"How Does The Grass Grow?" as written by Jerry Lordan and David Bowie....
There’s a graveyard by the station
Where the girls wear nylon skirts and
Sandals ?
The boys ride their Riga 1’s
Upon the little hill
Such sadness and grief
The trees die standing
That’s where we made our trysts
And struggled with our guns
Would you still love me
If the clocks could go backwards
The girls would fill with blood and
The grass would be green again
Remember the dead
They were so great
Some of them

How does the grass grow
Blood blood blood
Where do the boys lie
Mud mud mud
How does the grass grow
Blood blood blood

But I lived a blind life
A white face in prison
But you made a life out of nothing
Now I ride my black horse
I miss you more
Than you’ll ever ever know
Waiting with my red eyes
And my stone heart

How does the grass grow
Blood blood blood
Where do the boys lie
Mud mud mud
How does the grass grow
Blood blood blood

I gaze in defeat
At the stars in the night
The light in my life burnt away
There will be no tomorrow
Then you sigh in your sleep
And meaning returns with the day

Where do the boys lie
Mud mud mud
How does the grass grow
Blood blood blood


Lyrics submitted by SongMeanings, edited by Allusi0, hornytheclown

"How Does the Grass Grow?" as written by Jerry Lordan David Bowie

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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How Does The Grass Grow? song meanings
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  • +1
    General CommentStill trying to figure out this cryptic song. Definitely about someone who was likely a soldier and forced to do some bloody, horrible things during his career. And it seems that experienced has warped him. Maybe some horrible sort of PTSD.

    He can't get his life together and feels isolated from the rest of society and lonely. He hates it, but can't escape the lessons he learned in the military (the chorus is a reiteration of these "lessons").

    The chorus also seems to be related to this scene from Full Metal Jacket: youtube.com/… (What makes the grass grow? Blood, blood, blood. What do we do for a living, ladies? Kill, kill, kill.
    hornytheclownon May 06, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"There’s a graveyard by the station
    Where the girls wear nylon skirts and
    Sandals from Hungary ..."
    Allusi0on April 08, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYes... but the entire first verse references scenes and conditions in post Soviet Russia (or the 'buffer states')... the Riga One was a late soviet (Latvian) moped, much beloved of teenagers from Russia to East Germany, also seen in Berlin in the late 70s....
    in more detail, it sounds post Soviet, from the satellite states which since floundered in civil wars... or maybe Jugoslavia, which was torn apart and 'joined the west'...
    the yayaya chorus is in fact a loose version of the 1960s pre-Beatles instrumental hit (for The Shadows) called 'Apache', which may reference another Empire, and the genocide which helped create it (it's also why the song gets a co-writer credit, even though that writer passed away in the 90s)
    a very sad song, a very beautiful song, maybe also having echoes of PJ Harvey's track Our Glorious Land from Let England Shake, which was the big offbeat hit while Bowie was recording this album.
    rustybucketon May 30, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYes... but the entire first verse references scenes and conditions in post Soviet Russia (or the 'buffer states')... the Riga One was a late soviet (Latvian) moped, much beloved of teenagers from Russia to East Germany, also seen in Berlin in the late 70s....
    in more detail, it sounds post Soviet, from the satellite states which since floundered in civil wars... or maybe Jugoslavia, which was torn apart and 'joined the west'...
    the yayaya chorus is in fact a loose version of the 1960s pre-Beatles instrumental hit (for The Shadows) called 'Apache', which may reference another Empire, and the genocide which helped create it (it's also why the song gets a co-writer credit, even though that writer passed away in the 90s)
    a very sad song, a very beautiful song, maybe also having echoes of PJ Harvey's track Our Glorious Land from Let England Shake, which was the big offbeat hit while Bowie was recording this album.
    rustybucketon May 30, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentYes... but the entire first verse references scenes and conditions in post Soviet Russia (or the 'buffer states')... the Riga One was a late soviet (Latvian) moped, much beloved of teenagers from Russia to East Germany, also seen in Berlin in the late 70s....
    in more detail, it sounds post Soviet, from the satellite states which since floundered in civil wars... or maybe Jugoslavia, which was torn apart and 'joined the west'...
    the yayaya chorus is in fact a loose version of the 1960s pre-Beatles instrumental hit (for The Shadows) called 'Apache', which may reference another Empire, and the genocide which helped create it (it's also why the song gets a co-writer credit, even though that writer passed away in the 90s)
    a very sad song, a very beautiful song, maybe also having echoes of PJ Harvey's track Our Glorious Land from Let England Shake, which was the big offbeat hit while Bowie was recording this album.
    rustybucketon May 30, 2014   Link

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