"Poet" as written by and Daniel Smith....
Obsession it takes control,
Obsession it eats me whole.
I can't say the words out loud,
So in a rhyme I wrote you down.
Now you'll live through the ages,
I can feel your pulse in the pages.

I have written you down
Now you will live forever
And all the world will read you
And you will live forever
In eyes not yet created
On tongues that are not born
I have written you down
Now you will live forever

Your body lies upon the sheet,
Of paper and words so sweet.
I can't say the words,
so I wrote you into my verse.
Now you'll live through the ages,
I can feel your pulse in the pages.

I have written you down
Now you will live forever
And all the world will read you,
And you will live forever
In eyes not yet created
On tongues that are not born
I have written you down
Now you will live forever

I have read her with these eyes,
I've read her with these eyes,
I have held her in these hands.

I have written you down,
Now you will live forever.
The virtues in the verse,
And you will live forever.

I have written you down
Now you will live forever
And all the world will read you
And you will live forever
In eyes not yet created
On tongues that are not born
I have written you down
Now you will live forever


Lyrics submitted by Jac93

"Poet" as written by Daniel Smith

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Poet song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • +5
    Song MeaningThe song 'Poet' is based on Sonnet 18 by William Shakespeare . Dan from Bastille revealed this in a Q&A on twitter (no link, sorry).
    The Song goes along the lines of loving someone to the point of obsession, but saying the words out loud won't make them last forever.

    If he were to write down how he feels and express his love through poems or letters, it will live on forever as long as people are still around to read - 'In eyes not yet created, On tongues that are not born, I have written you down, Now you will live forever'.


    Very beautiful song - My favourite
    jse9on December 09, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYes jse9 is right - I have not seen that interview but the song is clearly inspired by Shakespeare's 81st sonnet, part of which goes:

    Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
    Which eyes not yet created shall o'er-read,
    And tongues to be your being shall rehearse
    When all the breathers of this world are dead
    dragonfly001on March 23, 2014   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationTo understand this song, look at Shakespeare’s Sonnet 81.

    Or I shall live your epitaph to make,
    Or you survive when I in earth am rotten;
    From hence your memory death cannot take,
    Although in me each part will be forgotten.
    Your name from hence immortal life shall have,
    Though I, once gone, to all the world must die:
    The earth can yield me but a common grave,
    When you entombed in men’s eyes shall lie.
    Your monument shall be my gentle verse,
    Which eyes not yet created shall o’er-read,
    And tongues to be your being shall rehearse,
    When all the breathers of this world are dead;
    You still shall live (such virtue hath my pen)
    Where breath most breathes, even in the mouths of men.

    Recognize anything?

    Any band who bases a song off a Shakespearean sonnet (one that holds words in high esteem, no less) deserves a Grammy in my book. I can’t grovel forever, though; let’s look at other reasons to love this song.

    1) “Obsession it takes control, / Obsession it eats me whole. / I can’t say the words out loud, / So in a rhyme I wrote you down. / Now you’ll live through the ages, / I can feel your pulse in the pages.”

    The speaker, who is eaten up with his love for “you,” couldn’t bring himself to say anything “out loud,” so he wrote them down, ensuring “you” will “live through the ages,” since words last longer than people (Shakespeare’s words in particular). The idea of words preserving life is a beautiful one emphasized in the concept of epitaphs and obituaries as well as the line “I can feel your pulse in the pages.”

    2) “I have written you down / Now you will live forever / And all the world will read you / And you will live forever / In eyes not yet created / On tongues that are not born / I have written you down / Now you will live forever.”

    This mimics the lines “Which eyes not yet created shall o’er-read, / And tongues to be your being shall rehearse, / When all the breathers of this world are dead; / You still shall live (such virtue hath my pen).” I’m glad Bastille simplified it, though; it’d be hard to sing lines like “tongues to be your being shall rehearse.” In any case, this chorus serves to emphasize the idea that writing the subject down will preserve a part of her.

    3) “Your body lies upon the sheets, / Of paper and words so sweet. / I can’t say the words, / so I wrote you into my verse. / Now you’ll live through the ages, / I can feel your pulse in the pages.”

    The first line plays with the word “sheets,” which can mean both bedsheets (scandalous) and sheets “of paper and words so sweet.” The subject may not be literally lying on papers, but she could be lying on bedsheets, and part of her is preserved in the paper on which the song/poem is printed. The other lines should sound familiar, since they repeat those of the first part.

    4) “I have read her with these eyes, / I’ve read her with these eyes, / I have held her in these hands.”

    The speaker remains ambiguous, allowing readers/listeners to judge whether he’s referring to his love, his poem, or both. He has read the poem, and in reading the poem he has read “her.” It’s also possible to “read” a person to figure out how they feel. The next line is ambiguous, too, since he can both hold “her” and the poem/song. The ambiguity of this section is its strongest feature.

    5) “I have written you down, / Now you will live forever. / The virtue’s in the verse, / And you will live forever.”

    I almost didn’t include this section, since it mostly repeated what had already been discussed, but then I read sonnet 81 again. The line “the virtue’s in the verse” is a nod to Shakespeare’s poem when he writes “(such virtue hath my pen).” In fact, I think the whole song is a nod to Shakespeare. I mean, the title’s not “Words,” “Poem,” or even “Sonnet 81;” Bastille titled this song “Poet.”

    Just when I thought I couldn’t like this band any more than I already do…

    For more song lyric analyses, check out my blog at toriphelps.wordpress.com
    misstori123on March 27, 2015   Link

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