"Blue Blood Blues" as written by Dean Anthony Fertita, Jack White and Jack Michael Lawrence....
Yeah, I love you so much.
I don't need to resist.
I don't need to exist.
Dripping blue blood from the wrist.
I don't need to resist.
And all the neighbors get pissed when I come home.
I make em nervous.
Yeah, I make em nervous.

Crack a window, crack a broken bone.
Crack your knuckles when you're at home.
Lick an ice cream cone. Crack a bone.

All you had to do was ask.
Who is it that wears the mask?
When you give me the task.
Leave me broke and shirtless.
Check your lips at the door woman.
Shake your hips like battleships.

Yeah, all the white girls trip when I sing at Sunday service.
Sing. Sing. Sing.

I only got one face da da da da.
I tried too long to erase.
You know if I left. da da da da.
I wouldn't leave a trace.

If I left you woman, you know, I wouldn't leave a trace.
I wouldn't leave a trace.
I wouldn't leave a trace.

If I left, you'd never see me again.
You'd never see me again.
I wouldn't leave a trace.

You'd never see me again.


Lyrics submitted by deepintheorchard

"Blue Blood Blues" as written by Jack White Jack Lawrence

Lyrics © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd.

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Blue Blood Blues song meanings
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  • +3
    My InterpretationReally surprised so few people have commented on this so far. I guess I’ll take a stab at it.

    This song is credited to Dean Fertita, Jack Lawrence, and Jack White. I suspect White is responsible for the lyrics–structurally and stylistically, they bear his stamp.

    I think this song is about the tension between love and the desire for freedom that crops up in any marriage or long-term relationship, especially a high-profile one with its particular pressures. It may even reflect White’s own struggles on that front, as suggested by the title. A “blue blood” is a somewhat disparaging term for a member of the British nobility, and White’s wife, interestingly enough, is British. Or it could have nothing to do with her, in which case White may have chosen the color “blue” simply because it’s the color of sadness.

    Here’s a line-by-line breakdown:


    Yeah, I love you so much,
    I don’t need to resist.
    I don’t need to exist,

    This speaks to the power of a love so overwhelming that the individual “I” is consumed in the “we” of the relationship.

    Dripping blue blood
    From my wrist.
    I don’t need to resist.

    But this kind of love has a dark side. Obliteration of the self in love is also a kind of death. If the “blue blood” of this song's title indeed refers to a person, notice how she’s so much a part of him that she’s become his own blood. They’re inseparable. Yet as she fills him up, she also obliterates him. That’s the tension between love and loss of self.

    Yeah, all the neighbors get pissed
    When I come home.
    I make ‘em nervous.
    (Come home (x 2).)
    Yeah, I make ‘em nervous.

    Why would the neighbors be disturbed when he comes home? Maybe because there’s trouble in the family...

    Crack a window, crack a broken bone.
    Crack your knuckles when you’re at home.
    Lick an ice cream cone.
    Crack a bone (x 3).
    (Crack a bone (x 3).)

    These lines are rather violent, hinting at bursts of temper that are physically and emotionally chipping away at the broken home, perhaps interspersed with attempts to “make nice” for the kids and whatnot (“lick an ice cream cone”). Alternatively, they paint a picture of someone sitting at home, waiting for the singer, perhaps cracking her knuckles and bingeing on ice cream out of boredom and anxiety.

    All you had to do was ask.
    Who is it that wears a mask?
    When you put me to task,
    You know, you leave me broke and shirtless.

    These lines are somewhat more ambiguous but seem to express the singer’s feeling that his loved one is insincere or manipulative (wearing a mask) and too demanding (taking the very shirt off his back).

    Check your lips
    At the door, woman.

    Ouch! Here he gets aggressive, bluntly telling her to shut up.

    Shake your hips
    Like battleships.

    Seems to be an acknowledgment of how women may use sex as a weapon in a relationship.

    And all the white girls trip
    When I sing at Sunday service,
    Sing at Sunday service (x 2),
    I sing at Sunday service.
    (Sing (x 3).)

    I agree with maxperkins, who thinks that “white girls” is actually a stand-in for Jack White fans. At this point, he seems to be reminding his partner that there are plenty of other women out there who appreciate him. The word “trip” here could either mean “fall,” implying that all the girls fall for him, or it could suggest a drug trip, meaning that the girls experience a kind of high when he performs “at Sunday service,” a nod to either White’s Catholic background or the nearly “religious” ecstasy that overwhelms his fans when he performs.

    I only got one face (dadadada)

    Seems to be another shot at the woman. Whereas she appears to “wear a mask,” he states that he’s always been himself...

    I tried too long to erase.

    ...even if he almost lost himself in her.

    You know if I left (dadadada),
    I wouldn’t leave a trace.
    I wouldn’t leave a trace (dadadada).
    I wouldn’t leave a trace.
    If I left you, woman,
    You know, I wouldn’t leave a trace.
    I wouldn’t leave a trace (x 5).
    If I left, you’d never see me again.
    You’d never see me again.
    I wouldn’t leave a trace.
    You’d never see me again.

