"Schoolin" as written by Jonathan Joseph Higgs, Jeremy Joseph Pritchard, Alexander Kaines Robertshaw and Michael David Spearman....
Brother you look like the Taj Mahal
One colossal dome above you
And the smell of something other,
A pillar and a scimitar
A little

Yes I miss you like a formless hide
Stretching over me and dangled
From the coastguard in a chopper
The scaffold of me all awry
A little

Broke your shoulder on the library steps
Hanging round there in the dark
Just doing nothing or whatever
What do you mean you saw the stars?
You little

I could write it in a murder font
I could say it in a way that would be lying or whatever
I don't want them to tell us apart!

You say that I'm an overlord?
I've got myself a fire hydrant, with more tyrant,
In watery blasts, than all of my past!
You seen me on the bridge a lot.
But I never leapt over, the pent upper
My number is up, my number is up
But infinite and joyless little high fives
Are singing "praise the lord"
And "pitter patter this schooling?
Is this schooling?"
And "you matter not, and you matter not"
And is it, the flogging of the Flintstone
That I'm supposed to be?
The cerebellum get schoolin', and no schoolin'
The drummer goes on, the drama goes on

(Teach me how to hold)

And I don't wanna make a scene
I don't wanna think about the 3rd world hunger or whatever
Cos thinking always comes across
A little

There's a meeting of the worlds tonight
Right above my head a miracle the sun erupt forever
I barely ever raise my eyes
A little

(Teach him how to hold!)

And oh I wanna make the peace
And god I gotta be on the train
Past the ruins the wall and the druids oh please

I'm whining like a braking bus
Maybe I can sit here and do nothing clever with a laser
I'm not about to open up!

You say that I'm an overlord?
I've got myself a fire hydrant, with more tyrant,
In watery blasts, than all of my past!
You seen me on the bridge a lot.
But I never leapt over, the pent upper
My number is up, my number is up
But infinite and joyless little high fives are singing "praise the lord"
And "pitter patter this schooling? Is this schooling?"
And "you matter not, and you matter not"
And is it, the flogging of the Flintstone
That I'm supposed to be?
The cerebellum get schoolin', and no schoolin'
The drummer goes on, the drama goes on

The drummer goes on, the drama goes on
My number is up, my number is up

Earth, I take a long time, to learn about the big one
Gorilla limb swipe and beat, and I learn nil about
Earth.
Remember how men, would understand the heavens
But leaving those streetlights on you can't see nothing there

So learn me anything good

Teach me something that works, I take a long time,
To learn about the big one
Gorilla limb swipe and beat, and I learn dick about Earth.
Remember good men, would understand the heavens
And leaving those streetlights on a ghost dark hemisphere Earth.
I take a long time, to learn about the big one
Gorilla limb swipe and beat, and I learn dick about Earth.
Remember good man, you understand the heavens
But leaving those streetlights on?


Lyrics submitted by SteveBlythe

"Schoolin'" as written by Jeremy Joseph Pritchard Alexander Kaines Robertshaw

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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Schoolin song meanings
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4 Comments

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  • +3
    My InterpretationI think it's about the general state of being a human in the modern age.

    Broadly, the song returns to 3 ideas:
    1. Man in relation to grander structures -- i.e., repeated references to the sky (colossal dome), stars, man's small streetlights vs. the stars -- I get a pessimism out of that or a sense that modern man is overwhelmed, kind of animal stupidity that still thinks itself beyond it all, doesn't want to think about himself as small and actually not knowing very much, e.g.:
    'Right above my head a miracle the sun erupt forever
    I barely ever raise my eyes'

    2. Modern man living in 'developed world' with feelings of conflict and denial over where humanity has come from and destructive past & present (e.g., reference to the Flintstones, 'I don't wanna think about the 3rd world hunger or whatever', 'I wanna make the peace / Maybe I can sit here and do nothing clever', 'Gorilla limb swipe and beat, and I learn dick about Earth')–the protagonist wants to push away thinking about bigger things, is in a turmoil trying to distance themselves, keeps getting drawn back to man vs. the rest of the world, and not being able to deal with it.

    3. Fallacy of forward progress of mankind & ultimately failing to find absolute meaning for man's existence. So, the cerebral undertaking of academia as a means of man understanding the world, the frustration of the modern age conflict with the two sides of man irreconcilable–man as an animal, and man as animal that has consciousness and is alone and cut away from the rest of what we observe around us & endlessly perplexed by that

    Overall, I think the "schoolin" aspect of the song and the allusions to learning makes sense best combined with the repeated references to the stars vs. man-made streetlamps. It's about the obvious contradictions in the notion of human development and progress. We think we know a lot, but all around us we're reminded that we're, a) small in comparison to what's outside us, and b) mammals with the capacity to be self-aware like no other creature we've come into contact with.

    Or to put it like Christopher Hitchens:
    'Evolution has meant that our prefrontal lobes are too small, our adrenal glands are too big…'

    The modern state of being is one which lands us in a state of conflict, denial and confusion, makes for a lot of mental turmoil and discomfort, because we're told (by the world that appeals to the mind, school, academia) one thing, but our existence and the reality of being the human animal in the modern age results in a lot of contradiction and torment for someone trying to come to terms with 'why are we here' and 'what is my purpose' type questions. I think this song and a lot of this band's output shares common ground with the ideas explored by Radiohead, OK Computer-type modern angst, but I feel Everything Everything's stuff has a playful note and free-association that prevents it from being tied down (despite me trying to do that here--there are whole verses that I get the feeling are there for 'mood', not to be penetrated really, and the style of the singer's delivery makes it pretty impenetrable just listening to it and so the words and meaning are swept away in the music or just a sound to accompany the music and create an overall effect that's really jumped up and technicolor)

    Other songs by this band I've heard that mesh with the meaning here would be: 'MY KZ, UR BF'--about a petty argument going on while a nuclear bomb drops
    'Torso of the Week'–a counties housewife obsessively maintains her body while her life has no meaning
    dianaoddon April 04, 2013   Link
  • +2
    My InterpretationI think it's written in the shoes of a rebellious pupil in a school, who questions the way he is taught at school. He thinks he isn't taught about the big issues, and the things that matter in the world like trying to protect the earth.
    He thinks academic subjects are supported a lot more than more arts subjects like "music" and "drama" ("The cerebellum get schoolin', and no schoolin' - the drummer goes on, the drama goes on) and he doesn't agree with this.
    "But infinite and joyless little high fives are singing "praise the lord" talks about religious subjects. "And is it, the flogging of the Flintstone - that I'm supposed to be?" I think this is about the past (history subjects). These are all critical statements, and I think the narrator thinks these subjects are taught and supported but he thinks other things aren't considered important in society, so the "drummer" can't get far in his favourite subject.
    There's loads here in just one song, not just one topic, and I couldn't sit here and talk about em all, but it's generally a range of critical views towards the way kids are taught at school.
    SoftMinton December 02, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe name of the song is a clue of what it's about.
    SoftMinton December 02, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is just incredibe, I love how every member of the band really puts in an exceptional performance.

    Lyrically I've never really been able to suss it out. Just like you can say with the sound, it just seems like a lot all in one song. Although I do notice that this song along with other songs on this album speak of having concern about the lack of concern people have about the world, looking at the worlds issues from a bigger picture. Problems like 3rd world hunger mentioned in this song, global warning (NASA is on your side) and war (My kz ur bf).
    PromiseGon August 22, 2014   Link

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