"It's Never Over (Oh Orpheus)" as written by Win Butler, Regine Chassagne, William Butler, Richard R Parry, Jeremy Gara and Tim Kingsbury....
Hey, Orpheus!
I'm behind you
Don't turn around
I can find you

Just wait until it's over
Wait until it's through
And if I call for you
Oh, Orpheus!
Just sing for me all night
We'll wait until it's over
Wait until it's through

You say it's not me, it's you

Hey, Orpheus!
De l'autre côté de l'eau
Comme un écho
Just wait until it's over
Wait until it's through

And if I shout for you
Never doubt
Don't turn around too soon
Just wait until it's over
Wait until it's through

It seems so important now
But you will get over
Seems so important now
But you will get over
And when you get over
And when you get older
Then you will remember
Why it was so important then

Seems like a big deal now
But you will get over
Seems like a big deal now
You will get over
When you get over
When you get older
Then you will discover
That it's never over

Hey, Eurydice!
Can you see me?
I will sing your name
Till you're sick of me
Just wait until it's over
Just wait until it's through

And if you call for me
This frozen sea
It melts beneath me
Just wait until it's over
Wait until it's through

Seems like a big deal now
You will get over
Seems like a big deal now
You will get over
And when you get over
When you get older
You will remember

He told you he'd wake you up
When it was over
He told you he'd wake you up
When it was over
Now that it's over
Now that you're older
Then you will discover

It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)

Sometime (Sometime)
Sometime (Sometime)
Boy, they're gonna eat you alive (eat you alive)
But it's never gonna happen now
We'll figure it out somehow

Sometime (Sometime)
Sometime (Sometime)
Boy, they're gonna eat you alive (eat you alive)
But it's never gonna happen now
We'll figure it out somehow

'Cause it's never over
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)
And it's never over (it's never over)
It's never over (it's never over)

We stood beside
A frozen sea
I saw you out
In front of me
Reflected light
A hollow moon
Oh Orpheus, Eurydice
Its over too soon


Lyrics submitted by jtk1993, edited by Mellow_Harsher, niteflite01, AwfulSound

"It's Never Over (Hey Orpheus)" as written by Regine Chassagne Jeremy Gara

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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It's Never Over (Oh Orpheus) song meanings
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15 Comments

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  • +12
    My InterpretationOrpheus is a figure in Greek mythology; a musician whose capabilities are so masterful that he is said to have brought his deceased wife Eurydice back to life, after entering Hades to rescue her and charming all he meets along the way with his music and song.

    The Gods allow him to rescue her on the condition that she walks behind him and that he does not look back at her until they have left Hades. Unfortunately, just as they leave Hades he forgets, overcome with joy, and turns to look at Eurydice, condemning her to Hades for eternity. Orpheus never has relations with another woman, remaining heartbroken forever.

    Indeed therefore it is Eurydice who provides the viewpoint from which the first few verses of this song are sung. Orpheus finally takes over the protagonists role in the verse "Hey, Eurydice! / Can you see me? / I will sing your name / Until you're sick of me".

    The lines in the second verse, "De l'autre côté de l'eau/ Comme un écho" translate approximately to "On the other side of the water / Like an echo" which probably refers to River Styx, part of the Orpheus/Eurydice story, a river (Styx comes from the Greek word stugein which means"hate") which marks the boundary between the living and the dead and which encircles Hades. Here Eurydice waited, weeping, for Orpheus to rescue her, and latterly the river would provide the block to him returning to rescue her a second time.

    This verse also encompasses one of the recurring themes on Reflektor; the thin pane of glass or mirror like state of being that exists between the living and the dead. This is also referred to here and in other tracks as the frozen sea, mirror-like and reflective.

