"Old Haunts" as written by and Brian Fallon....
A cherry bomb, you are a mystery
Exploded, sparkling quiet nights
My teenage heart packed all my misery, baby
To fingertips that might ignite
And all along you knew my story, didn't you
And all night long I carried yours
Your blood was mixed wine and robbery, baby
And left us always wanting more

So don't sing me your songs about the good times
Those days are gone and you should just let them go
And God help the man who says
If you'd have known me when
Old haunts are for forgotten ghosts
Old haunts are for forgotten ghosts

Cherry bomb, your love is surgery
Removing what you don't regard
And every breath felt like a funeral, baby
While you were packing up your car
And with the window down
I hear your tired mouth
You borrowed everything
And wore all your old welcomes out
And shame on you, my love
You sold your youth away
Memories are sinking ships
That never would be saved

So don't sing me your songs about the good times
Those days are gone and you should just let them go
And God help the man who says
If you'd have known me when
Old haunts are for forgotten ghosts
Old haunts are for forgotten ghosts

And shame, shame, shame, shame on you
You kept your mind and heart and youth
Just like a tomb
And shame, shame, shame, shame on you
You kept your mind and heart and youth
Just like a tomb

And don't sing me your songs about the good times
Those days are gone and you should just let them go
So God help the man who says
If you'd have known me when
Old haunts are for all those ghosts
And don't sing me your songs about the good times
Those days are gone and you should just let them go
And God help the man who says
If you'd have known me when
God help the man who says
If you'd have known me when
God help this man who says
My baby, if you'd have known me when
Old haunts are all we've ever known


Lyrics submitted by eltroyo11

"Old Haunts" as written by Brian Fallon

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Old Haunts song meanings
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11 Comments

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  • +3
    General Commenti think what brian is saying in this song is dont live in your past while you still have decades to live. by sitting around talking about old times your not out making new ones get out and live
    thehellionon May 18, 2010   Link
  • +2
    General CommentIn my opinion, this song is not only about Brian's reluctance to revisit the old haunts of his youth, but also the old haunts of the band and their music. He said that in this album he wanted to move away from The 59 Sound, and its style and this song illustrates this. For example, in 'The Navesink Banks' from their first album Sink or Swim, the guy in the song says "ah maria, if you woulda known me when..." and now Brian shows his reluctance to revisit the past musically, but to start something new, as in this song he says 'And God help the man who says, "If you'd have known me when..."
    Lance44on April 28, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentPersonally, I think it's about two people who were in a relationship (could be love, but could also be about friends) and who are obviously not the persons who they used to. They're holding on to things of the past, while it's clear that it's over. The whole song is about holding on to what has been, even though it makes you misserable. I think the point Brian's trying to make is that you, at some point, should let it go. Sometimes things are over and you should just accept it and not try to stay in the past.

    It's quite clear in these sentences: "And don't sing me your songs about the good times, those days are gone and you should just let them go." Don't keep on talking about the good days you've had, 'cause they're long gone. If it's over, it's over. Stop lying to yourself and let it go.
    guinness_on May 09, 2010   Link
  • +1
    Song MeaningI think this song is more complicated than just saying it's time to move on from older songs/relationships (depending on whether you think it's a love letter to an old girlfriend or to The '59 Sound) because of the last line.

    The entire song he is saying "god help THE man who says if youd'a known me when, old haunts are for forgotten ghosts" until the end when he says "god help THIS man, old haunts are all WE'VE ever known."

    He is succumbing to the reality that sometimes you can't move on. He is trying to convince someone (himself? I always thought it was a song talking to himself) that it's time to move on but by the end he knows that those old haunts aren't gone and neither is ready to leave them.
    asmith1912on June 13, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is a total guess, but some parts sound like a fight with a friend or someone who's become a bad person and just talks about the good times you used to have, instead of ever apoloizing for what they've done. "god help the man who says if you'd have known me when" seems like its somebody who realizes they're a bad person now and just tried to say how good they used to be instead of trying to fix who they are. but that doesn't really fit in with the illusion to navesink banks, so i'm not sure. it's just something i thought when i was listening to it.

    ps i kind of feel bad about listening to this before the cd comes out but of course i can't help myself :)
    eire46on April 30, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentby the way, i got the cd and the lyrics are "i hear you're tired now" not "i hear your tired mouth"
    eire46on June 13, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentand its "oh cherry bomb" and "all night long i'd carry yours" and "well shame on you my love"..just saying hahah
    eire46on June 13, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song exhibits Brian Fallon's strength as a writer so perfectly. On a CD whose statement was a departure from the copious (and much-appreciated) throwbacks of The '59 Sound, he writes a song which simultaneously denounces pointless nostalgia and references songs on both of their old albums. Old fans of the band will have no problem figuring out who "the man who says 'if you'da known me when'" is, before the final, brief but powerful admission that it is Fallon himself. Navesink Banks from Sink or Swim Covered, Fallon also references the opener of The '59 Sound with the "like a tomb" refrain, making the song a simultaneous denunciation of wistfulness and treat for those who respect their past efforts.
    SCross35on June 18, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentLove how he says 'God help the man who says if you'd have known me when'
    But if ya look back at Navesink banks from sink or swim, "saying "ah maria, if you woulda known me when...""... gotta love the wee connection
    Bensjaminon July 23, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commenti think that the knowing when shows the maturity hes gone through as a writer and his views. it has been quite some time since hes been writing and i imagine navesink was something he had written a longer time ago. just my thoughts though
    thehellionon September 18, 2010   Link

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