"Omnos" as written by and Christian/stifter Glanzmann....
Immi daga uimpi geneta,
Lana beððos et' iouintutos
Blatus ceti, cantla carami
Aia gnata uimpi iouinca,
Pid in cete tu toue suoine,
Pid uregisi peli doniobi?
Aia gnata uimpi iouinca,
Pid in cete tu toue suoine

Aia mape coime, adrete!
In blatugabagli uorete,
Cante snon celiIui in cete!

Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti
Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti
Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti

N'immi mapos, immi drucocu
In cetobi selgin agumi,
Selgin blatos tou' iouintutos
Nu, uoregon, cu, uorigamos,
Lamman, cu, suuercin lingamos,
Indui uelui cantla canamos!
N'immi mapos, immi drucocu
In cetobi selgin agumi,

Ne moi iantus gnaton uorega,
Iantus drucocunos uoregon,
Cante toi in medie cete

Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti
Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti
Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti

Cu allate, papon sod urege,
EððiIo de iantu in cridie
VediIumi, cante moi uosta!

Ne, a gnata, cante t' usstami,
Ne uostami, ne te carami
Ne carami, nec carasumi

Boua daga uimpi geneta
Immi trouga, lana nariIas

Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti
Vrit, me lindos dubnon, piseti


Lyrics submitted by xxwildfangxx

"Omnos" as written by David Stifter Christian Glanzmann

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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Omnos song meanings
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5 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentAnna:

    Immi daga uimpi geneta,
    I am a fair, pretty girl,

    lana beððos et’ iouintutos.
    full of virtue and youthfulness.

    Blatus ceti, cantla carami.
    The forest's flowers and songs I love.

    Aia gnata uimpi iouinca,
    Hey, pretty young girl

    pid in cete tu toue suoine,
    what are you doing in the forest alone,

    pid uregisi peli doniobi?
    so far from all beings?

    Aia gnata uimpi iouinca,
    Hey, pretty young girl

    pid in cete tu toue suoine,
    what are you doing in the forest alone

    Aia mape coime, adrete!
    Hey, handsome boy, come here!

    In blatugabagli uorete,
    Let us pick some flowers

    cante snon celiIui in cete!
    in this forest together!

    Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti. (x2)
    Now only the deep pond awaits me. (x2)

    N’immi mapos, immi drucocu.
    I am not a boy, I am the bad wolf.

    In cetobi selgin agumi,
    In the woods I hunt,

    selgin blatos tou’ iouintutos.
    hunt for the flower of your youth.

    Nu, uoregon, cu, uorigamos,
    Well, wolf, let us play a game,

    lamman, cu, suuercin lingamos,
    let us dance a joyful dance,

    indui uelui cantla canamos!
    let us sing decent songs!

    N’immi mapos, immi drucocu.
    I am not a boy, I am the bad wolf.

    In cetobi selgin agumi,
    In the woods I hunt,

    Ne moi iantus gnaton uorega,
    I don't like children's games,

    iantus drucocunos uoregon,
    I like playing sinister wolf games

    cante toi in medie cete.
    in the depths of the forest, with you.

    Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti. (x2)
    Now only the deep pond awaits me. (x2)

    Cu allate, papon sod urege, eððiIo de iantu in cridie.
    Wild wolf, do whatever your heart longs for,

    VediIumi: cante moi uosta!
    But I beg you: Stay with me!

    Chrigel:

    Ne, a gnata, ne uostami, ne te carami!
    No, girl, I'm not staying with you and don't love you.

    Anna:

    Boua daga uimpi geneta.
    I was a fair and pretty girl.

    Immi trouga, lana nariIas.
    Now I'm poor and overcome with shame.

    Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti. (x2)
    Now only the deep pond awaits me. (x2)
    antox89on March 11, 2010   Link
  • +1
    General CommentHello,

    I don't know gaulish, but I believe there's an error in the translation.

    First, it is clear that verbs in first person present end in -mi
    immi = I am
    carami = I love
    uostami.. etc


    Now I see that you translate "In cetobi selgin agumi" as "in the woods I hunt".



    We know from verses 3 and 5 that "cet-" means forest. So "in cetobi" has be "in the woods", since it uses the preposition "in" plus a declession that is really similar to latin albative. That leaves us with "selgin" and "agumi".

    The next verse is "selgin blatos tou iouintutos" and you translate "hunt for the flower of your youth".
    We already know that "blat-" is flower
    ( Because: Blatus ceti, cantla carami = The forest's flowers and songs I love;; ceti is genitive, cantla is like "chanting" "cantus" "canto" etc in all western languages I can think of)
    And "tou iouintutos" is clearly genitive, "iouintut-" is equivalent to latin "iuentut-" = youth.

