"See the Light" as written by and Billie Joe/wright Iii Armstrong....
I crossed the river
Fell into the sea
Where the non-believers
Go beyond belief
Then I scratched the surface
In the mouth of hell
Running out of service
In the blood I fell

Well I - I just want to see the light
And I - I don't want to lose my sight
Well I - I just want to see the light
And I need to know what's worth the fight

I've been wasted
Pills and alcohol
I've been chasing
Down the pool halls
Then I drank the water
From a hurricane
And I set a fire
Just to see the flame

Well I - I just want to see the light
And I - I don't want to lose my sight
Well I - I just want to see the light
And I need to know what's worth the fight

I crossed the desert
Reaching higher ground
Then I pound the pavement
To take the liars down
But it's gone forever
But never too late
Where the ever-after
Is in the hands of fate

Well I - I just want to see the light
And I - I don't want to lose my sight
Well I - I just want to see the light
And I need to know what's worth the fight


Lyrics submitted by bfg1024

"See the Light" as written by Frank E. Billie Joe Armstrong

Lyrics © Warner/Chappell Music, Inc.

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See the Light song meanings
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15 Comments

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  • +7
    General CommentWhy not end off with a revelation? The progression of this album has brought the disillusionment of blind patriotism and blind faith into reality, false ideals which couldn't be sustained. Why not ask for the truth? All that is pure and good.

    All the talk about rivers and water, generally make me think about baptism, rebirth, and the forgiveness of the self.

    This is the appropriate way to end things. It doesn't have to be spiritual, but it does have to represent real change. This is the follow-up to American Idiot I expected, more ambitious, but possibly too abstract. I will look into it deeper in the weeks to come...
    davidecoyoteon May 17, 2009   Link
  • +5
    General CommentHe's talking about losing hope when you no longer have the illusion of a prize ahead of you, particularly in Christian and Gloria's case, because their original drive was a prize that never existed(promised by the "liars" he despises now and seeks to destroy). It's a beautiful rendition of a very real point of view, of anyone once bound in religious brainwashing. He still believes there's hope, he just wants a glimpse of it. Brilliant song.
    spicyfloon May 24, 2009   Link
  • +3
    General Commentafter 8 years of George Bush, he's singing about how it's about time this planet had some hope.
    Lambinioon May 15, 2009   Link
  • +3
    My Interpretation21st Century Breakdown is about the great American conflict; the battle between the political "Left" and "Right;" the battle between Liberalism and Conservatism. The album creates a feeling like the future looking back at the past. It seems like a life story an old man tells his kids.

    The album follows the story of Christian and Gloria, of the class of '13. (The class that are high school freshmen at the time the album was released.) Christian is first introduced in the song “21st Century Breakdown.” Christian is growing up and realizing the government in his world is corrupt. He and his classmates were raised by the “Bastards of 1969.” He rejects society because the few and powerful misguide the hardworking citizens. Christian left high school, but never made it as a “working class hero,” he decided instead to go to the streets and preach his story. “Know Your Enemy” follows Christian's quest. Ironically, Billy Joe himself is reflected in Christian's character. They both become “punks” who reject popular culture.

    Gloria is introduced in the next track, “Viva la Gloria!” On his quest, Christian meets a girl unlike anyone he'd ever met. Gloria is an idealistic youth, who unlike Christian, accepts society and covets its ideas like religion. In the second half of the song, Gloria abandons her life for her new love. However, Christian will eventually change Gloria. The song “Before the Lobotomy” contrasts her lives. The “Lobotomy” represents Christian's process of Liberalizing Gloria. Now, Gloria is no longer an innocent youth. She sprays graffiti and doing drugs. She's completely lost the connection with her old life. She no longer feels in touch with God. To Christian's dismay, Gloria is deeply disturbed by her changes. “Christian's Inferno” is Gloria's predicament. She loves Christian, but she has to be a sinner to be with him.

    During “Last Night On Earth,” Gloria decides to stay with Christian, living her life like it's the last day on earth. “East Jesus Nowhere” thickens the plot. Christian's war has escalated. He asks Gloria to fully devote to his way of thinking. The puppy love stage of their relationship is over. “Peacemaker” is from the viewpoint of the class of '69. They accuse of being Christian a non-believer and an infidel. They beg Gloria to leave him. The story has mirrored that of Romeo and Juliet. Juliet/Gloria's “family” have formed a violent mob chanting “death to the ones at the end of the serenade!” “Last of the American Girls” is Gloria's reaction. She has decided to stand up for what she believes and leave Christian. She is special, not because she holds true to her values, but because she recognizes the faults in society and still holds her values.

    “Murder City” and “Restless Heart Syndrome” are about their break-up. Christian has turned alcohol to cope. Gloria is better off, she just wants a cigarette, haha. Gloria, on the other hand, has no where to go now that she has left Christian. Her old family will no longer accept her now that she has been tainted by Christian. “Horseshoes and Handgrenades” is Christian's “fuck you” to Gloria. His situation has escalated to self destruction. He blames the old age for all of his problems.

    “The Static Age” eludes that Christian has died, presumably from his own self-destructive spiral and motivation to destroy the establishment. The song doubles as a reference that mass media has lost all meaning and also a symbol that Christian's war has ended. There is “static” in the radio because Christian's war has no leader, or perhaps that Christian has martyred himself to destroy the old age. “21 Guns” Shows the tragedy of his death. Gloria blames herself for leaving him.

    The last two tracks, “American Eulogy” and “See the Light” seem to be a shift from Christian and Gloria's story to the bigger picture. Either Christian's war for Liberalism or the Old Age's Conservatism has won. Either way, Gloria doesn't want to live in the modern world. If Liberalism has won, Gloria is the last rebel sinking into the underground, hoping for salvation from her sins. If the Old Age has won, Gloria is the last rebel hoping for a one day free society. She has taken higher ground. She realizes this isn't her fight, because it's not worth fighting for. She recognizes that the “ever after” is “in the hands of fate.”
    TheX13on September 29, 2013   Link
  • +1
    General Commentawesome song! but did anyone else find it sounds similar to "Died in your Arms Tonight" by Cutting Crew?
    LicenseToChillon May 16, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is really good.... it sounds a lot like something The Who would do. very good. I love the chorus
    new moon123on May 15, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commentperfect way to end the album, i'm alreayd anticipating their next one... if they make a next one, that is.
    deliiroaron June 01, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt almost seems like Christian took his shot at taking down the 'liars' but missed and now he's waiting for another chance.


    I crossed the desert
    Reaching higher ground
    Then I pound the pavement
    To take the liars down
    But its gone forever
    But never too late
    Where the ever after
    Is in the hands of fate
    Hero of the Dayon June 05, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI watched Billie Joe talk about this song on a video, and I think, if I remember, he said it was about someone trying not to lose their faith, especially concerning religious views. How it seems there is nothing to believe in.
    hope19on June 14, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"Then I drank the water
    From a hurricane"


    Anyone else think that's a metaphor for Katrina?
    idonthavefleason July 19, 2009   Link

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