Stephen you're still really something
England has its only nervy
Whoa oh oh Stephen
I'll tell you something
Stephen let's bring down the curtain

You know the love god
You must change your heart
We're coming sweet stubble
Well we're nothin' but trouble
Stephen you're still really something

Stephen electric lady (electric lady)
Stephen was she here my baby
Whoa oh oh Stephen
I was once anorexic
Stephen I'm a reborn skeptic

On perks and pill purses
Of wise little Herse and as
Immature hours must tears to dispower
Stephen you're still really something

If I'm going down I'll pull you down with me
In alot of ways send me poetry
Would I be more attractive
If I prove that he's mine
He's still got this urge to be Valentine

Oh Stephen, turning it even
Stephen, no need for treason
Stephen, what's on the jukebox?
Stephen, you know about the fraud talk
Whoa Stephen, I thought I'd just mention
Oh Stephen, I resent your ascension

Did you take a laugh
And then hold me back
As if nothin' you'd talked from
Back and it's grown from

Stephen, you're still really something
Stephen, you're still really something

And If I'm goin' down I'll pull you down with me
In alot of ways send me poetry
Would I be more attractive
If I prove that he's mine
Well I still got this urge to be Valentine

Oh Stephen, you're still really something
Oh Stephen, you're still really something

Whoa
Did you take a laugh
And then hold me back
But a' nothing is wasted
That I can't disclose

Stephen, you're still really something
Ooh Stephen, you're still really something
Stephen, you're still really something
Oh Stephen, you're still really something
Ooh Stephen, you're still really something



Lyrics submitted by Shades


Stephen, You're Still Really Something song meanings
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2 Comments

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  • 0
    General Comment:This song is apparently about Morrissey, as he and Billy Mackenzie were rumoured to be lovers in the Eighties. Some people think that the Smiths song "William, It Was Really Nothing", was written with Mackenzie in mind and this was his answer, although that theory falls down slightly when one learns that this song is actually credited to Alan Rankine, not Mackenzie. Also, Morrissey's first name is spelt "Steven", although this could just be an error on the writer's part. Perhaps Mackenzie wrote the lyrics and just wasn't credited, or perhaps Rankine decided to "reply" on Mackenzie's behalf. Or perhaps it's all just one big coincidence/pubilicity stunt. Who knows?
    Shadeson June 25, 2006   Link
  • 0
    General Comment:I'm leaning towards the 'publicity stunt' theory ;)

    I don't think Morrissey and Billy McKenzie were rumoured to be lovers in the 80s, as far as I know the rumour only started because of this song. They met once for a few hours in 1984, as part of a press-staged 'date', and apparently they didn't get along especially well, at least according to what Morrissey said when asked about it in an interview shortly afterwards (he said they tried to find common ground, but there wasn't any, and he was 'shocked' when Billy walked out with his copy of a James Dean biography, or something like that).

    The theory further falls down more than slightlly when you consider that it is highly unlikely the song "William, It Was Really Nothing" was written abotu Billy McKenzie, since 1) the lyrics don't suggest that (why would Morrissey sing about Billy being engaged to a 'fat girl'? Was he even engaged at the time? I don't think I've ever heard any information of that kind), 2) to anyone who's ever seen the 1960s film "Billy Liar", it should be more than obvious that the scenario of "William, It Was Really Nothing" is taken from that film, and that the eponymous William is in fact William Fisher aka Billy Liar, played by Tom Courtney - a young man from small-town, stuck in a job he hates (with an annoying boss called Mr Shadrock), and engaged to two rather obnoxious girls at the same time, one of them being quite plump (an engagement ring plays quite a part in the film, too). He is unsatisfied with his life and escapes the reality by daydreaming about himself as a great writer, a leader of an imaginary country called Ambrosia, etc. Finally he gets the chance to turn his dreams into reality and go to London with the girl of his dreams (played by Julie Christie) to become a writer for a famous comedian... (and I'll stop here so I wouldn't spoil the film completely.) It's also quite obvious that the film was the inspiration for two other Smiths songs: "Frankly, Mr Shankly" and "London", and there are a number of other phrases Morrissey took from it ("We could walk where it's quiet" - The Queen Is Dead, "combating ignorance and disease" - Vicar In A Tutu).
    nightanddayon September 18, 2006   Link

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