The madness and the damage done

(If) you write one more thing in my book of lies
I brainwash myself a blood-stained mind
Put on a glass, It'll never forget the pain
The same old, same old hurting game
You love the whole wide world with your body as a sign
But I never was the physical kind
You offer holy cure and sight to the blind
But I never was the miracle kind
You'll remember me when you sell your ring
Don't tell me you don't feel a thing
Holy Mary (I,) can't seem to shut her legs!
Thoughts run wild
The madness and the damage done

You'll remember me when your worlds collide
The sea will rise and your thought divide
You'll remember me when the sea retreats
The cerebral storm won another defeat*
While we sing to the moon your stars fall down
While our eyes run sore, you wear a crown
The sometimes, maybe: There's no middle ground
The void has won,
The madness and the damage done

The madness and the damage done


*FROM THE BOOKLET:
The cerebral storm won it's (/your) last (/another) defeat


Lyrics submitted by Unbelievable21

The Madness And The Damage Done (#1) song meanings
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  • 0
    General CommentI have... no fucking clue what to make of this song. O.O
    Bad relationships with a slutty person?
    Going insane with jealousy and letting madness take over? I have no clue XD
    Great song and great band though :D
    AkariKingon August 20, 2011   Link
  • 0
    My Interpretation"(If) you write one more thing in my book of lies
    I brainwash myself a blood-stained mind" -- I believe this refers to the Bible as a book of lies and emphasizes the victimization which results from relentless and pervasive indoctrination.

    "Put on a glass, It'll never forget the pain
    The same old, same old hurting game" -- I have to admit that I have no clue what the "put on a glass" line is referring to, but I think the rest of the stanza expresses a pretty obvious reference to asceticism. [By the way, track 8 of Shining's latest album, One One One, is called "The Hurting Game"]
    If the glass line refers to worldly transgressions (such as drinking or perhaps the glass of a telescope used to chart the stars -- an activity which was vehemently opposed by all religious authorities), then it would make sense for the ascetic to condemn him/herself to the "same old, same old hurting game." It could also be a commentary on the fact that the actual transgressions themselves will NEVER feel pain, yet the ascetic continues to endure pain and, in fact, welcomes suffering so that all of his/her attention may be properly focused on the realm outside the physical body and world.

    There are clear biblical overtones throughout this track (and countless other Shining songs). Most obviously, "You love the whole wide world with your body as a sign" -- referring to the Crucifixion; "But I never was the physical kind" -- referring to Transfiguration; "You offer holy cure and sight to the blind" -- referring to miracles performed by Jesus in the synoptic gospels.
    "You'll remember me when you sell your ring" -- This line is very interesting, partly because I do not believe it fits any particular biblical mold, and partly because I think that it makes sense to identify the ring from the lyric as the Ring of Gyges in Plato's famous argument regarding the inherently selfish nature of human beings. If this were the case, then the aim would seem to be something like: "remembering the mercy of God or the sayings/miracles of Jesus after the ring is no longer in your possession will help you focus on performing moral, rather than selfish, actions."
    That may be a bit of a stretch, but I do not believe that it is totally unwarranted either.
    "Holy Mary can't seem to shut her legs" -- HOLY MARY!
    This may refer to the "birth" of Gods or deities in any form, or the overwhelming devotion paid to Christian dogma. Either way, I think it is pretty clear that the "Immaculateness" of (the "Virgin") Mary the Mother of Jesus is being called into question -- I do not feel that the absurdity of the Immaculate Conception needs to be explained any further.
    "The sea will rise and your thought divide
    You'll remember me when the sea retreats
    The cerebral storm won another defeat" -- I am fairly certain that these lines reference the people of Israel's escape from slavery (Exodus), specifically when Moses is said to have parted the Red Sea to allow his people to cross safely before allowing the Sea to swallow the Egyptians in pursuit.

    "While we sing to the moon your stars fall down" -- I draw a blank on this one...I want to say that it has something to with the difference between humans as animals and humans as directors of our own experience (science, civilization, technology, etc.)

    "While our eyes run sore, you wear a crown" -- Again, I'm not sure there is a correct explanation for this line, but it could have something to do with the crevasse between the average citizen and the ruler of a nation, or the mortal (mankind) and the immortal (our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ), or the REAL and the IDEAL.

    "The sometimes, maybe: There's no middle ground
    The void has won" -- This may be a reference to Buddhist conceptions of the "Middle Way" and the all-encompassing "void" that is Brahman in Hindu philosophy.

    I think that most of the references contained in this song are self-explanatory, especially if you have any knowledge of Christian doctrine, but I do believe that there are also many ways to interpret the lyrics. Another very interesting thought to note is the connection between the overall attitude of these lyrics (as I understand the tone, downright condemning of Christianity/Catholicism) to Nietzsche's ideas on the genealogy of morals. In so many words, Nietzsche exposes the etymological origins of the terms "good" and "bad." The original meanings seem to have been predicated on maintaining an ordered division between the ruling Aristocracy and the plebeians. However, during the period of Jesus' ministry, Nietzsche argues, the Jews successfully inverted this order. This inversion resulted in the notion that the poor, low-born, and wretched were actually the wealthy, noble, and righteous in God's eyes, and vice versa. So, we find the terms "good" and "bad" denoting social rank and then being transformed into religiously-driven value judgments. Perhaps this song can be viewed as a commentary on the arguably inconsistent nature of theological arguments; in general, the tendency for such arguments to appeal to circular reasoning and faith-based certainty in order to "prove" dogmatic assertions which have been, are, and will be made regardless of the logical absurdities and contradictions following from the ridiculous premises which constitute so many arguments of this stripe.
    AquaDementiaon October 19, 2013   Link

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