"Blues From Down Here" as written by and Jaleel Bunton Gerard A Smith....
From the depths I called you, ma
For your breath and breast so warm and fabled
Your hands reached inside
Grabbed my heart, enlarged, disabled

Hailed for your mercy
An ear that cares

How the blues sound from up there?

With my wet hair, I wipe the blood off of your feet
Carry me through these shark infested waters
Well you spared me from slaughter for sure,
But these sharks are equally in need of a martyr

Oh kindess shared
Undeserved purest gift, this life you spared

How the blues sound from up there?

Teeth gnashing, masticating this dumb tongue
Quiet now, quiet now, hear that supplication
Echo into the void
Been received by no one

Oh my sweet dear
Cold alone poisoning ourselves
Engulfed in our own tears

Signed, blues from down here.

Pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your

Time for your favorite story
Of how to achieve golden glory
Wash yourself all squeaky clean
All in white all Hallow's Eve

Lessen your desire
Hold your breath so patiently
Never inquire how to be free
Just stay on your knees

You might doubt it
Think there's nothing left for me
To do but stomp my feet
And shout about it

From the depths I called you.

Now I'm waiting for an answer patiently
Stuck here at the bottom of this well
It's not the last you've heard from me


Lyrics submitted by .tommy doll

"Blues from Down Here" as written by David Andrew Sitek Babatunde Omoroga Adebimpe

Lyrics © BMG RIGHTS MANAGEMENT US, LLC

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Blues From Down Here song meanings
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  • +1
    General Commentactually, no. the way i have it is correct. i typed these lyrics straight out of the cd sleeve.

    "pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your"

    i think they left the last word in the sentence absent on purpose. sort of like a fill-in-the-blank.

    were the blank to be filled in i think it would read,
    "pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your SIN"
    .tommy dollon August 15, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Comment"With my wet hair, I wipe the blood off of your feet
    Carry me through these shark infested waters
    Well you spared me from slaughter for sure,
    but these sharks are equally in need of a martyr"

    i love that verse. the imagery it paints is extraordinay. im having a hard time trying to decipher what this song means, but i love its tempo. its constant, ongoing, and makes me want to move. my favorite CD of 2006, by far.
    auto_suggestionon September 14, 2006   Link
  • +1
    General Commenti believe the meaning of the song is strongly religious, although i do not believe the singer intends to simply state an opinion of the variety proposed by sstennett. rather, i believe he intends to convey a complex point of view, perhaps his own.

    to begin with, the very first line "from the depths, i call you", google explains, is from the beginning of psalm 130. however, the song replaces "lord" with "ma", introducing a metaphor used in the second line to convey the desirable comfort found in religion. however, as he soon explains, his heart was enlarged and then left disabled, basically stating that he was doing fine by himself, then he developed an intense desire to be close to God, but he is left wanting, leaving him now feeling disabled.

    "teeth gnashing" is another strong biblical reference, as that phrase is always used in connection to those who are not granted salvation ("wailing and gnashing of teeth", specifically). he spends several verses explaining how feels protected by the lord, for which he is thankful, but in the end, he thinks he is among the damned masses. i believe this is where the title fits in: he feels distanced from God, and he's singin' the blues.

    however, this isn't because he's chosen to separate himself, he is trying his hardest to achieve the comfort "so warm and fabled". the lines "hear that supplication (prayer) echo through the void, been received by noone" and "Now I'm waiting for an answer patiently" demonstrate that he's trying, but not getting anything back.

    then there is the part everyone else has been picking up on, starting with "pull the pin, drop it in" and ending with "just stay on your knees". i agree that this is about traditional organized religion, but not so much that he thinks its all crap, but that he can't accept their simplicity of thought. it sounds like he feels deeply compelled not to take religion as an axiomatic basis, even though doing so would provide him simple comfort. he mocks this childish faith ("faith like a child", also another biblical reference) with the "time for your favorite story..." line.

    finally, the last line of the song wraps it all up: he's not particularly pleased and really wishes he could just have a simple blind-faith relationship with the lord like so many people he sees, but he can't. so he's expressing his frustration, to the Lord, but maintaining that he's not going to give up. "it's not the last you've heard from me".

    ... or at least thats how i read it :)
    and howon April 19, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentIts

    "Pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away ALL"

    still... good fucking song. I have been listening to them since 2003. And they KEEP getting better...

    goddamn why cant i fucking write like them?
    jackiwillbeon August 12, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your SIN"

    I like that.
    Pie_floateron August 21, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment"From the depths I called you, ma"
    I think 'from the depths' is the narrators mothers perception of her son and not the sons perception of himself. The mother is religious and the son is trying to call to her and tell him there is a different way to live. Although, I think it is possible that because of the effects of religion the narrator actually feels like he is calling from the depths or like he is in the depths.

    "for your breath and breast so warm and fabled
    Your hands reached inside
    grabbed my heart, enlarged, disabled"
    I think this shows what a parent can do to a child's heart by forcing religion, enlarge a heart with fables and tall tales and then disable it once they lose their innocence and see the reality of the world, or disable it from the eventual strangling effects of religion.

    "Hailed for your mercy"
    the narrator is begging for mercy from his mother for being an unbeliever

    "An ear that cares"
    the narrator wants to speak about his problems with organized religion but the mother doesn't seem to give an ear that cares.

