"Sweet City Woman" as written by and Richard Dodson....
Well, I'm on my way
To the city lights,
To the pretty face
That shines her light on the city nights
And I gotta catch a noon train,
I gotta be there on time.
Oh, it feels so good to know she waits at the end of the line.

Sweet, sweet city woman,
I can see your face, I can hear your voice,
I can almost touch you.
Sweet, sweet city woman,
And the banjo and me, we got a feel for singing, yeah, yeah.

Bon, c'est bon, bon, bon, c'est bon, bon
Bon, c'est bon, bon, bon, bon, bon.
Bon, c'est bon, bon, bon, c'est bon, bon
Bon, c'est bon, bon, bon, bon, bon.

So long, ma.
So long, pa.
So long, neighbors and friends.

Like a country morning,
All snuggled in dew,
Ah, she's got a way to make a man feel shiny and new
And she sing in the evening
Old, familiar tunes
And she feeds me love and tenderness and macaroons.

Sweet, sweet city woman,
I can see your face, I can hear your voice,
I can almost touch you.
Sweet, sweet city woman,
And the banjo and me, we got a feel for singing.

Sweet, sweet city woman
Oh she's my sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Sweet, sweet city woman
oh my sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Everybody.
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.
Sweet, sweet, sweet, sweet city woman.


Lyrics submitted by SurfingHobo

"Sweet City Woman" as written by Richard Dodson

Lyrics © Peermusic Publishing

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Sweet City Woman song meanings
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3 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentI LOVE THIS SONG.

    And I can't believe I'm the only comment. D: I hear an echo.
    Mowthwaushon November 23, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentrefreshing song from that era - liked the banjo playing
    with the reference to his banjo in the lyrics - as far as
    the interp, it could be your usual hayseed-coming-to-
    the-city to see his fine lady scenario - or it could be
    a guy returning to the City and all of the good things
    his woman offers - either way, something a little bit
    different - did the Stampeders have anything else?
    rockboy52on January 12, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General CommentStampeders were from Calgary, Alberta (Canada)..named for famous 'Calgary Stampede' rodeo festival. The French in the song (Bon, c'est bon..and 'macaroons'..should be macarons, but that doesn't rhyme) leads me to believe he's singing about taking a train from to Montreal, Quebec, where they speak French, to see his Québeçois girlfriend.
    All these years and I never knew that it was 'Bon, c'est bon!'
    ** there is no train service directly from Calgary to Montreal, it's about 15 hours from Edmonton Alberta to Montreal by train.. maybe he was living closer to her when he wrote the song**
    anon111402on March 11, 2018   Link

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