    The chorus lines "Seems like a big deal now / But you will get over" and "It seems so important now / But you will get over" provide comfort musically and lyrically. Reassurance. Perhaps that is Eurydice reassuring Orpheus from beyond the grave. Or perhaps in these parts of the song Win is singing to Regine or to himself. Perhaps the band and being on the road and part of the music industry machine seems so important now, but now that they have a family perhaps it's time to "get over it" and leave it behind.
    niteflite01on October 26, 2013   Link
  • +7
    My OpinionThe last 30 seconds is the most beautiful part of this entire album.
    josephneelyon October 26, 2013   Link
  • +4
    General CommentWin is Orpheus, Regine is Eurydice.

    The story of Orpheus is about a musician who travels to the underworld to rescue his wife, but he turns to look back at her too soon and she's sucked back into Hades.

    I think "It's Never Over (Oh Orpheus)" and "Awful Sound (Oh Eurydice)" connect in a way with the next track: "Porno." The first two are very romantic and dramatic and reference great mythical stories of rescue- whereas the last is about the narrator's helpless anger about his wife being objectified and mocked for her gender. He can't rescue her- there's no Hades for him to descend into and then try to escape from. There's just a bunch of assholes whose vocabulary consists mostly of wolf-whistling and "nice tits!" It's a painfully mundane problem that can't really be solved.
    Crane42on November 03, 2013   Link
  • +4
    My InterpretationAs many people have said, this tells the Orpheus and Eurydice, but I’ve read it completely differently to a lot of the responses here, so thought I’d share my opinion – I’ll do my best to explain.

    Firstly, I see most of the 2nd disc of Reflektor as a break-up record, particularly Afterlife, Supersymmetry, and this track – just to clarify though, I don’t think Regine and Win are breaking up, but they’re telling the story of a couple that are.

    Whenever I hear this song (which is my favourite from the album) I see the ascent of Orpheus and Eurydice from Hades as the final few fateful moments of a doomed relationship (be they minutes, hours, days or years) – Regine’s (or Eurydice’s) constant reminder of her situation, and her reliance on him to survive ( “I’m behind you/Don’t turn around, I can find you”, “And if I call for you, oh Orpheus/ Just sing for me, all night”) is countered by Win’s (or Orpheus’) reassurance ( “Just wait until it’s over/Wait until it’s through” ) a constant in the opening verse.

    Regine begins to sound more frantic as the song continues. From “De l'autre côté de l'eau, comme un écho” onwards, it’s almost as if the realisation that Orpheus is leaving her in Hades – and that the power is entirely in his hands.

    Then there are the calmer sections, which act as a breath of release from the intense nature of the rest of the song. (“It seems so important now, but you will get over”) Like with all forms of loss, time will make it better (“And when you get over, and when you get older, you will remember, why it was so important now”)

    We’re snapped away from this moment of clarity at 3:30, when Win counters Regine’s original request to sing his name “I will sing your name, till you’re sick of me”. He can no longer be the reassuring person he needs to be, this is complimented by Regine’s echoes. The “wait until it’s over, wait until it’s through” that punctuates this section is his moral dilemma of turning around; of ending the relationship – he’s reassuring himself as much as Regine.

    Looking at this through the lens of the final stages of a relationship, “It’s never over” refers to Win’s original comment to “wait until it’s over, wait until it’s through” – just as the Orpheus must turn to see Eurydice, this doomed relationship must end, else it’d continue in this purgatorial state indefinitely.

    Like most of Reflektor, this whole song is a repeated reflection, like two mirrors facing each other.

    The lyrics start out as a pure reflection:
    Regine sings a line
    Win sings a line
    Regine
    Win

    But eventually, after the break at about 2:50, the reflections become more distorted, singing over one another.

    There’s also the inclusion of popular break-up line “You say it’s not me it’s you”

    This theory compliments the progression of the rest of the disc – Porno, into Afterlife (which, in my opinion, is about life after the end of a relationship).

