Meet me in the garden where the weeds grow tall
Down by the gate
I got a secret that I might tell
It'll give me away

Ooh
Whatever you do
Ooh
Keep it with you

Meet me on the back porch where ivy climbs
Where they sat on the swing
Soak up the color of the midday sun
While the ocean sings

Ooh
Whatever you do
Ooh
Keep it with you

You and I
Well we're just pressing flowers
They die
But they're ours

Meet me in a poem of an iron bed
Wipe the dust away
Meet me in the tin tabs (?) from long ago
Trace the lines of my face

Ooh
Whatever you do
Ooh
Keep it with you

Keep it with you


Lyrics submitted by omgben

Pressing Flowers song meanings
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7 Comments

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  • +2
    My InterpretationI'm going to attempt to show you guys what I'VE interpreted this song to mean - take it however you'd like.

    The whole song, he's a bit vague about himself - who he is, where he is, what he has to say. The first line: "Meet me in the garden where the weeds grow tall, down by the gate" - he's telling her to meet him in an old, overgrown garden, evidently one that no one tends to anymore (and therefore where people used to live - people who are no longer there). Next, he says: "I got a secret that I might tell; it'll give me away" - he tells her that if she DOES go to the old garden, she might learn something about him - take note that technically, he still hasn't mentioned that he'll actually BE there, but has instead implying that through her journey to the garden, she may figure out a secret about this mysterious man.

    The chorus is pretty simple: "Ooh, whatever you do, ooh, keep it with you" - He's telling her that if she learns this secret, she must always remember it and keep it close to her.

    Now, for the next verse: "Meet me on the back porch where ivy climbs, where they sat on the swing" - note that he says SAT: past-tense. This implies that whoever used to live in this old house, with its ivy-ridden porch swing and unkempt garden, no longer is there. This is also an important factor in my conclusion (along with the fact that he hasn't mentioned actually BEING there - he's just telling her to go to those places). The next line: "Soak up the color of the midday sun, while the ocean sings" - this is basically just a poetic use of imagery - telling her to hear the sounds of things around her, soaking in the warmth of the sun and the sound of waves crashing - and he's telling her to feel these senses because they were the same things that the people who one sat on the old porch swing had felt so long ago.

    The next change in lyrics is the bridge: "You and I, well, we're just pressing flowers. They die, but they're ours" - he tells her that they're both the same, living out their lives (he uses "pressing flowers" to refer to this) as any normal person does. But then, he twists this around by telling her that these flowers (lives) eventually wither and die - but they're theirs (basically, what he's saying here is that lives eventually wither and fade - and wither she likes it or not, hers is one of them).

    The lyrics for this last verse are actually (I am 100% positive about this):

    "Meet me in a poem of an iron bed
    Wipe the dust away
    Meet me in the tintypes from long ago
    Trace the lines of my face"

    A tintype is a photograph taken as a positive on a thin tin plate. So, basically, he's asking her to remember him as he was long ago, when the tintypes (very old types of photographs) were taken. This whole verse is basically a metaphor: "Meet in a poem of an iron bed, wipe the dust away" - he's telling her to go to the bed, inside that old house, that used to be his, but hasn't been used in so long that it's covered in dust. Next, "Meet me in the tintypes from long ago, trace the lines of my face" - he's telling her to look at the very old photographs with him in them, tracing the lines of his face, remembering (this is key).

    My conclusion is simple: He's dead. The man singing this is not living. this is basically a message from a soul that has died YEARS ago (hence the old, withering house, old versions of photographs, and references to dying/death in the bridge). He's telling her - even though she may or may not be hearing this song - to go to the old, abandoned house that he had lived in years ago and remember him: remember how he used to sit on the porch swing (with either her - which would imply that she is very old and widowed by him - or anther woman - which would imply that both the man AND the other woman have died, and the identity of the girl the song is written to is unknown, although by the poetic descriptions of certain things, the girl the song is written for may be his daughter - a little girl who would notice things such as the weeds growing tall and towering over her, and being able to close her eyes and feel the senses that the man and his wife had felt all those years ago. "She" could also be some random girl who just so happened to stumble upon the old house, which would make sense, too), remember how his garden used to be neat and tended to, remember the bed he used to sleep in and the tintypes that he's in. The "secret" that he mentions in the beginning? It's either the fact that he's dead (if she didn't already know - implying that she's just that random girl who stumbled upon this old house), and he's trying to show that if this lost girl goes to the garden, the porch swing, the bedroom with the tintypes, she may be able to piece together that the inhabitants of the old house are long gone; OR we never learn the secret (implying that this is written to the man's wife or his daughter, and it's a secret that only someone that close to him could discover).

