"Frankenstein" as written by and Wright Monks....
Catch your breath
Take your time
It's a goldmine
But that's my only crime
That's my only crime
I'm a sap
The sugarcane
And I have found a way to celebrate
But that's my only crime
Just gimme the keys and gimme your time

So tell me
It's good to be back
A gold star turns black
Tell me
It's good to be back
A gold star turns black

I see Paris
I see France
I see you making that face again
But that's my only crime
If you wanna make waves
So take your time
The nuclear wind would look these over mild
New and improved
He was late all the time
Oh, but that's my only crime

So tell me
It's good to be back
A gold star turns black
Tell me
It's good to be back
A gold star turns black

So tell me
You're coming with us
Ten outta ten
An A plus
So tell me
It's good to be back
Turns black
Turns black


Lyrics submitted by lxsdr, edited by P514sub

"Frankenstein" as written by Graham Fraser Wright David Thomas Monks

Lyrics © SONGS MUSIC PUBLISHING

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Frankenstein song meanings
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  • +2
    Song MeaningMy only question is why is the title "Frankenstein"?
    LazyFman202on June 20, 2010   Link
  • +2
    General CommentI take my time and sometimes it takes a while. I'm guilty for that.
    There's opportunity and chance and I take it. I'm guilty for that.
    Let me see you, spend time with me.

    Tell me you missed me.
    I've missed this.
    I think I've gotten colder.

    We get undressed and bare and I love that look on your face. I'm guilty for that.
    And we can have sex.
    Think it through and take your time.
    With your strong sudden urges, and I know it may take a while.
    You're coming to realizations, but sometimes it's too late. I'm guilty for that.

    Tell me you missed me.
    I've missed this.
    I think I've gotten colder.

    So tell me you're coming with me.
    Completely sure.
    And giving it everything you've got.
    Tell me you missed me.
    I'm cold.
    I'm cold.

    Frankenstein, so he can come back alive.
    He's saying I love you. I love you.
    duhrillon February 07, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General Commentcorrections:
    "I'm the south" instead of "I'm a sap"
    "the nuclear whim with the fuse of a mile"
    and "WHO is late all the time" instead of "he"
    Christa426on June 06, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthe whole album itself has regression feel towards the childhood.
    and i think frankenstein is a nickname for a kid who's a bad ass but often misunderstood. i think he's digging in his nose in the first verse. he might be referring to his genitals when he said "sugarcane"

    and gold star stickers are used to award good kids and maybe his stars turning black is his transformation from being a good kid to a "frankenstein"
    just a guess...
    pomlrag37on February 08, 2011   Link
  • 0
    Song MeaningSuper-long in-depth examination, so read at your own risk and feel free to make your own interpretations and alterations.

    Dr. Frankenstein, in the book by Mary Shelley, was a character who tampered with the rules that govern life and thus created a monster which despised its own existence. At the end of the book, both the monster and Dr. Frankenstein perish, because the creation of this monster was so against the natural order of things.

    This song is about a relationship.

    "catch your breath
    take your time
    it's a gold mine
    but that's my only crime
    that's my only crime
    I'm the south
    the sugarcane
    and I have found a way to celebrate
    but that's my only crime
    just gimme the keys and gimme your time"

    --For convenience purposes, we'll call the speaker a he, or a boyfriend, and the person to whom he speaks a she, his girlfriend. Maybe it could be the other way around, too. Who knows?--

    "Catch your breath/Take your time" is the speaker telling the (supposed)girlfriend that she can have her space. One can guess from the word choice of "catch your breath" that she feels that the relationship is going too fast.
    When he then calls her time a "gold mine," it means that he thinks that there's a lot in her time for him to have. There is obviously nothing sharing about this relationship- the gold mine is there for his taking.
    [It could also be a reference to the gold that's mentioned later in the song- the gold stars, her past rewards for being a good girl, stashed away in her own private cave? (The gold stars represent the positive reinforcement that good kids get in elementary schools- you'll see later.) By calling her time a "gold mine", the speaker is demeaning her accomplishments, as though the gold is not from her accomplishments but something innate and nonrenewable that's precious and running out. He wants to take that gold, and by taking it, he risks transforming her into an empty, black cave.]
    "But that's my only crime" is a phrase repeated throughout the song which continually morphs in its meaning. Here, he's on the defensive. The crime is in his thinking her time a gold mine, in wanting to take things a little fast. He calls himself the South, a place that's warm, where life thrives. The sugarcane is raw, unprocessed sugar. It's his primal instinct, and the sugar cane could perhaps be intended as a phallic symbol as well (not entirely certain about that).
    "Just gimme the keys and gimme your time"- with these words, he shows he's being controlling and manipulative. He wants the keys to her privacy too quickly, and he won't take no for an answer. He's giving her her time to think it over- but he wants what he wants.

