"The Hazards of Love 2 (Wager All)" as written by and Colin Meloy....
William:
And here I am, softer than a shower
And here I am, to garland you with flowers
To lay you down in a clover bed
The stars a roof above our heads

And all my life I've never felt the tremor
And all my life, that now disturbs my fingers
I'll lay you down in a clover bed
The stars, a roof above our heads

And we'll lie until the Corn Crake crows
Bereft of the weight of our summer clothes
And I'd wager all
The hazards of love
The hazards of love

And take my hand and cradle it in your hand
And take my hand, feel the pull, the quicksand
I'll lay you down in a clover bed
The stars, a roof above our heads

And we'll lie until the Corn Crake crows
Bereft of the weight of our summer clothes
And I'd wager all
The hazards of love
The hazards of love
The hazards of love
The hazards of love


Lyrics submitted by MarcelLionheart

The Hazards of Love 2 (Wager All) song meanings
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  • 0
    General CommentPretty sure this is sung from the beast-guy

    He talks about showering her with love

    My whole life I have never had such strong emotion/felt love and therefore I am shaking
    I'll lay you down in a clover bed
    The stars, a roof above our heads

    And we'll lie till the Corn Crake [a small bird, like a pheasant] crows
    totally neked
    And I am willing to take a risk and devote my life to you
    The hazards of love (what the hell am I getting myself into)
    The hazards of love (ball-and-chain?)

    We can sorta sink into the soft ground cover
    I'll lay you down in a clover bed
    The stars, a roof above our heads


    [And in case anyone is wondering, I did the research and Corn Crakes actually do live in taiga habitats. Also, buttercups do too. Although this setting could be in the Northernmost US States or Russia, I think I imagine this story taking place in one of the Scandinavian countries. Colin clearly does his research first.]
    wanderingaloudon March 12, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commentso...
    1. this song is beautiful
    2. is this william to her, or her to william
    was william the beast in the forest? or is the beast a 3rd guy
    elgrondy31on March 22, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentWilliam is the one singing this song to Margaret. He spends the day wandering in the form of a fawn, which is how Margaret originally found him. At night, he's a man. So here in this song, he's a man, doing manly things with his lover, Margaret.
    And it's freaking BEAUTIFUL.

    BTWz, the story's set roughly in the Scotland area.
    jxnarcoticzon March 22, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the hazards of love mentioned in the song refer to the possibility of heartache, etc. William is willing to take the risks because his love is strong.
    squallshaperon March 25, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI'm listening to the album in order, and this is my favorite so far. Beautiful, beautiful.
    carolinda583on March 31, 2009   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationConsidering I thought in the last song that Margaret was going into labor and was calling for William to help her...i think this is probably him comforting her. Maybe helping her give birth and helping her through the pain by singing this song to her. If you notice, the tune of hazards of love has changed for this song and i think its because its a different type of love for william...a love for his child and for Margaret.
    musicismylife926on April 09, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentHe's saying that he doesn't care that his mother is evil and Margaret's pregnant, he just wants to love her. I don't think she's giving birth yet, because lots of stuff happens to her and she doesn't seem to have a baby with her, so she's probably still pregnant.
    sourfruiton April 19, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General Commentgood hook

    And I'd wager all
    The hazards of love

    nice clean images
    Matt Holckon April 28, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentOne of the prettiest songs to ever come from the Decemberists... love it. :)
    SkylinePigeonon May 06, 2009   Link
  • 0
    My InterpretationTwo clues should lead us to think the setting for this suite is what is now the United Kingdom. The first reference is to Offa's Wall (also called Offa's Dyke) which is an earthen mound 176 miles long and up to 65 feet wide and 8 feet high constructed by King Offa of Mercia (later Wales) in the 8th century AD to mark the boundry between his kingdom and England to the east. Apparently it was customary for the English to cut off the ears of Mercians who strayed east of the wall and for the Mercians to hang every Englishman who crossed it going west. So, when the lyrics tell us that Margaret went riding out "Past the pale (boundary) of Offa's Wall..." I'm inclined to think that she is leaving her native Wales, and at some risk.
    The second clue to the setting would be the reference to the crossing of the Annan River ("Annan Water")which lies in the south of Scotland. William seeks to cross the Annan on his own and out of Scotland in order to rescue his love after The Queen has flown Margaret and her captor, The Rake, to the other side back toward Wales (see below). But William makes a bargain with the river in order to get across that later turns fatal to both him and his love when they try to return north across it. ("The Drowned")
    Although Great Britain would no longer be considered part of the Taiga due to its extensive deforestation, during the time period in which this tale is ostensibly set (probably mid-12th to late 15th century from Meloy's Middle-English references) relatively large expanses of boreal forest still existed, particularly in northern Scotland.
    From all this I am inclined to think that our heroine, Margaret, hails from Wales and William from the Highlands of Scotland. The Rake, is most probably also from Wales given the name of his ill-fated last daughter, Myfanwy, which is Welsh for "my woman."
    A further hint that this story does not take place in Scandinavia is the reference to the mistle thrush which, although common in Great Britain and most of the rest of Europe, is not native to the Scandinavian countries. On the other hand, the corncrake, once common in the UK and much of northern and central Europe to Siberia including southern Scandinavia, is now restricted in range in Great Britain to the northern and western islands of Scotland. (note Meloy's earlier reference to corncrakes in "The Bachelor and The Bride" from "Her Majesty")
    One question that remains in my mind, though, is whether the lyric is meant to be "fawn" as in young deer or "faun" as in the half-man, half-goat mythical creature? The latter would seem more likely in light of the line "Bereft of the weight of our summer clothes" and the fact that the faun was sometimes depicted wearing a loin cloth or little vest.
    odonataon May 12, 2009   Link

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