    Well, those are my thoughts – I rarely feel this strongly about the meanings behind a song, and have never posted here before, but thought I’d share!
    jamesg123on January 06, 2014   Link
  • +1
    My InterpretationI can't help but think of Jeff Buckley's excellent Lover, You Should Have Come Over when I hear this song. Especially the lines:

    It's never over, my kingdom for a kiss upon her shoulder
    It's never over, all my riches for her smiles when i slept so soft against her
    It's never over, all my blood for the sweetness of her laughter
    It's never over, she's the tear that hangs inside my soul forever

    The idea that even though your lover has passed, you wish more than anything that you could keep the whole thing going. This is the exact same feeling Orpheus has as he hopes to bring Eurydices into the overworld...the idea that he can resist love's drawl long enough to survive the journey....but he can't. He would give anything to see her face again that moment....and the suspense is killing him.

    Maybe I'm wrong...but that's where I'm at with this song.
    BuckWilderon November 02, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI think its undoubtedly about the story of orheus and uerydice and their ascent from hades, but in a more meaningful way reflects how time passes so slowly while its happening to you, but looking back on everythings thats happened you realize its over too soon. Euryddice and Orpheus had a hard time, but looking back on it they realize even the horrible ascent from the depths of hell were worth something, and even that ended too soon, even though it drags on forever when its going on in your life. It says, things may drag on and be awful and you may be in hell trying to get out, it may seem like "its never over", but if you apreciate every second of your life youll realize its all passed you by and it was over too soon.
    0au5t1non November 09, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAlso fits with seems like a big deal now, but you will get over, when you get older, like going through school may be hell to you and seem to last an eternity but when your done it feels like it zoomed right by and it was over too soon because you never got to appreciate all the happy things. Favorite song on the album.
    0au5t1non November 09, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General CommentFor anyone who doesn't know the Orpheus myth:

    Orpheus, the most talented musician of his time, falls in love with Eurydice, the oak nymph. Orpheus and Eurydice are wed. During the wedding, a stayr pursues Eurydice. She fights off his advances by running away. During her escape, she steps on a poisonous snake and dies as soon as the snake bites her. Orpheus discovers her body and immediately becomes emo, playing only the saddest songs that make gods, nymphs and men cry. Upon the suggestion of other myths, he goes to the Underworld to convince the king (Hades) and queen (Persephone) of the underworld to free Eurydice.

    Orpheus played a very sad song for Hades and Persephonre, and softens their hearts to the point where they agree to free Eurydice from death under the following condition: He had to lead Eurydice through the underworld and could not look back to see her until they reached the world of the living. He fails when he grows impatient and turns back to look upon his lover right before they reach the surface. Eurydice is then sucked back into the Underworld and Orpheus has no chance of recovering her again.

    As a result, Orpheus is forced to live out his tragic life due to his mistake.

    In any case, I believe this song uses the Orpheus myth to convey the feeling of loss. While we can't always control our loss, (such as the death of a loved one from natural causes, cancer, etc.) everyone experiences loss from their decisions. Orpheus decided to look at Eurydice before they reached the world of the living. As soon as he did it, he lost her forever.

    This song illustrates the constant pain we feel from that nature of that loss. The feeling that loss is a direct consequence of your actions. This song hints that the pain will go away, but reveals that "It's never over." We have to live with our destructive decisions for the rest of our lives.
    quickwitboyon November 28, 2013   Link
  • 0
    Song FactAlso the line "Boy, they're gonna eat you alive" refers to the death of Orpheus.

    Orpheus was torn apart by a group of women called Maenads under the orders of Dionysus, after Orpheus had renounced all gods but Apollo.

    Dionysus was the Greek god of the grape harvest, winemaking and wine, of ritual madness and ecstasy.

    Apollo, Orpheus' only god, was a god of light, the sun, truth, prophecy, healing, plague, music and poetry.
    niteflite01on October 29, 2013   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationCould mean anything in life, really. We worry about all these things in our lives and it seems like the worrying never stops, but when we grow older and come closer to death, we realize life is over so soon. As a homo sapien, we have such a short but beautiful glimpse of the universe. Don't spend you're whole life looking for meaning/happiness, when in the end, you can't look back and say you're proud of what you had accomplished in your life.

    "Oh Orpheus/Euridyce, it's over too soon."
    eliasriegson November 17, 2013   Link

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