    I personally like the idea of this song being written to a random girl, better - it seems more mysterious, is in favor of some of my favorite possible interpretations, and maybe, just MAYBE, this song isn't written to some random person at all - it's written to you. The whole song, he's giving you instructions on what to do to find out the secret (that he's dead), which is why he's telling you to visit all those places in the house.

    So yeah, that was my interpretation of this song. Again, take it however you want, but it seems pretty accurate to me.
    tigers1535on May 16, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"You and I, we're just pressing flowers
    They're dying
    But they're ours"

    I think it's:
    "Meet me in pretend times from long ago.."
    I could be wrong..
    jesusfreak04on September 18, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo press a flower is to make a memory, to commemorate a special moment. When he says "You and I, we're just pressing flowers" I think he's saying we're making memories. In the next part ("they're dying, but they're ours") I think he's saying that he knows their time won't last, and they have to go their separate ways.

    Perhaps this is a couple who was together previously, and is coming back "meeting in the garden" to have one last moment together, but they know they cannot be together. Maybe they're with other people.

    Such a hauntingly beautiful song! The Civil Wars always manage to trigger memories for me, and bring me joy and pain in equal measure.
    musicangel86on December 11, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo press a flower is to make a memory, to commemorate a special moment. When he says "You and I, we're just pressing flowers" I think he's saying we're making memories. In the next part ("they're dying, but they're ours") I think he's saying that he knows their time won't last, and they have to go their separate ways.

    Perhaps this is a couple who was together previously, and is coming back "meeting in the garden" to have one last moment together, but they know they cannot be together. Maybe they're with other people.

    Such a hauntingly beautiful song! The Civil Wars always manage to trigger memories for me, and bring me joy and pain in equal measure.
    musicangel86on December 11, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo press a flower is to make a memory, to commemorate a special moment. When he says "You and I, we're just pressing flowers" I think he's saying we're making memories. In the next part ("they're dying, but they're ours") I think he's saying that he knows their time won't last, and they have to go their separate ways.

    Perhaps this is a couple who was together previously, and is coming back "meeting in the garden" to have one last moment together, but they know they cannot be together. Maybe they're with other people.

    Such a hauntingly beautiful song! The Civil Wars always manage to trigger memories for me, and bring me joy and pain in equal measure.
    musicangel86on December 11, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo press a flower is to make a memory, to commemorate a special moment. When he says "You and I, we're just pressing flowers" I think he's saying we're making memories. In the next part ("they're dying, but they're ours") I think he's saying that he knows their time won't last, and they have to go their separate ways.

    Perhaps this is a couple who was together previously, and is coming back "meeting in the garden" to have one last moment together, but they know they cannot be together. Maybe they're with other people.

    Such a hauntingly beautiful song! The Civil Wars always manage to trigger memories for me, and bring me joy and pain in equal measure.
    musicangel86on December 11, 2014   Link
  • 0
    General CommentTo press a flower is to make a memory, to commemorate a special moment. When he says "You and I, we're just pressing flowers" I think he's saying we're making memories. In the next part ("they're dying, but they're ours") I think he's saying that he knows their time won't last, and they have to go their separate ways.

    Perhaps this is a couple who was together previously, and is coming back "meeting in the garden" to have one last moment together, but they know they cannot be together. Maybe they're with other people.

    Such a hauntingly beautiful song! The Civil Wars always manage to trigger memories for me, and bring me joy and pain in equal measure.
    musicangel86on December 11, 2014   Link

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