Back in double-o-seven
Miss M was queen
She could roll like a pro rolls
When she was seventeen

Whether straight or hammered
She was the best in town
When she release the red ball
All the pins fall down

Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Miss Marlene
We’re still bowling
Every Saturday night
Saturday night

Your move to the lane, child
Played on my heartstrings
With the long skinny legs, child
And your hoop earrings

When the stakes are sky-high
That’s when you'd always shine
The ball would ride a moonbeam
Down the inside line

Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Miss Marlene
We’re still bowling
Every Saturday night
Saturday night

And then, one night
Something came apart
You were throwin' back hurricanes
And we knew someone
Had played with your heart

You ran into the dark street
At University Place
The cab came up so fast that
We saw your laughin' face

Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Miss Marlene
We’re still bowling
Every Saturday night

Sometimes on a league night
I catch her scent again
Her hand guiding my hand
We drop the seven-ten

Can’t you hear the balls rumble?
Can’t you hear the balls rumble
Miss Marlene
We’re still bowling
Every Saturday night
Saturday night
Every Saturday night (x4)


Lyrics submitted by SongMeanings, edited by DcnBlues

Miss Marlene song meanings
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    My InterpretationI love this song, but am very conflicted about it. I think it’s clear that the narrator thinks quite fondly of the young Miss Marlene. He likes her legs and her earrings, and appears to genuinely miss her after she goes. From there, things get so murky for me.
    What does it mean to “Roll like a pro”? What is the reference to the “red ball” she drops to make “all the pins fall down?” Apparently, it doesn’t matter if she’s “straight or hammered.”
    1. It’s a song about bowling. (Nah.) University Place in NY has a very upscale bowling alley. A pretty girl who bowls well, whom the narrator misses. bowlmor.com/union-square/
    2. It’s a metaphor for oral sex, i.e. the best blow jobs in the world were given to the narrator by a seventeen year old girl that he misses. She rolled like a pro. She was the best in town. The pins fall down. The red ball is her uvula. She hugs the inside line (sensitive part of the penis), when the stakes were sky high. Can’t you hear the balls rumble. After she goes, on a “league night” (how boring) her hand guides his hand as he catches her scent again and thinks about her.
    3. It’s a metaphor for drugs. Speedball and powerballing is the intravenous use of cocaine and heroin in the same syringe. (Please see John Belushi, Chris Farley, etc.etc.) “Rolling” is getting high, and she rolled like a pro. Red ball = heroin. The ball would ride a moonbeam down the inside line. (I.V. Drug use). Can’t you see hear the balls rumble? We’re still bowling every Saturday night.
    4. The Mystery. What happens to Miss Marlene? She’s drinking heavily due a broken heart. She runs into the street and a cab comes up fast. The narrator sees her laughing face. Is she struck by the cab and killed? “I catch her sent again…her hand guiding my hand”. Sounds ghostly. But, he also appears to be inviting her to return. Can’t you hear the balls rumble? We’re still bowling every Saturday night.
    DcnBlueson February 25, 2014   Link

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