"Plato's Tripartite" as written by and Rody Walker Cam Mclellan....
I forgot to thank you for the blood you shed,
And your obligatory contribution to the community.
Are you just dense or so fuckin’ inbred
You think that all is forgiven and all is forgotten?
But forgive them of nothing, despite their impunity.

Oh how the system fails you completely
When monstrous children get treated so sweetly.
The violence is praised, the decision cemented
(they seem like nice kids).
Crimes go committed, but never lamented
(that doesn’t change what they did).

That’s when they lock up an innocent victim.
The only thing that’s more broken than her spirit is the system.
They lock up femininity, infected with the illusion that choice is free.

You made your bed when you were born in your bones,
So lay back, sweetheart, in a body you only sometimes own.
Lay back upon cold concrete floors and rest your drunken soul.
What more could a lady ask for than to be treated like a hole?

Oh how the system fails you completely
When monstrous children get treated so sweetly.
Standing before you in suit and tie,
Don’t they just look so nice? (So nice)
Well-practiced tears come to their eyes,
“I guess their remorse will suffice.” (Will suffice)

That’s when they lock up,
That’s when they lock up your bones,
That’s when they lock up,
Femininity infected with the illusion that choice, choice is

Freedom is delicate, cracking under abject catastrophe.
Stronger than his prison bars are the bars around her memory.
[x2]

It’s irrelevant, her relation to me.
No one is innocent if they go free.
No one is innocent if they go free.
When we hand raise the beast, and the beast runs wild,
We must speak of our own involvement in the rape of a child.

It’s irrelevant, her relation to me.
No one is innocent if they go free.
No one is innocent if they go free.
That’s when they lock up,
That’s when they lock up your bones,
That’s when they lock up,
Femininity infected with the illusion that choice, choice is


Lyrics submitted by TUNDRA35, edited by wolfblitzer

"Plato's Tripartite" as written by Rody Walker Cam Mclellan

Lyrics © COINFISH PUBLISHING

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Plato's Tripartite song meanings
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  • +11
    Song MeaningThis song is clearly about cases like the one regarding Daisy Coleman, where the victims of rape are turned into the villains and the monsters that commit the act aren't held responsible for their actions.

    First he calls out the community of Maryville for their blatant and disturbing idea that what they did was right and that everyone should "mind their own business."

    Then he calls out the failure of the legal system to uphold justice. The children, the ones who were responsible for the rape of Daisy Coleman, are presented as putting on their sunday best and playing to the crowd. They act like they're sorry, but they clearly are not. They play to the jury with fake tears and they decide that they have learned their lesson and their remorse is a good enough punishment.

    He refers to the result of all the attention that the case got and the subsequent "running out" of the victim's family from their own town. It also mentions her spirit which I will get into later, regarding the title of the song. Then, they get to the main overarching point which is: this kind of system works against women because it's under the illusion that choice is something that everyone is granted freely, fairly and consistently. This is not true. The whole idea of rape is that you are taking the choice away from the victim. It is EVERYONE'S responsibility to ensure that men, women and children are continually granted the freedoms that they have a right too. And the only way we can do that is by changing the way we behave and how we treat women as a society.

    Being born as a female into a body that you only own when others don't take it from you by force. It's intercut with lines like "lay back, sweetheart" which is something that might be said to one during rape. They also satirically ask the question, "What more could a lady ask for, then to be treated like a hole?" And the sad thing is, some men truly think this way.

    Jadea's bridge talks about how delicate freedom is, being lost during the worst kinds of catastrophes. And worse than any jail time, is how this poor girl's mind is locked up by these events.

    This last part with Rody lays it out clearly (and it's my favorite):
    It doesn't matter who this girl is, no one is innocent if the ones guilty go free.
    When we collectively raise these kinds of beasts through our own lack of proper instruction, then we have to take responsibility collectively for things like the rape of this child.

    The title of the song refers to Plato's theory of the soul tripartite.
    In his theory he has the three parts of the soul: Logical, Spirited and Appetitive.
    The logical should rule with support from the spirited and the appetitive should obey.

    A case like this clearly lays out what happens when the three parts are not in proper balance.
    In this case, the legal system is spirited, but not bound by the logical, or perhaps the logical is misguided. The spirited could even be helping the appetitive and it's love of money-making.
    The perpetrators clearly let their spirited soul give fuel to the flames of their appetitive and the result was the ruination of the victim.
    wolfblitzeron October 21, 2013   Link
  • +4
    General CommentMay I say that wolfblitzer as really caught the meaninng of it all, and it would seem theres' not many room to many others interpretations.

    Just a though, it feels like they have return to the sound of Kezia with a new and different style in there choice of melodies ( still alot of progressive riffs and PTH rythms), wich is great ! Really a great album !
    LoneJusticeon October 24, 2013   Link
  • 0
    Link(s)Great explanation of Rody on this interview about this song! killyourstereo.com/interviews/692/protest-the-hero/
    hideintheshallowson February 05, 2014   Link

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