"Window on the World" as written by and John Hiatt....
A broken promise i kept too long
A greasy shade and a curtain drawn
A broken glass and a heart gone wrong
That's my window on the world

A cup of coffee in a shaky hand
Wakin' up in a foreign land
Tryin' to act like i got somethin' planned
That's my window on the world

That's my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don't let mama cut those curfs
That's my window on the world

In broad daylight that circus tent pulled up stakes
I don't know where it went
A close dark room with a busted vent
That's my window on the world

I think about you when i'm countin' sheep
I think about you, then i can't sleep
I think that ocean is just so deep
That's my window on the world

That's my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That's my window on the world

Down on indiana avenue
Wes and jimmy, man they played the blues
I guess they were only passin' through
That's my window on the world

That's my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
Don't let mama cut those curfs
That's my window on the world

That's my window on the world
Could you stand a little closer, girl
The queen of Sheba meets the duke of earle
That's my window on the world


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"Window on the World" as written by John Hiatt

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Window on the World song meanings
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    My InterpretationIn 1870, more African Americans were calling Indiana Avenue home as the original Irish and German populations began moving outward following the Emancipation Proclamation. The population had risen to 974 residents, more than one-third of the city's total African-American population. As the population escalated, African American residents took root opening businesses on practically every corner. Bethel AME (African Methodist Episcopal) Church, the oldest African American congregation in Indianapolis, was organized in 1836. The first African American businesses appeared on the 500 Block of Indiana Avenue as early as 1865: Samuel G. Smother's grocery store; William Franklin's peddler shop and the city's first owned and operated African American newspaper, The Indianapolis Leader in 1879.[2]

    The avenue continued to culturally develop, in much the same way as the Harlem Renaissance. In fact, due to the nature of segregation and Jim Crow laws, several streets developed similarly including Beale Street in Memphis and 12th and Vine in Kansas City according to the book, Indiana Avenue: Black Entertainment Boulevard by C. Nickerson Bolden. Like Indiana Avenue, these streets were called Black Entertainment Bouelvards, or stops along the Chitlin' circuit because of the large concentration of black-oriented clubs, businesses and entertainment venues.

    Many prominent historical figures have their roots on Indiana Avenue: Madam C.J. Walker, jazz greats including Freddie Hubbard, Jimmy Coe, Noble Sissle, Erroll "Groundhog" Grandy and Wes Montgomery. Mary Ellen Cable was one of the most important African American educators in Indianapolis. Coupled with her great work as an educator, she organized and served as the first president of Indiana's NAACP chapter.[
    jrisottoon August 13, 2015   Link

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