtaposing him with all the horrendous cases of institutionalized homophobia.
    Alice.on January 28, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with the rest of the comments and had a quick look but nobody seems to mention the aslan line.
    "he's found me, my Aslan"
    Along with the religious feel of the song tempo and obviously the "hallelujah" it all works nicely together. Aslan being the god figure in the narnia series. Perhaps as well as talking about struggling with homophobia and prejudice he is also idolizing the man he's found and holding him up as his own figurehead of all that is good and protective and juxtaposing him with all the horrendous cases of institutionalized homophobia.
    Alice.on January 28, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with the rest of the comments and had a quick look but nobody seems to mention the aslan line.
    "he's found me, my Aslan"
    Along with the religious feel of the song tempo and obviously the "hallelujah" it all works nicely together. Aslan being the god figure in the narnia series. Perhaps as well as talking about struggling with homophobia and prejudice he is also idolizing the man he's found and holding him up as his own figurehead of all that is good and protective and juxtaposing him with all the horrendous cases of institutionalized homophobia.
    Alice.on January 28, 2016   Link

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