"The All Golden" as written by and Van Dyke Parks....
He is not your run-of-the-mill garden variety Alabama country fare
Left on Silver Lake he keeps a small apartment top an Oriental food store there
He returned from Alabama to see what he could see

Off the record he is hungry though he works hard in his Alabama country fair
I should think he'd fade away the way that Bohemians often bare the frigid air
He returned from Alabama to see what he could see

Constant commentary by the wayside
Nowadays them country boys don't cotton much to one two three four
Rest your team. Work out in the All Golden
You will know why hayseeds go back to the country

Constant calm might still our stately union. Nowadays a Yankee dread not take his time to wend to sea
Forget to bear your arms in the All Golden
You will know why hayseeds go back to the country
Might as well not 'low for one more go round
That's all folks
Them hayseeds go back to the country
Ja git it? Alright


Lyrics submitted by Fidelio-Roo, edited by lilysinclair

"The All Golden" as written by Van Dyke Parks

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  • 0
    General CommentI applaud anyone who is able to decipher VDP's lyrics. =\
    blackled222on August 08, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentLyric Corrections:
    Firstly, I think the real title is The All Golden.

    Secondly, I think the word is "fare" in the first line, not "faire".

    Thirdly, I think the line "Nowadays a Yankee dread not take his time to wend to sea." is "Nowadays a Yankee dreadnought takes his time to wend to sea."

    Opinion:
    "Constant commentary by the wayside / Nowadays them country boys don't cotton much to one two three four." is some sort of reference to the antebellum south. The usage of the word cotton is deliberate wordplay, possibly just reminding us of the south's history of slaver. I think the one two three four part is meant to mean the military --I suppose he is saying that the country boys don't like the draft.

    "Constant calm might still our stately union. / Nowadays a Yankee dread not take his time to wend to sea." This is some sort of reference to the civil war. Dreadnoughts are gun-heavy battleships, and ironclad gunships played an important role in the civil war.

    The whole album is a kind of Whitmanesque tour of America, so I guess it's some sort of analysis of the deep south. I'm seeing pieces here but not really getting the whole picture, sadly.
    emueyeson April 10, 2009   Link

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