I am made of tons of tiny countries
With closely guarded borders
Each country has a castle
Each castle has a throne
You are the tiny king
Of your very own

I sneak across at night
When the crossing is easy
I watch and I wonder
At your curious customs,
But I forget them all by day

Did the night invade the day?
Or was it day invaded night?
Were you among the last to be found?
Did you have your hands
In the ground?

I buried the dead and they came stories
I planted the stories, they came up singing
I planted the song and it came up dancing
I buried the dance and it
Came up facing home

I buried the dead and they came laughing
I planted the laugher, it came up singing
I planted the song and it came up fighting
I buried the battle, it came up facing home

I buried the dead and they came up laughing
I buried the laughter and cried

This garden we’ve planted will come up around us
And take us all down in a great big avalanche
Of useless things, of persistently plastic things,
Of things that cost us this tiny world of tiny kings


Lyrics submitted by Lachrymal Cloud

Angle of Repose song meanings
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  • 0
    General Comment"This garden we’ve planted will come up around us
    And take us all down in a great big avalanche
    Of useless things, of persistently plastic things,
    Of things that cost us this tiny world of tiny kings"

    If the garden is industry and all it's products (including pollution and corruption) and the narrator "I" is the earth it's self then the song can easily take the form of a warning to consumerism.
    newexperimenton November 30, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think it's about how the banality of existence drives us mad, because we're supposed to be curious and explorative of things, yet we can't hold onto the significance of those, ie. we "forget them all by day". It's about facing the chaotic, psychological hell of the meaninglessness of life, to put it simply. It's actually portrayed very disturbingly in this song because Carla (the violinist who sings this song) starts out indeed in almost a child-like hush, a curious, semi-innocent tone, but by the time of "I buried the laughter and cried" she's gone completely insane with despair. That moment usually makes me shed a tear, it's so powerful.
    marathon_81on March 21, 2010   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think it's giving our planet a voice as something seperated, and over all opposed, to humanity. We are the worm-like subjects of it's ironically human-like narrative, suggesting the pervesity not of the hyuman genus, but of human progression. The lyrics establish itself on the notion of heiarchy amoungst humans, one of our most distinct traits of division, and automatically asserts the idea that the globe is speaking as a subject to us as parasites. The nursury rhyme like nature of the first verse also asserts an air of infantile simplicity in this panthiest, yet nihilistic vision of us, and creates an eerie sense of inevitability and immediancy in our coming demise mentioned at the end, the 'avalanche' of our customs- as it is reminiscent of the taunting, mechanuical nature of a child's chant.
    I'm drawn to the line 'Or was it day that invaded night' as it is a very direct inversion of human ideals- we feel as an innate habit that nocturnal hours are contrary to life, thus are evil and restrictive, yet by the definitions of the ambivalant earth night and day intersect equally- our 'season' is given no special significance against the behemoth of prevalant nature, which will indeed be our demise over 'persistantly plastic things'.
    I also find the notion of 'tiny kings' impressive as this is conveyed clearly by the childlike simplicity of the stanza, which observes us from a celestial perspective, making human-contrived status irrelivant so long as the world, or at least us, are terminated. In fact, our death means little compared to the rest of nature: are drawn lines and borders are virulent and needs to be purged.
    The reference to burying and planting of humanity's customs shows the persistance of our existance, and the selectivity of burying the 'dead', the 'battle' and the 'dancing' as opposed to the planting of 'songs', 'laughter' and 'stories' shows prefence to man in metaphysical form, the spiritual outlets of humanity, as human in activity (thus the movement invovle in dancing as oppsed to singing) equates to death, or at least pestilance and ultimately pointlessness.
    Overall, as is typical of Sleepytime Gorilla Museum, humanity is made a spectacle as something meaningless, a spectacle to things we cannot deny nor understand- thus the ironic use of a very human voice for the earth. It is contradictorary that we are seen as meaningless, yet these lyrics are a meaningful striving to understand things (art), and ironically done or not, this only in turn shows their is more beyond us, whether it is the worms below our feet or the skies above.
    whatthemehon August 02, 2010   Link

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