"Unfit for Human Consumption" as written by Jeff Walker, Jeff Walker, William Geoffrey Steer and Daniel Wilding....
Seductive lymphandetitis
Delectable septic metritis
Tempting glanders jaundice
For human consumption unfit

Paltable melanosis
Aromatic mastitis
Saporous brucellosis
Cry havoc and let slip

Salivating
At the leash straining
The cadaver dogs
Devouring

Appetising
Diseased gastric dining
The cadaver dogs
In cold blood

Indulging in sarcocysts
Epicurean pericarditis
Cariosus tender and lean
After all you are what you eat

Salivating
At the leash straining
The cadaver dogs
Devouring

Appetising
Diseased gastric dining
The cadaver dogs
In cold blood

Unfit for human consumption
An appetite for bovine destruction
A manifesto for mutilation
Manifests in your own dereliction

The dogs of cruror released
On severed carnage feed
Cadaver dogs rapidly bay and seethe
Canine, ulunating, feverishly inhaling
the scent of human debris

Indulgent lymphandetitis
Aromatic mastitis
Corrosive carcase rotten and obscene
After all you are what you eat

Salivating
At the leash straining
The cadaver dogs
Devouring

Appetising
Diseased gastric dining
The cadaver dogs
In cold blood


Lyrics submitted by SongMeanings, edited by chestbuster

"Unfit for Human Consumption" as written by Jeff Walker Daniel Wilding

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Unfit for Human Consumption song meanings
Add your thoughts

2 Comments

sort form View by:
  • 0
    General CommentIn order to figure the song out look up the medical terms. It's carcass you're gonna need to be schooled in medical knowledge.
    Vikingberserkeron April 20, 2017   Link
  • -1
    Song MeaningThis song describes the practice of feeding cadavers to dogs, describing how the dogs start craving its taste.
    GhostRiderHon April 09, 2016   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain