"The Whaler" as written by Edward Carrington Breckenridge, James Riley Breckenridge, Dustin Michael Kensrue and Teppei Teranishi....
My lover's arms
Well they beg me to stay
I know the stars
They will sweep me away
My daughter's eyes
They are two tiny seas
Whose water will rise
And they will run down her cheeks

[Chorus:]
Father where do you go?
So far out upon the sea
when are you coming home to me?
Darling, why do you leave?
The north wind begins to blow
Will you be coming home to me?

The boat and the plank
They are all that I know
The sea calls my name
And so I must go
While they still sleep
I slip out the door
How can I leave when my anchor's ashore

[Chorus]


Lyrics submitted by WinterKiss

"The Whaler" as written by Edward Carrington Breckenridge Dustin Michael Kensrue

Lyrics © Universal Music Publishing Group

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The Whaler song meanings
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33 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentThis is one of the most beautiful songs i have ever heard in my life, if not the most beautiful. and yes, Dustin's daughter's name is definetely Sailor.
    danknuggaon October 16, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI am going to cry. Beautiful song.

    This has to be about Dustin personally. I think it is probably about him going off to make music or play shows, all the while leaving his 9 month old daughter and wife at home.
    sabioon October 13, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI agree with sabio...this has to be about missing his family while touring. The line "how can I leave with my anchors ashore" is particularly moving.

    This is a REALLY moving song. amazing.
    elbeast120on October 14, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThe song definitely metaphorically applies to Dustin and his family, but I think it's an expression of a story archetype as well.

    The idea of the father leaving his family because of duty, or passion, or even to provide for them, is used in countless stories. Sometimes, the father is drafted into the military; occasionally, he volunteers out of duty to his country; or, it could be more mundane, like being forced to travel for his work, just to be able to provide for his children and his wife.

    In fact, it could even apply to my own father's life - when I was a young child, he was regularly forced to make business trips to deal with customers, and would be gone for weeks at a time.
    DubbaEwwTeeEffon October 15, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMan, when I listen to this song I keep thinking about that one scene in The Patriot. You know the little girl refuses to talk because her dad (Mel Gibson) keeps leaving to go out and fight. And then one time he is leaving and she bursts out "Daddy, daddy don't leave. I'll say anything." That always gets me choked up haha.

    This song remind me of that.
    sabioon October 15, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentDustins daughter is named Sailor...
    Sojourneymanon October 16, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentcool

    ...nice song
    Ruttikerson October 16, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentMy favorite off the new albumn
    iamthenightstarson October 16, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is definitly a metaphor for Dustin's life in the band.

    He is The Whaler.

    He longs for his family; they are the most important thing to him.

    But he is also driven by his passion for music, and that leads him down many other roads in many different places.

    incredible song.
    The Resonatoron October 17, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Commentthis is definitly a metaphor for Dustin's life in the band.

    He is The Whaler.

    He longs for his family; they are the most important thing to him.

    But he is also driven by his passion for music, and that leads him down many other roads in many different places.

    incredible song.
    The Resonatoron October 17, 2007   Link

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