"Cameo" as written by Mark Allen Mothersbaugh and Gerald V. Casale....
He said his name was Cameo Cameo
He said his name was Cameo Cameo

He said his name was Cameo
He danced a nasty funk-style retro
He drove a bright red '67 GTO
He liked to let his Elvis-style hair grow

He was a black belt loaded with skills
He spoke slow choosing words that could kill
Honest people didn't need to fear him
But do not cross that Native American

Cameo Cameo
Cameo Cameo
He said his name was Cameo Cameo
He said his name was Cameo Cameo

He'd whisper "White Man speak with forked tongue"
Before he's finished talking, you'd be goin' down
He'd repeat "White Man speak with forked tongue"
By then, you'd be dead and buried in the ground

Cameo Cameo
Cameo Cameo
I said his name was Cameo
He said his name was Cameo

He wore a white leather racing jacket
Zipped wide open so you could check out
His tanned body and his clean-shaved pecs
And the turquoise jewelry dangling from his neck

Whoo! Whoo! Whoo!
Un huh un huh
He said his name was Cameo
He said his name was Cameo
Cameo Cameo
Cameo Cameo


Lyrics submitted by uteinfullerton

"Cameo" as written by Mark Allen Mothersbaugh Gerald V. Casale

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

Lyrics powered by LyricFind

Cameo song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • 0
    My InterpretationThis song is one of those ballads about a particular person. This one is about a Native American named Cameo. Or is it deeper than that? A cameo Can be a celebrity that plays a bit part in a work of media. perhaps this song is trying to represent all cameos collectively.
    travisbron August 21, 2016   Link
  • 0
    General CommentNative Americans in the general American (white) consciousness basically are a celebrated cameo in the story of US. We love to ignore that they are still here. It's wrong and sad. This song either mocks racism or is racist.
    margaretshon February 19, 2017   Link

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