"Salome" as written by and Peter Doherty Michael Whitnall....
In the cold, the coldest of nights
The fire I light, to warm my bones
I've had enough, of the dreadful cold
And from the flames, appears Salome

I stand before her amazed
As she dances and demands
The head of John the Baptist on a plate

In the morning, shaken and disturbed
From under soft white fur
I see the dust in the morning bright sets the room alive
And by the telly appears Salome

I stand before her amazed
As she dances and demands
The head of Isadora Duncan on a plate
Oh, it's Salome
Oh, it's Salome

In the cold, the coldest of nights
The fire I light, to warm my bones
I've had enough, of the dreadful cold
And from the flames, appears Salome

I stand before her amazed
As she dances and demands
The head of any bastard on a plate


Lyrics submitted by applebuttaz1212, edited by azkm

Salome song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentThe song refers to Oscar Wilde who wrote a play about Salome. Doherty is a massive admirer of Wilde. The atmosphere in the song also recalls the paintings from Gustave Moreau, they both are major figures of european Art of the XIXth century, a romantic period in many ways.
    Salome's story is part of an episode of Matthew and Marc's gospel. She was Herodiade's daughter, who did marry King Herode. Salome was divine and she was able to obtain everything in the world by her charms and the grace of her dancing skills. Once she was dancing for Herode Antipas, he fell in love and asked her what he could give, she turned to her mother and Herodiade said "the head of John the Baptist." Herode gave it to Salome on a plate, and she gave it to her mother.
    In the song, Doherty mentions Isadora Duncan who was probably the greatest dancer of all times. She could have been a rival for Salome.
    With a legend like that, it's easy to rely with the pain a man can have with girls. At the end of the song, Pete adds "as she dances and demands the head of any bastard on a plate." Pete is the bastard in question. He's hypnotized and consents to give his own head. Salome is Kate Moss or whoever you want.
    LonerLondoneron August 20, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthe image of john the baptists head on a plate comes from the love song of j. alfred prufrock.
    LeopoldSampsoniteon September 15, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSuch a beautiful song. And what a fine and gentle segue it has with A Little Death Around the Eyes. I can't even divide them really
    ShoopDeLangon November 09, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSuch a beautiful song. And what a fine and gentle segue it has with A Little Death Around the Eyes. I can't even divide them really
    ShoopDeLangon November 09, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commenten.wikipedia.org/wiki/… <--- this explains a lot! :D

    i loved this song.. and I love it even more now, after I understood what it meant :)
    raindrops2goon April 05, 2010   Link
  • 0
    Lyric CorrectionNothing more to add about this song's meaning, but the lyrics aren't complete nor exact. Here are what I believe is slightly better. Please bare with my English.

    -- Lyrics:

    In the cold, the coldest of nights
    The fire I light, to warm my bones
    I've had enough, of the dreadful cold
    And from the flames, appears Salome

    I stand before her amazed
    As she dances and demands
    The head of John the Baptist on a plate

    In the morning, shaken and disturbed
    From under soft white fur
    I see the dust in the morning bright sets the room alive
    And by the telly appears Salome

    I stand before her amazed
    As she dances and demands
    The head of Isadora Duncan on a plate
    Oh, it's Salome
    Oh, it's Salome

    In the cold, the coldest of nights
    The fire I light, to warm my bones
    I've had enough, of the dreadful cold
    And from the flames, appears Salome

    I stand before her amazed
    As she dances and demands
    The head of any bastard on a plate

    -- Corrections:

    # Added "the" before coldest, first line
    # Changed "Oh love, had enough of ..." to "I've had enough". It's believe it's what P. Doherty says
    # John the Baptist is a proper name, needs capital letters
    # Changed Isidora Duncan to Isadora Duncan, her actual name
    # Added the third and last verse
    Bencorion May 12, 2012   Link

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