An end so cold
For love which disappoints the heart, so cold
As flowers she tight holds

This is her end
No one can mend
What death calls for to the cold waters

This is her end
No life to spend
Only an end so cold

Nettles for harming
And orchids for charming
Poppies for doom
And violets for gloom

An end so cold
With flowers which reminds her pain, so cold
As love in days of old

The end's coming fast
As water runs past
Flowers compose a scene so pleasing

Is up the past
Peaceful at last
Only an end so cold

Nettles for harming
And orchids for charming
Poppies for doom
And violets for gloom
Daisies for cleanness
And pansies for meanness
For death and sorrow
One forget-me-not

"Too much of water hast thou, poor Ophelia"

Nettles for harming
And orchids for charming
Poppies for doom
And violets for gloom
Daisies for cleanness
And pansies for meanness
For death and sorrow
One forget-me-not

Nettles for harming
And orchids for charming
Poppies for doom
And violets for gloom
Daisies for cleanness
And pansies for meanness
For death and sorrow
One forget-me-not


Lyrics submitted by goldenchocolate, edited by MaidOMetal

An End So Cold song meanings
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  • +1
    Song MeaningThis song is about the character Ophelia from Shakespeare's "Hamlet".

    Ophelia was a noble woman who was in love with prince Hamlet. However her father commanded her to spurn her love and any advances from Hamlet.

    After Hamlet rebuffs her during a fit of despair (in large caused by her instructed rejection of Hamlet as a love interest), and her father's murder, Ophelia descends into madness and is eventually found drowned in a nearby pond. Whether or not it was an accident or a suicide has long been a literary debate.

    The lyrics in this song refer specifically to the scene (Act 4, Scene 5) where we see that Ophelia has gone off the deep end (pun intended). During the scene, Ophelia sings in riddles and gives other characters flowers, while describing the meaning of each.

    I don't think all of the flower sin the song actually appear int he play, nor are the meanings matched up.

    Here are Ophelia's lines:

    "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance; pray,
    love, remember: and there is pansies. that's for thoughts."

    "There's fennel for you, and columbines: there's rue
    for you; and here's some for me: we may call it
    herb-grace o' Sundays: O you must wear your rue with
    a difference. There's a daisy: I would give you
    some violets, but they withered all when my father
    died: they say he made a good end,--"
    MaidOMetalon June 21, 2013   Link

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