"Surgeon" as written by and Anne Erin Clark....
I spent the summer on my back
Another attack
Stay in just to get along, get along, get along

Turn off the TV, wade in bed
A blue and a red
A little something to get along, get along, get along
Get along, get along, get along

Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open
Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open

Dressing, undressing for a wall
If mother calls
She knows well we don't get along, get along, get along

I tell the mailman, never you mind,
I'll sift through the piles
And for him to just get along, get along, get along
Get along, get along, get along

Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open
Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open

Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open
Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open

Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open
Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open

Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open
Best, finest surgeon
Come cut me open


Lyrics submitted by broke_rock_star77, edited by bannus, vinnystardust, Ghado, WritesToLive, Sk8oreo

"Surgeon" as written by Anne Erin Clark

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Surgeon song meanings
Add your thoughts

23 Comments

sort form View by:
  • +6
    General CommentThe line came from one of Marilyn Monroe. In an interview with NPR, Annie Clark said,

    "I was reading Marilyn Monroe's journals, she wrote down the sentence, 'Best, finest surgeon – Lee Strasberg, come cut me open,' because she was studying with Lee Strasberg at the Actor's Studio at the time, and he was a tremendous mentor to her. And I just thought that was brilliant and really strange. I definitely wanted this particular song to sound like someone was kind of in a Benzedrine and white-wine coma – like a housewife's cocktail."
    jennildon September 15, 2011   Link
  • +6
    General CommentShe is saying "best finest surgeon/come cut me open" It's definitely a Marilyn Monroe quote. I read that article in Vanity Fair too... fascinating.
    Eggos=yumon November 11, 2011   Link
  • +4
    General Commentdelicious st. vincent as usual. i love the double meaning of sex and surgery. "i spent the summer on my back" either having sex or on the table in a hospital. the song even starts and rises and climaxes like sex/surgery, with a slow start and a chaotic end.
    okaydoloreon July 23, 2011   Link
  • +2
    Lyric CorrectionWell, I hear the lyrics as:

    I spent the summer on my back
    Another attack
    Stayin' just to get along, get along, get along

    Turn off the TV
    Wait in bed
    Of blue and red
    A little something to get along, get along, get along
    Get along, get along, get along

    Best find a surgeon
    Come cut me open
    Best find a surgeon
    Come cut me open

    Dressing undressing for the wall
    If mother calls
    She knows where we don't get along, get along, get along

    I tell the mailman never you mind
    I'll sift through the piles
    And for him to just get along, get along, get along,
    Get along, get along, get along

    Best find a surgeon
    Come cut me open
    [repeats]
    ablationon August 19, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI spent the summer on my back
    Another attack
    Stealing just to get along

    and

    Best finest surgeon*
    Come cut me open

    ..or at least that's what I hear. Fantastic song. <3


    *that part I read in a blog. She got that from Marilyn Monroe's autobiography.
    fabulosityon July 29, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentSex, it's gotta be about sex. That's all I hear when when she sings, "best finest surgeon, come cut me open" I half expect her to wink after that line. Not to mention the obvious, "I spent the summer on my back".
    sonja22on August 02, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentWhile I definitely hear the references to sex, there's also the lines to consider that suggest the narrator doesn't have the best relationship with this other person. Even her mother knows their relationship is volatile. One of them is moving/moved out of where they once lived together, and she tells the mailman not to worry about delivering their mail to separate locations. (Maybe she wants to deliver personally because they still take opportunities for sex in spite of all this?) "Just get along" might mean that the affair has become lifeless and drawn out, which would explain why she compares the act of sex to a medical procedure.

    Anyways, fantastic song.
    broke_rock_star77on September 03, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI think this song is about depression. It kind of hit me one day listening to the lyrics closer.

    The get along part to me is kind of like just wanting to make it through the day. Not cause trouble, but not drown. Just get along.

    "Turn off the TV wait it bed" possibly just the idea of how a lot of time depressed people don't do anything but hang around in bed all day. Like the "I spent the summer on my back" line. In other words I did nothing all summer but be depressed. Blue and red I think also have some depressive meanings. Blue is kind of obvious, and then red is like the anger and frustration of it all.

    "Dressing, undressing for a wall" is feeling like you're not getting ready or participating in your life for yourself. You're not doing it for anyone, you might as well be doing it for the walls.

    And of course "Best, finest surgeon. Come cut me open." I feel like it's talking about the desperateness. The burning desire to feel better. Wishing there was just this surgery to get rid of the depression, but knowing it's not that sort of illness.

    I'm pretty sure there's even an interview where the interviewer says that they think the opening line must be sexual, and Annie replies with something along the lines of "or it's about being depressed." I really don't think the song is too sexual (and let's be honest, 'come cut me open' is a pretty weird euphemism for sex).
    SirBlackSheepon October 28, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General CommentAgree with SirBlackSheep, but I think that when she says "Dressing and undressing for a wall", she refers of loneliness.

    This song is about feeling depressed and lonely: I tell the mailman, "Never you mind,
    I'll sift through the piles" talks about wanting to be alone.
    The part of the mother: Obviously our mothers care for us and keep bothering, asking questions,etc. She refers to that, and states she has issues with her mom: If mother calls, she knows well we don't get along"

    The chorus is basically she asking for help.
    pinipinon May 21, 2012   Link
  • +1
    General CommentIt is
    STAYING just to get along

    chorus:
    Best, FINEST surgeon etc.

    Annie Clark said it herself she got the chorus line from Marilyn Monroe's diary--somebody aint reading the comments! (I tried to find the "lyric correction" for type of comment but it doesn't appear)

    To me the "blue and red" stood for bruises, however not literally, but mentally being beat up and just tired. "A little something to get along" keeps her from giving up on her life, that perhaps she can use the depressed feelings she has to push through to a better life. Someone else wrote the blue and red line stood for "blue=sad red=anger" but all in all I think we've got the same meaning :)
    tittysauceon January 07, 2013   Link

Add your thoughts

Log in now to tell us what you think this song means.

Don’t have an account? Create an account with SongMeanings to post comments, submit lyrics, and more. It’s super easy, we promise!

Back to top
explain