    "so tell me
    it's good to be back
    a gold star turns black
    tell me
    it's good to be back
    a gold star turns black"

    "So tell me/It's good to be back"- he's urging her to tell him that she's not taking any more time to think about their relationship, and that she's ready to keep going with him.
    The gold-star-turning-black image is particularly intricate and could mean a few different things. The gold star (remember "Ten outta ten/An A plus") represents her always having been a good girl, in school and in everyday life. It's also a mark of immaturity- you really only get gold stars in elementary school. He uses the gold star image to poke fun at her being a good girl.
    Black star, though, he could use to mean a few different things. "Turning black," obviously, can mean that she's becoming a bad girl. This early in the song, though, it could be indicating the black dwarf star. The black dwarf is a cold, dead star, the only testament to the bright star that it used to be, burning in the depths of space. Here, the girlfriend is being unresponsive to his advances- a cold, dead star.

    "I see Paris
    I see France
    I see you making that face again
    but that's my only crime
    if you wanna make waves
    so take your time
    the nuclear whim with the fuse of a mile
    new and improved
    who is late all the time
    oh, but that's my only crime"

    "I see Paris/I see France" refers to the verses that everybody knows in kindergarten. The next line is "I see someone's underpants." It's the speaker again calling her immature and at the same time making hints at her. In reaction, she "makes a face" at him. Making faces is something little kids do, so this indicates that he doesn't take her disapproval seriously and thinks she has some growing up to do.
    "But that's my only crime/If you wanna make waves/So take your time." His crime now is related to her "making waves." He truly doesn't think he's done anything wrong. He's also psychologizing her, making her think that her complaints have no basis. She can take her time, but he makes her feel guilty for it.
    "The nuclear whim with the fuse of a mile." By "whim," he's saying that her objections are unpredictable and utterly arbitrary. With "nuclear," he indicates that she's a devastating bomb ready to blow the relationship apart, but her "long fuse" means that she will endure the relationship for a long time and probably never make good on her threats.
    "New and improved/Who is late all the time." She is "new and improved." The relationship has changed her, but she is "late all the time" because she hesitates to make these changes, not willing to give up her gold star status.
    This time he repeats "Oh, but that's my only crime" to minimize it, to make her think that these pushes he's giving her are really no big deal, perhaps that other boys do it too and that she can just deal with it.

    "so tell me
    you're coming with us
    ten outta ten
    an A plus
    so tell me
    it's good to be back
    turns black
    turns black"

    "You're coming with us" is a fitting variation of what he's been saying- "It's good to be back." When he says "us," that's himself and the girl having already moved forward in the relationship, and her finally coming with them is her will finally succumbing. His separating her into two pieces seems to say that her choices are not important to him. All that really matters is that he can still dominate her and use her as he likes, and if she's finally giving up, then good- he doesn't have to worry much about the "nuclear whim" anymore.
    "Ten outta ten/An A plus." Showing his approval, sure, but he's still mocking her for having been a good girl and is treating her like a child who is without any ability to make her own choices.
    A final note on the "turns black": the black star could also refer to a black hole. He's taking away her will, but it will soon take its toll on him too, like the monster did on Dr. Frankenstein. The underlying message is that one cannot create love where it does not exist naturally, just as one should not do it with life.
    DarkHorse113on May 26, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI've just read Frankenstein by Mary Shelly recently and it struck me hard when I got to the part where Frankenstein came back to his native town for the first time after six years faraway to study and especially the nightmare of creating a monster
    right at that part, without my knowing, the chorus
    " So tell me
    It's good to be back
    A gold star
    Turns black"
    banged in and got stuck in my mind and it makes sense.
    I'm not sure about other parts but I feel the chorus is very related to that part in Mary's book.

    There's a quote like this " Dear mountains! My own beautiful lake! How do you welcom your wanderer? Your summits are clear; the sky and lack are blue and placid. Is this to prognosticate peace or to mock at my unhappiness?"
    which I think refers much to these lyrics "So tell me it's good to be back" and "a gold star turns black" might be related to the failure in creation of Frankenstein.

    Anyway it's just my thought and I'm just so obsessed with both the book and this song that I really want to write this down : )

    Tokyo Police Club's lyrics always a pleasure to deep into <3
    fallinhon February 27, 2013   Link

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