Was it worth five deaths in just 400 days?
30 plus suicides put the world in a daze.
Hit by a plane and open for business on Monday,
What more is there to say?

Shreve, Lamb and Harmon I salute you,
Tell me a story or a hundred-and-two.
The chimp can eat his peach,
But up to heaven you still reach.

So it was hard times at first,
But you were out to quench your thirst.
Today you graze in pastures green,
Incomparilbe to where you've been.

Shreve, Lamb and Harmon I salute you,
Tell me a story or a hundred-and-two.
The chimp can eat his peach,
But up to heaven you still reach.

With your seven sisters all in love,
You became the symbolic dove.
Torré Latinoamericana's role model,
Live forever: immortal.

Shreve, Lamb and Harmon I salute you,
Tell me a story or a hundred-and-two.
The chimp can eat his peach,
But up to heaven you still reach.


Lyrics submitted by theflamehaired1

The Amata song meanings
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    General CommentFrom a friend too lazy to make his own account:
    "Les Pêches's fantastic follow-up effort of 'That Woman', 'The Amata', has simply stunned critics the world over. For those who thought they were a one-hit-wonder, this is a dazzling proof that these guys have a lot still to come...

    For those who thought songwriting is a linear, single-leveled affair, here's the definitive evidence against. 'The Amata' is elementally about the poetry of music - though its intentions is bemusing. However, I believe I have cracked it. And I am, to put it in the only way I can at the moment, well chuffed. It tells the story of the construction and life of the Empire State Building.

    Proof of this is woven cryptically into the song... Unless, of course, you are interested in architecture - then it gets a little easier. The Empire State building is 102 storeys high. "Tell me a story or a hundred-and-two." plays on the homophone of story/storey.

    The Empire State Building was also hit by a plane, and miraculously was barely affected as "Hit by a plane and open for business on Monday," suggests.

    "Was it worth five deaths in just 400 days?
    30 plus suicides put the world in a daze." Is a tribute to the brave construction workers who fearlessly laboured on the dizzyingly high structure; and also the people who were tired of life and took their final leap into oblivion...

    More comically, "The chimp can eat his peach," refers to King Kong, the oversized chimp that scaled the tower in the film of the same name.

    Finally, the dead give-away to anyone know knows anything about famous buildings, the firm that created the Empire State Building, Shreve, Lamb and Harmon, are mentioned, also. Thus concluding that the subject is all about the good ol' ESB. I still prefer the Chrysler Building, personally.

    Of course, the poetry is exquisite - the rhetorical questions asking the reader/listener to consider the point behind the behemoth of the NY skyline - the immediately apparent wonder at the structure - the 'aabb' rhyming structure ties everything together. C'est Magnifique!

    We all desperately await the next hit Pêches!"

    Also the title.
    "Theamata" is greek for "Must-see", as in wonders of the world.
    And "Amata" means deathlessness.
    Nice bit of ambiguity there.

    The Torré Latinoamericana is a smaller building in Mexico, with a similar design to the ESB and the 7Sisters refers to another skyscraper in Russia.

    The 2nd verse talks about how the ESB was empty for long periods after opening due to the depression but how ambition drove it forward and how now it is symbolic of great things.

    Also a religious connotation to the lines:
    "Today you graze in pastures green,
    Incomparilbe to where you've been."
    Links to "The Lord is my Shepard" etc. Also suggestion of Heaven being incomparible to Earth; mirroring the growth of the status of the Empire State Building.

    Great tune, especially in the chorus, very catchy!
    Love it!
    theflamehaired1on March 27, 2007   Link

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