"Weeping" as written by and Thomas Fox Daniel Heymann....
I knew a man who lived in fear
It was huge, it was angry
It was drawing near
Behind his house a secret place
Was the shadow of the demon
He could never face

He built a wall of steel and flame
And men with guns to keep it tame
Then standing back he made it plain
That the nightmare would never ever rise again
But the fear and the fire and the guns remain

It doesn't matter now it's over anyhow
He tells the world that it's sleeping
But as the night came round I heard
It slowly sound
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping

And then one day the neighbors came
They were curious to know about the smoke and flame
They stood around outside the wall
But of course there was nothing to be heard at all
"My friends," he said, "We've reached our goal
The threat is under firm control
As long as peace and order reign
I'll be damned if I can see a reason to explain
Why the fear and the fire and the guns remain"

It doesn't matter now it's over anyhow
He tells the world that it's sleeping
But as the night came round I heard
It slowly sound
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping

Say ah, say ah, say ah
Say ah, say ah, say ah

It doesn't matter now it's over anyhow
It doesn't matter now it's over anyhow

It doesn't matter now it's over anyhow
He tells the world that it's sleeping
But as the night came round I heard
It slowly sound
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping
It wasn't roaring, it was weeping

Say ah, say ah, say ah
Say ah, say ah, say ah


Lyrics submitted by Purifiedx

"Weeping" as written by Thomas Fox Daniel Heymann

Lyrics © KOBALT MUSIC PUBLISHING LIMITED,

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Weeping song meanings
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20 Comments

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  • +3
    General CommentThis is a South African resistance song, written in the mid-1980's by a young white soldier named Dan Heyman conscripted to the SADF. The young soldier was sent to a township to enforce curfew on the many inhabitants. He was outraged by the oppression he saw there and wrote this song in defiance. The man in the lyrics is Hendrik Verwoerd the architect of Apartheid. The song highlights Verwoerd's arrogance toward the world's media when he was questioned about the situation in South Africa. The song is about the barrier he created between races to keep white people "safe from the Back Danger" he made black people out to be dangerous, monstrous even. When in reality, the oppressed were innocents, weeping instead of roaring. A very moving song about White supremacist ignorance.
    KT339on March 18, 2012   Link
  • +2
    General CommentI like all the ideas above but this song is actually a South African protest song (if I'm not mistaken). It is originally written and performed by a South African group Bright Blue.
    FarahAfizaon April 05, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General CommentYeah I heard somewhere that this is an African song protesting Apartheid.
    MarchingGrobaniteon May 21, 2007   Link
  • +2
    General CommentActually, this does have a lot of political sentiment, and I can certainly see this being about Apartheid. The man being referenced is more of 'The Man' as commonly referred to in the States as the Government/Police, the 'secret place' being the areas of the city where the blacks were forced to be segregated from the white communities, even though sometimes all that separated them was a fence. They had the military to keep them tame and in fear so it appeared all was well, but when you really talked to these people, they weren't angry, they were sad that their government felt it was necessary to keep the status quo as it was under Apartheid. "The neighbors came" was when the rest of the world began to take notice of what was happening and protest, but 'The Man' was able to make it look like everything was still okay. But if that was okay, why were there still military patrols and so on having to enforce the segregation?

    This could even refer to the US during segregation as well, or any other country where the government is oppressing their people.
    sierrataon July 15, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentHmm no comments yet? Well this song could any number of things. It's got to be a metaphor for something. Just haven’t really delved into it that much yet. I love the African vibe to it though. Very moving.
    serendipitydooon November 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think it's about someone with a past or secret that haunts him/her. They want to leave it behind but it's difficult to hide from not only themself, but also others.

    Because of this, this person has a guarded exterior and has reinvented himself into a lie, and is miserable about it. The 'roaring' is the lie, and the 'weeping' is the truth.
    Purifiedxon November 11, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment^^Wow... That is a really neat idea behind it... Thank you for sharing.
    HELENzon January 04, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think that many of the things that we fear so greatly, that are horrific even in their very idea, are not as harmful as we think they are.
    If you aren't careful how you face these challenges, you might wind up with a bigger problem than the one you started out with.
    Problems, trials, and challenges are designed to make us stronger. If they don't, that's good reason to be weeping.
    andethirienon January 06, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General Comment^^Wow. That's quite profound. I like that.
    HELENzon January 14, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentJosh Groban went to south africa becuase he has a thing he's working for fighting and preventing HIV/AIDS
    This song was inspired by all the people there.
    I think it is about the men fighting the disease and fearing death and other such sicknessess.
    stinzieohhon March 18, 2007   Link

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