Get me off whatever you're on
I'm just trying to be yourself
self's aware but barely
fight for my two cents
and commit to my dreams existence
I'll only ever know myself

Carry this on to the ones that lost their way
I'm right beside you
every time you need a hand there i'll be
I'm right beside you now

Un-notice me
you're observation is deadly
defiling all that is in me
You tried to choke out my process
but ended up taking damage

The cycle never ends
you're kicking and screaming my name
spinning into oblivion
breathe in your hot air
for some reason its not uplifting
its dense just like your point of view

You gotta get me off whatever you're on

Let me go, away
I know that you won't stay

Please forgive me
I didn't know
I've got my finger on the pulse
You said goodbye, so-long
I'll see you when it's over

I know what you are thinking
how could he take apart my safety

We're not the ones keeping you down




Lyrics submitted by symbolica

Faust song meanings
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  • +3
    My InterpretationI have read the original 'Faust, a Tragedy' by Goethe, and can see a clear link between the story and the song.

    "Get me off whatever you're on
    I'm just trying to be yourself
    self's aware but barely
    fight for my two cents
    and commit to my dreams existence
    I'll only ever know myself"
    This is an illustration of the beginning of the piece, where Faust, in the twilight years of his life, constantly strives still for yet more information and enlightenment, despite mastery of all but the most esoteric of fields. He is dissatisfied with life and what he knows, and he rationalises that can only humanely know so much as himself, turning to suicide. He is interrupted by the sounds of the church's Easter celebration and carries on for a few more days.

    "Carry this on to the ones that lost their way
    I'm right beside you
    every time you need a hand there I'll be
    I'm right beside you now"
    Faust meets Mephistopheles, a devil or evil spirit, whom he makes a pact with, essentially 'selling his soul' to him. The terms of the agreement: Mephistopheles is to serve Faust's every whim in his mortal life, so long as he serves Mephistopheles in the next. This verse is delivered by Mephistopheles, supposedly on agreeing to the terms of the pact.

    "Un-notice me
    your observation is deadly
    defiling all that is in me
    You tried to choke out my process
    but ended up taking damage"
    Faust is indulged in his greatest desires, however realises slowly that Mephistopheles' influence is toxic, immoral, unethical; particularly when Mephistopheles deceives him as his young lover Gretchen is imprisoned and abandoned. He ironically blames Mephistopheles, though he set everything into motion, showing us as the audience his self-security and righteousness to a degree.

    "The cycle never ends
    you're kicking and screaming my name
    spinning into oblivion
    breathe in your hot air
    for some reason its not uplifting
    its dense just like your point of view"
    This is Mephistopheles retaliating, or rather, making remarks to Faust as he descends into immorality, sin and his own undoing; 'oblivion'. The end three lines of this verse to me describe the way in which Faust tries to comfort himself and reconcile with his once 'divine' knowledge and wisdom, but is no longer satisfied by his 'dense... point of view'.

    "You gotta get me off whatever you're on "
    Originally despising his thirst for knowledge and ultimate ennui, Faust sees that the fate Mephistopheles has brought about is just as bad, if not worse.

    "Let me go, away
    I know that you won't stay"
    My first impression was that this was addressed to Mephistopheles - Faust sees that his life is no better than before, and that the enjoyment and splendour are only fleeting; it 'won't stay'. However, I too thought that this might be delivered by Gretchen, who, though loving Faust, (having killed her mother and young son) accepts her fate and turns back to God ('let me go away') and righteousness. Faust in this interpretation indeed 'won't stay' as he returns to the devil that Gretchen loathes, abandoning her once again.

    "Please forgive me
    I didn't know
    I've got my finger on the pulse
    You said goodbye, so-long
    I'll see you when it's over"
    Probably my favourite verse, and definitely one of the most emotional. Either Faust's response to Gretchen, as he regretfully leaves her to her own death, or perhaps his pleas with God when he realises that he has gone too far and is condemned.

    "I know what you are thinking
    how could he take apart my safety"
    To Gretchen, to God, to the audience or even himself, Faust wonders how he, such a bright and wise man, was so quickly corrupted and brought down by Mephistopheles.

    "We're not the ones keeping you down"
    I think this refers to Mephistopheles' point of view, expressed in the prelude of the piece, that Faust was already inevitably damned, and that Mephistopheles only allowed him to fully realise this and harvest his soul.

    This is definitely one of the Human Abstract's best songs. The atmosphere is just amazing, and all the different elements combine so perfectly. Not much more I can say, really.
    I recommend the original work, too, if you're willing.
    Thallon February 20, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSince nobody has started a conversation about this song, I just wanted to start by saying that I didn't know what "Faust" was about, so I googled it and this is from wikipedia:

    "Faust or Faustus (Latin for "auspicious" or "lucky") is the protagonist of a classic German legend. Though a highly successful scholar, he is dissatisfied, and makes a deal with the devil, exchanging his soul for unlimited knowledge and worldly pleasures. Faust's tale is the basis for many literary, artistic, cinematic, and musical works. The meaning of the word and name has been reinterpreted through the ages. Faust, and the adjective Faustian, are often used to describe an arrangement in which an ambitious person surrenders moral integrity in order to achieve power and success: the proverbial "deal with the devil". The terms can also refer to an unquenchable thirst for knowledge"
    hideintheshallowson March 12, 2011   Link

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