"New Love Grows on Trees" as written by Stephen Street and Pete Doherty....
Are you still talking to
All of those dead film stars
Like you used to
And are you still thinking of
All of those pretty rhymes
And perfect crimes
Like you used to..

And if you're still alive
When you're twenty five
Shall I kill you like you asked me to?
If you're still alive
When you're twenty five
Shall I kill you I know you told me to
But I really don't want to

I remember every single thing you said to me
You played the man and I was Calvary
And you said, ah you said
New love grows on trees
New love grows on trees
New love grows... New love grows on trees!
If you please and if you don't please

That makes perfect nonsense to me
As a price of being free these days
It's ridiculous...

Are you still shaking out
All the dead wood from your bed love
Like you used to?
Well times don't change and
Are you still thinkin of
All of those perfect rhymes for love divine?
Oh no, you really don't have to
If you're still alive
When you're twenty five
Oh, should I kill you like you asked me to?
If you're still alive
When you're twenty five
Should I kill you?
You told me to,
But I really don't want to

I remember every single thing you said to me
You played the man, and I was Calvary

You said new love grows on trees
New love grows on trees
New love grows... New love grow on trees


Lyrics submitted by applebuttaz1212

"New Love Grows on Trees" as written by Stephen Street Peter Martin Doherty

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New Love Grows on Trees song meanings
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  • +4
    My InterpretationLyrically this song is pretty interesting. Been pointed out elsewhere that this was written during The Libertines days, somewhere after Up The Bracket as they played it during the Babyshambles Sessions in New York. After "And if your still alive, when your 25, shall I kill you, like you asked me to, but I really don't want to..." Carl interrupts:
    "
    Carl: I never asked you to

    Pete: It's just a song"

    Which suggests the song is about Pete and Carl and their relationship and the effect being in music has had on them. In particular, Peter seems to feel he is in Carl's shadow: "You played the man and I was Calvary", a reference to the people who were crucified behind Jesus and a word also used to mean Hell on Earth.
    Interestingly also it seems to be mirrored by other songs. It feels to me like the more poetic (and perhaps less desperate) version of Gang of Gin, but that might be personal. Also, in Gin and Milk by Dirty Pretty Things, Carl sings "You wont really see me, I live in old movies...", another interesting mirror image between the Libertines
    Arete91on April 28, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentArete91 that's interesting because I'm pretty sure I read in Pete Doherty: On The Edge that he and Carl hit a low point sometime in the early days and actually made a death pact, on the banks of a river in London if my memory serves me. The honesty of the statement, I have no idea about. But I'm certain that I did read it.
    poolshark86on October 16, 2010   Link

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