"Black Boys On Mopeds" as written by and Sinead O'connor....
Margareth Thatcher on TV
Shocked by the deaths that took place in Beijing
It seems strange that she should be offended
The same orders are given by her
I've said this before now
You said I was childish and you'll say it now
Remember what I told you
If they hated me they will hate you
England's not the mythical land of Madame George and roses
It's the home of police who kill black boys on mopeds
And I love my boy and that's why I'm leaving
I don't want him to be aware that there's
Any such thing as grieving
Young mother down at Smithfield
Five a.m., looking for food for her kids
In her arms she holds three cold babies
And the first word that they learned was please
These are dangerous days
To say what you feel is to dig your own grave
Remember what I told you
If you were of the world they would love you
England's not the mythical land of Madame George and roses
It's the home of police who kill blacks boys on mopeds
And I love my boy and that's why I'm leaving
I don't want him to be aware that there's
Any such thing as grieving


Lyrics submitted by xdarkentries

"Black Boys on Mopeds" as written by Steve Tyrell Robert Mann

Lyrics © Sony/ATV Music Publishing LLC

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Black Boys On Mopeds song meanings
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6 Comments

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  • +1
    General CommentMy favourite Sinead O'Connor song, maybe even my favourite song ever. Pretty obvious in it's meaning, good to get a dig in at Maggie.
    thehumblebumblebeeon June 19, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI love the title.
    fxcking_turtleon June 04, 2007   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI grabbed this bit of a web page ..

    the lyrics refer to an incident in England on 17 May 1989 where the police were pursuing a youth called Nicholas Bramble, who was riding a moped, in the mistaken belief that he had stolen the moped. Bramble lost control of the moped (which it turns out was his) in the chase, and crashed it, killing himself. His death was ruled accidental, but O’Connor felt that the police, a “representative of state authority”, caused his death, and the incident (re)sparked accusations of racism in the police force, on the grounds that the police would not have assumed that the youth had stolen the bike, or pursued him so aggressively, had he been white.
    draven66on January 08, 2009   Link
  • 0
    My OpinionOne of the most beautiful songs I've ever heard.
    Beckerouacon May 30, 2009   Link
  • 0
    General CommentJust want to add a few additional details for those who seek them:

    Smithfield is a meat market in London.
    "Madame George" is a wonderful, legendary song by Van Morrison.
    Roses are closely associated with England via Henry VII and the War of the Roses, among other sources.
    The "boy" in question is her son Jake, who was born in 1987 and was her first child.
    sharkycharmingon August 07, 2013   Link
  • 0
    General CommentI absolutely adore both this song by Sinéad O'Connor, and also the Van Morrison song Madame George, to which Ms. O'Connor alludes to in the lyric "England's not the mythical land of Madame George and roses".
    However, what I don't understand is why Sinéad associates Madam George with England or englishness (roses). The location of the rather impressionistic events in Van Morrison's Madame George is firmly around Belfast, Morrisons's birthplace, with its mentions of Cyprus Avenue, Ford and Fitzroy (Avenue?) and Sandy Row, although Dublin is also mentioned "On that train from Dublin up to Sandy Row". There's nothing in the rest of Van's lyrics to indicate that the character Madame George may be English, either.
    Would love to get an explanation for this.
    satchicenineon October 13, 2014   Link

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