The universe is permeated with the odor of kerosene

I was walking down the street at night,
Thinking in my mind that my life was right,
The moon came up and I looked around,
The street lights were on nowhere around.
My eyes were dark and my heart beat fast,
I knew that my dark side could not last

My eyes were dark and my heart beat fast,
I knew that my dark side could not last

It was dark as it could be,
A deep sea diver could not see,
Cars were driving with high beam,
You couldn't even tell if Mr. Clean was clean.

I lit a match and I walked on home,
My night side dark time cold and alone,
Walked in my door and to my surprise,
I had sunglasses on my eyes



Lyrics submitted by joelm

Blackout of Gretely song meanings
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  • 0
    General CommentThis song works on so many levels. The opening crashing E power chord, Craig Moore calmly invoking "the universe is permeated with the order of kerosene," the screamed vocals, the infectious guitar riff, the creepy-crawly sound of the cheap organ, the humorous twist at the end when the reason for the "blackout" is revealed. It all spells the best of mid-'60s garage rock, raw and unpolished but tuneful and well-played nonetheless, touching on protopunk, Stones-ish "Satisfaction"-style social commentary, Yardbirds/Count Five-style instrumental rave-ups, early psychedelia, and the tongue-in-cheek humor of perpetual rock jokesters like Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet). There is no song from the '60s quite like it, much as it invokes or touches on all these influences and contemporaries. These five unjustly-obscure guys from the rural southeastern corner of Iowa were the equals of Lou Reed or any other nonconformist finding his voice in that wondrous and lost era.
    mbrachmanon October 19, 2015   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song works on so many levels. The opening crashing E power chord, Craig Moore calmly invoking "the universe is permeated with the order of kerosene," the screamed vocals, the infectious guitar riff, the creepy-crawly sound of the cheap organ, the humorous twist at the end when the reason for the "blackout" is revealed. It all spells the best of mid-'60s garage rock, raw and unpolished but tuneful and well-played nonetheless, touching on protopunk, Stones-ish "Satisfaction"-style social commentary, Yardbirds/Count Five-style instrumental rave-ups, early psychedelia, and the tongue-in-cheek humor of perpetual rock jokesters like Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet). There is no song from the '60s quite like it, much as it invokes or touches on all these influences and contemporaries. These five unjustly-obscure guys from the rural southeastern corner of Iowa were the equals of Lou Reed or any other nonconformist finding his voice in that wondrous and lost era.
    mbrachmanon October 19, 2015   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song works on so many levels. The opening crashing E power chord, Craig Moore calmly invoking "the universe is permeated with the order of kerosene," the screamed vocals, the infectious guitar riff, the creepy-crawly sound of the cheap organ, the humorous twist at the end when the reason for the "blackout" is revealed. It all spells the best of mid-'60s garage rock, raw and unpolished but tuneful and well-played nonetheless, touching on protopunk, Stones-ish "Satisfaction"-style social commentary, Yardbirds/Count Five-style instrumental rave-ups, early psychedelia, and the tongue-in-cheek humor of perpetual rock jokesters like Frank Zappa and Captain Beefheart (Don Van Vliet). There is no song from the '60s quite like it, much as it invokes or touches on all these influences and contemporaries. These five unjustly-obscure guys from the rural southeastern corner of Iowa were the equals of Lou Reed or any other nonconformist finding his voice in that wondrous and lost era.
    mbrachmanon October 19, 2015   Link

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