    "How the blues sound from up there?"
    I think this is, again, the narrator feeling that his mother (religious people) puts herself (themselves) above her son (nonbelievers) and looks down on him (nonbelievers). So, he is wondering how the blues (one's everyday sorrows) sound (feel) from up there(life with religion).

    "With my wet hair, I wipe the blood off of your feet
    Carry me through these shark infested waters"
    I think the sharks are the masses/religious believers and the narrator is young and being carried through maybe a church (shark infested waters).

    "Well you spared me from slaughter for sure,
    but these sharks are equally in need of a martyr"
    I think the narrators mother spared him by letting him know(possibly forcefully) that people do not tolerate nonbelief. I am not sure what the martyr part is about.

    "Oh kindess shared
    Undeserved purest gift, this life you spared"
    I am having trouble with this verse and will leave it alone for now.

    How the blues sound from up there?

    "Teeth gnashing, masticating this dumb tongue"
    narrator chewing on his tongue to keep from saying what he thinks he shouldn't say

    "Quiet now, quiet now, hear that supplication
    echo into the void
    been recieved by no one"
    this sounds like the narrator never felt god and after many times of sending heartfelt prayers into a void he realized they are never receiving any response.

    "Oh my sweet dear
    Cold alone poisoning ourselves
    engulfed in our own tears"
    The poison of religion is engulfing the narrator and his mother in suffering.

    Signed, blues from down here.

    "Pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your"
    I agree with tommy doll, that if the last word was included it would be sin.
    With this added in, I think of the line as talking about soldiers throwing grenades, fighting for god and feeling like they will be rewarded for killing.

    "Time for your favorite story
    of how to achieve golden glory"
    The churchgoers favorite story of salvation.

    "Wash yourself all squeaky clean"
    Repent for your sins.

    "all in white all Hallow's Eve"
    in all white on devil's night

    "Lessen your desire"
    Thou shall not covet

    "hold your breath so patiently"
    Hold your breath patiently on Earth until Heaven and eternal bliss.

    "never inquire how to be free"
    never even see the option of being free from religion or just free in general.

    "Just stay on your knees"
    Just stay on your knees praying literally and metaphorically don't rise up.

    "You might doubt it"
    doubt what the nonbelieving narrator believes

    "think there's nothing left for me
    to do but stomp my feet
    and shout about it"
    those that doubt what the narrator is expressing think there's nothing one can do to stop organized religion except to stomp their feet and shout about it.

    "From the depths I called you.

    Now I'm waiting for an answer patiently
    Stuck here at the bottom of this well
    It's not the last you've heard from me"

    The narrator is telling his mother that he will wait patiently for her answer to the religious questions he presented to her. He also says he is not going to give up on her: "it's not the last you've heard from me.

    I think I used I think quite a bit, mostly to keep from sounding too matter of fact because I do believe that this is only an interpretation of the song. I think at face value this song is about a non believing narrator and his religious mother but metaphorically I think it is about the experiences of non believers with religious people.
    To clarify, I do not think all religous people are crazy or malicious. I certainly believe they have good intentions and I think some are quite rational but it sure is hard to see them with all the nuts out there.
    sstennetton October 15, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Commenthmm i'd have to watch labrynth again to check that theory, but the guy above seems to have said it pretty well.. amazing song!
    SixStringSoulon January 10, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI like sstennett's rendition, but I'd also like to mention the "Pull the pin, drop it in, let it wash away your" [Sin] reminds me more of baptism (water going down the drain when you pull out the plug) than of grenades.

    Also:
    "Oh kindness shared
    Undeserved purest gift, this life you spared"
    Kindness shared is the offer of religion, the "Undeserved purest gift" being life. The person's mother spared him from nonexistance, or it may be mockery, saying "Thank you for sparing me from a life without religion".

    As far as I can tell, this doesn't have much to do with Labyrinth (which I've seen quite recently).
    RealityRippleon January 13, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentThis isn't about relgion -- and it certainly doesn't have anything to do with Labyrinth -- it's about class struggle and cold-hearted economics. When 10% of the people control 90% of the wealth in our societies, something is seriously wrong, and this song is addressing the disparity between the haves and the have-nots.
    espanyson January 29, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentFurthermore, the titular line in the song, "How do the blues sound from up there?" is an inquiry into how the rich, in their gilded towers, react to the suffering and day-to-day struggles of the poor, whom they use as human fodder to power their ubiquitous commercial and industrial machines.

    The singular reference to religion can be found in the following lines:

    "Time for your favorite story
    Of how to achieve golden glory
    Wash yourself all squeaky clean
    All in while on All Hallow's Eve"

    This is, of course, the answer to the aforementioned inquiry, and is a clear invokation of the famous quote by Karl Marx, stating that "religion is the opium of the people." Basically, if you're poor, living paycheck-to-paycheck, can barely afford to feed your family, don't have health insurance, etc., then put your faith in God, because the high priests of the free market don't give a shit about you.

    After that, it's back to more of the same. "Just stay on your knees" because if too many of us choose to rise up and say enough! with this mindless exploitation of the working poor, then the house of cards built by big business may just come tumbling down.

    Here's hoping it happens sooner rather than later.
    espanyson January 29, 2007   Link

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