    So "selgin" must be the verb "hunt" in both places, and there is no other possibility left since I've found the meaning of the other words. It has to mean "hunt".

    We already noticed that first person present ends in "-mi".
    Selgin does not.
    Agumi does.


    What is "agumi" then? It's not translated!
    I guess that agumi is a verb that denotes a continuous action like "i am used to..", "i usually do..", like latin "soleo". And "selgin"? I believe it is an infinitive. Which is consistent with present-day germanic languages, whose infinitives mostly end in "-en".

    Is that right? If not, what's the meaning of "agumi"?

    -- Andres Baldrich
    Baldrichon October 22, 2010   Link
  • +1
    TranslationThat's an impressive analysis Andres.

    I've studied Scots Gaelic and some Irish (and a bit of Welsh) and there is quite a bit that I recognise in here. I've looked at Gaulish and Cornish before and recognise significant Gaelic matches. Where Scots and Irish Gaelic differ the Gaulish and Cornish words match the Scots Gaelic(Pictish?).

    lana(full) is like lán (full)
    blat- (flower) is like blath (flower)
    cantla(songs) is like caint (chat)
    carami(I love) is like cara(a friend) and mi(I)
    doniobi(beings, people?) is like daoine(people/men) or Welsh dynion(people/men)
    tu is tu (you)
    mape(boy) is like Welsh map(son), Gaelic mac(son)

    Lindos(pool) is like linn(pool) e.g. Dublin / Dubh linn (black pool)

    N’immi mapos, immi drucocu(I'm not a boy I'm the bad wolf) is close to
    Nil mé mac, is mé droch cú (I'm not a son, I'm a bad dog(hunting dog/hound))

    selgin agumi(I hunt) is like Tha sealg agam. Sealg is indeed hunt and agam literally means 'at me' but is used for posession. Tha sgian agam (A knife is at me / I have a knife) but also, as you rightly deduce, can be used to state a habitual activity so Tha sealg agam (I have hunting / I go hunting) instead of selgmi(I hunt) as you pointed out.

    cridie(heart) is like cridhe(heart) in SG and Croí(heart) in Irish

    I don't think the translation is exact I think it has been given a deeper meaning;
    cante clearly means with:
    cante toi (with you)
    cante moi uosta! (with me stay) so uosta means stay and then:
    Ne, a gnata, ne uostami, ne te carami! (No, girl, I'm not staying with you and don't love you.)
    Or more literally: No, girl, not stay me, not you I love (No girl, I won't stay, I don't love you)

    NB That 'a' in 'a gnata'(calling her 'girl') is typical gaelic vocative case. 'hey, a chailíni' (hey girls), 'hello a Chaluim' (hello Calum).

    Then we have present tense Immi(I am) Gaelic=Is mi, changes to past tense Boua(I was) Gaelic=Ba mi

    And then some more embellishing:
    Immi trouga, lana nariIas which they tell us means Now I'm poor and overcome with shame

    Except there is no word for 'now' in there (only implied) and the word given for 'overcome' is in fact lana again which Gaelic suggests means full, complete, total. So it translates more closely as I am poor, full of shame. Oh! and I've just noticed, nariIas(shame) is like Gaelic and Irish náire and Gaelic truagh means wretched/miserable so
    Gaulish Immi trouga, lana nariIas is very close to
    Gaelic Is mi truagh, làn nàire
    English I am wretched, full of shame

    And finally we have Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti, which obviously means I'm off to Dublin to get pissed ;-)

    These can be checked at faclair.com/ (Scots Gaelic) and potafocal.com (Irish)

    rforbeson September 24, 2011   Link
  • 0
    Translation...and the more I think about it the more the last verse is wrong too.

    Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti.
    Now only the deep pond awaits me.

    The Now is implied again, not written so Vrit=For? me=me lindos=pool dubnon must mean black, not deep, Gaelic dubh, Welsh du, Cornish du, piseti=wait

    Here: angelfire.com/me/ik/… PISSIUMI is defined as "I shall see". The -mi suffix clearly means I so the pis- bit must mean Will see. Is that the same as Wait?

    Vrit- me lindos dubnon -piseti.
    For me the black pool waits
    rforbeson September 24, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentChanging my mind again ....

    "The Now is implied again, not written so Vrit=For? me=me lindos=pool dubnon must mean black, not deep, Gaelic dubh, Welsh du, Cornish du, piseti=wait"

    My mistake, Gaelic 'domhain' = deep, Gaulish 'dubnon' = deep. Obvious really.
    rforbeson December 23, 2011   Link

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