We go down to throw rocks at the river, curses at the
parade. Wedge a stone in the gears of the clockworks,
try to keep us from acting our age. We swore we'd
carry on like this forever, 'til the free spirits bled.
But now can you believe who's a mother, and that
so-and-so's cut of their dreads.

Kill of Columbus and turn the world around.
After all the nomads are settling down.

Used to give most the bread to her
landlord leave the crust for the squwats.
Now the death weighed as we payed the bankers.
Seemed to kill all the flies in one swat.
Hear the wedding band strike up a number. Dear
they're playing our song. Hold your breath cause
we're gonna go under; get the little ones singing along.

Kill of Columbus and turn the world around.
After all the nomads are settling down.(2x)
After all the nomads are settling down.

No way, not to so-and-so said he'd never change
said he'd never grow. We'd stay always on a role
run besides the trains past the mossey stones.
Now there's more hope than ever and its all fallin'
down and the rebels are running for mayor in your hometown.

As the nomads are dropping their anchors. Falling
into the sea. And I've stopped throwing rocks at the
river. Now you'll find me a swimmin up stream. There
is power in unions of ramblers that got nothing to own.
But there's more in one fist swing in mothers swearin,
"my children shall never be sold!"

Kill of columbus and turn the world around.
After all the nomads are settling down.(2x)
After all the nomads are settling down.

Out of the garden we multiply. Telling
our stories. May all the old ways die.


Lyrics submitted by haveXheart

Nomads Revolt song meanings
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11 Comments

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  • 0
    General CommentThis song is fucking amazing. I adore Mischeif Brew and the Orphans.

    I think its talking about getting older, and that feeling of nostalgia when you see people you haven't seen in a long time getting older. I know that feeling so perfectly... like when you find out one of your childhood best friends gets drunk a lot or is pregnant... they should stay little kids, don't you think?
    And it makes you want to go back to your old ways "throwing rocks in the river"

    And unfortunately the nomads, the kids who didn't know what their place in the world was, are settling down into regular lives.
    namesareaclicheon October 12, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI think this song is about the nomads and revolutionaries that have grown old and are starting to marry and settle down and putting thier agresive politics on the back burner. This song really means alot to me seeing as my mother used to be a nomad when she was younger then in her late 20's she settled down, got married and had children.
    JessiTheRiveteron October 24, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis song is amazing. The meaning is pretty much self-explanatory. But when I listen to this, it reminds me that no matter how much I vow now to never settle down, it may be inevitable. I look at my parents' generation of the hippies and the wanderers and everything and most of them are all settled down.

    After all, the nomads ARE settling down...
    GypsyOfTheLowlandson December 30, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI just think the the general idea of the song is that, people DO change, its inevitable, and it comes with age.
    emilyk.on May 26, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI just think the the general idea of the song is that, people DO change, its inevitable, and it comes with age.
    emilyk.on May 26, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI have so many memories attached to this song that I think it'd be a little inane to explain it that much, but I will say I think it shows as both the passionate nomads, revolutionaries, activists, children, ect. will grow up, but the line "kill off columbus and turn the world around" is saying never loose hope and never give up on the foundations of yer beliefs and how there are other ways to effect change as you grow older.

    "There
    is power in unions of ramblers that got nothing to own.
    But there's more in one fist swing in mothers swearin,
    "my children shall never be sold!" "

    At least to me that's what I got
    Harrisonkleboldon September 27, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI'm not sure I get the "mothers swearing" line? Is it the last generations hope that the next won't have to give up their ideals?

    I don't think that the song is so much about the ineviblilty (sp?) of growing up but a lament about watching friends grow old. (Otherwise why are the newlyweds "going under"?)
    ElegantMuleon December 07, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentElegantMule,
    "There is power in unions of ramblers who got nothing to own/ But there's more in one fist swingin' mother swearin', 'My Children shall never be sold!'"
    To me this is him saying that while you may have legions of penniless, idealistic, 'revolutionary' nomads who make some kind of difference, the same revolutionary words spoken from a mother (here used as a representation for settling down and growing older) are even more powerful because it's coming from a place of more credibility.

    tl;dr - A whole gathering of career protesters may carry a voice, but it's not as powerful as that of an angry mom saying the same thing.
    Samhainon April 22, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General CommentSometimes there's more passion in one fist than a whole movement.
    nefittyon June 14, 2008   Link
  • 0
    General Commentwell there are some errors in the lyrics but they're generally right. Most of what people said here is right, but there is more too it.

    The whole song is mainly about squatters/transients...hippies, revolutionaries, ect.. is kinda right, but mainly those who hop trains ("We'd stay always on a role
    run besides the trains"), who live in squats ("Used to give most the bread to her
    landlord leave the crust for the squwats.") and typically have no desire to participate in must social activities unless it deals with community outreach, activism, and protests. The whole squatter movement was to break the financial chains thrust upon us since an early age. Thus by living in vacant buildings, living off the generosity of others and not caring about money in general, one believed it would tear down the corporate machine.

    The point in the song was him reflecting back on how him and his squat buddies said they would never change and always go from city to city...but alas he now see's their mothers, fathers, employees, "mayors"...it goes into the whole SLC Punk philosophy of "not selling out, but buying in" and "you can do more damage in the system than outside of it".

    This coincides with the "There
    is power in unions of ramblers that got nothing to own. (squatters)
    But there's more in one fist swing in mothers swearin,
    "my children shall never be sold!""

    A former activist, nomad, squatter, freedom fighter who teaches their children the way of peace, love, truth, and hope...is more powerful than one who mearly says fuck it and has no true legacy to leave behind.

    By saying "And I've stopped throwing rocks at the
    river. Now you'll find me a swimmin up stream." he's saying how he's stopped trying to avoid society, and instead has jumped right into it...and is TRULY fighting and making a difference.

    "let the old ways die" is basically saying, let what we thought was making a difference be learned from, but that era, phase is over...its time to truly change the world effectively.

    hope this clears up things.
    monksbaneon July 14, 2008   Link

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