    He concludes with a threat, reminding her that he could leave at any time, and if he does, he’ll be gone for good, completely.


    The overall effect of the song is very harsh, but I have to think it just reflects the darker thoughts that privately haunt many men through the ups and downs of a marriage or long-term relationship.
    LyricallyInclinedon March 01, 2011   Link
  • +1
    General Commentit's: "all the neighbors get pissed when i come home"
    niacitaon May 06, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentalso, i think it might be "check your lips at the door woman"
    niacitaon May 06, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwell you put me to task.
    drewzer15on May 17, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Shake your hips like battleships"

    This song is amazing! The bass line is delish. One of the best off Sea of Cowards, along with Gasoline and Die By The Drop
    FallLikeADominoon May 29, 2010   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationSeems like the song is a story about someone who's an adored icon, and is very sly.
    twwalteron July 03, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentokay so i'm in the thinking that this is one of the most meaningful songs the dead weather have come up with (and jack white in general). also like some dead weather songs (opposed to stripes and raconteurs i think it is autobiographical)
    so the first part is probably the most important and the most elusive.
    "i love you so much i don't need to resist, don't need to exist, dripping blue blood from my wrist", i'm guessing "don't need to exist" is about the occurrence of invisible music, and the "don't need to resist" might be the fact there is no fighting the current musical climate. and "bleeding blue blood from my wrist" is because Jack white's musical crusade (the return of tangible music and vinyl records) is a self inflicted one, that seems reasonably logical in context with much of the song.
    " all the neighbours get pissed when i come home, i make em nervous" seems pretty strait forward, others within the music industry are un-nerved and worried when jack is around.
    the next bit "crack a window, crack a broken bone" i took to be purely ryme with no reason, just a few throwaway lyrics.
    the next bit is the really important bit as it refers to the album name "sea of cowards" and the cover, with the masks.
    "all you had to do was ask, who is it that wears a mask" this is about cowardice on the internet, "masks" referring to avatars and false screen names (jack mentions this alot in interviews)
    I believe the next line is "when you put me to task, you leave me broke and shirtless" another thing about the internet, "put to task" is fans asking for new music "leave me broke and shirtless" is downloading it illegally.
    "check your lips at the door woman" i think is also about the on-line coward thing. think before you say your opinion, words are powerful. jack mentions this more than anything else when confronted with the internet.
    "shake your hips like battle ships" i think is another throwaway line to make the song seem more hip hop. just for atmosphere.
    "all the white girls trip when i sing at Sunday service" here i dont think "white girls" is literal, i think he means "white" as in his own surname. as in "Jack White fans". so "All the white girls trip when i sing at sunday service." sunday service is a real life experience comparable to seeing a live band.
    i think this bit means "all my fans still like to experience me sing live" its a bit of a stretch but i honestly think thats what it means. "people still appreciate tangible experiences"
    the next bit "i only got one face" is about him not lying online or to the media about himself. "i tryed to long to erase" i guess is about him trying to be only Jack White rather than John Gillis (his birth name), hes now only the musician.
    the last lines i still haven't figured out "if i left you woman i would't leave a trace" could be about him quitting the industry, if he left no one would here any news from him, but i don't really have a clue on this bit. well thats all my thoughts on this one.



    maxperkinson July 15, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI like maxperkins' thinking.

    I don't know what it's about. I've spent a long time trying to figure it out to no avail, but I was wondering whether 'blue blood' is a reference to those of a aristocratic background (blue blooded people) and that he's "dripping blue blood from his wrist" that even though he is seperated from ordinary people by his wealth and fame, he still feels and he lets that out through the songs.
    That kind of ties in with "when you give me the task you leave me broke and shirtless"- he's as vulnerable as anyone else, which is shown through the music.

    Maybe the part "check your lips at the door woman/ shake your hips like battleships" is about temptation to stray from what he's loyal to because the opportunity is always there because of who he is- either through people he knows or through fans or groupies, taking the idea that the White maybe should be capitalised, so it's "all the White girls trip when I sing at sunday service"- him being Jack White, singing, he had a religious upbringing but he does rock'n'roll, so girls like the fact he's the good boy gone bad, or vice versa.

    The part about having the face he tried to erase might be about the fact he tried hard to hide from the fame and notoriety in the early days, but he's embraced it knowing that he could live without it now if he wanted to. When he says "if I left you woman, you know" I'm thinking he was aiming it at somebody, don't know who, but just playing on his own words.
    VortexOfLanguageon February 05, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI'm pretty sure if you've ever heard an interview with Jack White, you would know he never writes "throwaway lyrics." We may never figure it out, but I am certain it has meaning to him :)
    heylover56on November 03, 2012   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAll the white girls TRIP when I, sing at Sunday service.

    Love that line. I don't know what it means though.
    ledzep426on April 08, 2014   Link

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