"Meadowlark" as written by and Stephen Schwartz....
Meadowlark, fly away down
I hold a cornucopia and a golden crown
For you to wear upon your fleeced down

My meadowlark sing to me

Hummingbird, just let me die
Inside the broken ovals of your olive eyes
I do believe you gave it your best try

My hummingbird sing to me,
My hummingbird sing to me

Don't believe a word that I haven't heard
Little children laughing at the boys and girl
The meadowlark singing to you each and everyday
The arc light on the hill side and the market in the hay


Lyrics submitted by chickenflicker, edited by bilboswagins, PouletSansNom

"Meadowlarks" as written by Stephen Schwartz

Lyrics © IMAGEM MUSIC INC

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Meadowlarks song meanings
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16 Comments

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  • +4
    General CommentIs this song from a flower's or plant's perspective?
    Neonnoodleon August 30, 2008   Link
  • +2
    General Comment"Meadowlark, fly your way down"
    On a surface level, I think the persona is literally watching a bird and wishing it to fly closer. But on a connotative level, they are thinking about someone else; perhaps a girl?

    "I hold a cornucopia and a golden crown"
    A "cornucopia" is a symbol of food. Again, with the literal bird, he [the persona] merely wants to feed the bird. But on a deeper meaning, he is offering his symbol of food to the girl he likes [sorry that I’m assuming the persona is a guy, and that he loves a girl, it’s just easier to talk about].
    "Cornucopia" also links to a story of Zeus, which could be him saying he will protect her and give her whatever she wants. In the story, Zeus accidently broke one of the horn's off a goat whom he was friends with. He felt bad that he'd damaged her, and so gave her the horn back which then had supernatural powers.
    I think the golden crown just symbolises his feelings for her; she is a lot better than him, or out of his reach. Again, going back to the bird, he cannot reach the meadowlark but he is desperate to do so.

    "For you to wear upon your fleecy gown"
    I’m sure it says "gown" rather than "down".
    A bird’s feathers/a girl’s clothes/a queen’s robes? (Going back to the crown and Zeus idea)

    "A meadowlark sing to me"
    He wants to hear the bird sing.
    He’s desperate for the girl he likes.

    "Hummingbird, just let me dive"
    I think here, he is directly addressing the girl. I think that the meadowlark was literal, whereas the hummingbird is metaphorical for the girl.

    "Inside the broken ovals of your olive eyes"
    Pretty self explanatory... He wants to delve into the girl’s eyes.

    "I do believe you gave it your best try"
    Here, I think it’s a bit subjective. This part’s probably too personal to get exactly right, but my own opinion is that these two were together, but for some reason it’s ended.
    Also, as hummingbird’s are more wild, rare and special than meadowlarks, it seems as though he isn’t blaming the girl for things not working out. Maybe she's just not the type of girl who can be tied down as she'd feel trapped? Birds are meant to be free and wild etc.

    "My hummingbird sing to me"
    I’m sure it says "my" rather than "a", which again backs up the previous point about them being together at some point.

    "Mmmmmmm...
    My hummingbird sing to me"

    "Don't believe a word that I haven't heard"
    This is a pure guess, and to be honest it’s probably wrong, but maybe there are rumours going around about the boy? He’s telling the girl that she shouldn’t believe anything that he hasn’t heard, because if he hasn’t heard it then it isn’t true. As I said, it’s probably wrong, but that’s how I interpreted it.

    "Little children laughing at the boys and girl"
    I think it’s important that there are many boys, but only one girl. But I’m not really sure what it means. The girl could be wanted by a lot of people? That fits with the hummingbird thing that they are a pretty rare species. Not really sure about that though. Anyone wanna help?

    "The meadowlark singing to you each and every day"
    I think this goes back to the literal meaning of "meadowlark", and that this bird is singing to his "hummingbird" (the girl he likes). Perhaps he has gone to near where she lives and is seeing/hearing the bird that she sees/hears?

    "The arc-line on the hillside and the market in the hay"
    As before, I think he might just be looking around near where the girl lives.

    "Ooooh..."

    Sorry this is so long!
    I know I kind of analysed it a bit too much, but I really love the song and just wanted to understand it more. Agree/disagree with me because I’m really not certain of any of that and other interpretations are always helpful :)
    Whatever it means, it’s one of the most beautiful songs I’ve ever heard.
    GoldJesteron October 06, 2009   Link
  • +1
    General CommentI think this might be a song about a Sunflower.

    Meadowlark, fly your way down
    I hold a cornucopia and a golden crown
    For you to wear upon your fleecy down
    My Meadowlark sing to me

    -The Sunflower is wanting for the Meadowlark to come down and feed upon its seeds, the golden crown being its petals.

    Hummingbird, just let me die
    Inside the broken ovals of your olive eyes
    I do believe you gave it your best try
    My Hummingbird sing to me
    Mmmmmmm...
    My Hummingbird sing to me

    -The Sunflower wants so badly to peer into the eyes of the Hummingbird as it feeds upon it, but for some reason either the Hummingbird is not able to feed (not it's food source) or doesn't want to feed on the Sunflower, thus the Sunflower settles for just being able to hear the Hummingbird sing.

    Don't believe a word that I haven't heard
    Little children laughing at the boys and girl
    The meadowlark singing to you each and every day
    The arch-light on the hillside and the market in the hay

    Here I think we have observations held by the Sunflower being relayed to us, such as a person saying "Don't believe a word that I haven't heard" Little boys and girls laughing and playing, the Meadowlark singing everyday, and a light on a hill or a market near a field.

    As a whole, this song feels like a song of longing, of wanting to be something more, but still content, at least to me. It's hauntingly beautiful.
    Wingdingoon March 16, 2011   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the first open space is...

    "Inside the broken ovals of your olive eyes."

    and the last line is maybe...

    "the arch-line on the hillside and the market in the hay"

    Great song though! one of my favorites.
    Kraghon May 21, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think the last line is the arc light on the hillside...

    Arc lights were used in the 19th century to light up public spaces. I think it brings to mind a bunch of market stalls in an an Appalachian town in maybe 1901. Just the image I see. Beautiful, mournful song.
    songyoneon July 10, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentsongyone I think you're right. It's a great image and it's just like the Foxes to have a reference like that.
    cobsteron October 20, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentsongyone I think you're right. It's a great image and it's just like the Foxes to have a reference like that.
    cobsteron October 20, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentAfter "hummingbird, just let me" I believe it's either "die" or "dive". I'm leaning more towards "die".
    mithgilon February 05, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love this song! Its so beautiful and it has a sort of simplicity to it. I also think that this song would have been a good song to play at the prom scene in Twilight! (Just my opinion.) Fleet Foxes is a great band and i would love to see them in concert. :)
    lala_zeuson February 16, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIt is actually "Oh hummingbird let me die." not "down".

    This song gets to me a lot sometimes it makes
    me want to cry, can't explain why, but it does.

    Great song. <3
    pecknoldbanharton March 16, 2009   Link

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